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Alberta

When Sports Stopped – Timely new exhibit at the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame

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New feature exhibit examines “When Sports Stopped.”

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic Albertans have been adapting to one change after another with little idea when things will return to “normal”. We are living through a historic time. It began with the closing of museums, schools and daycares – forcing families to stay home and employers to accommodate employees working from home. Soon after we saw the closure of businesses and non-essential stores – once more pushing us to stay home and stay safe. Then came the cancellation of sports – from minor leagues where our children competed, to the profeissional leagues suspending play. This was a shock to our systems as we were gearing up for NHL and NBA playoffs and MLB pre-season games.

“I was just about to return to work from my maternity leave when COVID struck and sports stopped. It made me stop and think about what other global events have caused sports to stop? If I was asking these questions then so were many other people.” Comments Breanna Suk, Collections and Exhibit Coordinator. “I came back to work in May with this exhibit already forming in my mind. It got pushed back as we had bigger priorities when I first returned, so seeing it all come together seven months later is a great feeling.”

This new exhibition examines the effects of global events from the Spanish Flu through both World Wars and right up to COVID had on sports. It may seem likely that the postponement of the Utah Jazz – Oklahoma City Thunder NBA game just minutes before tip-off due to Rudy Gobert’s positive COVID test and the subsequent suspension of many professional leagues was a new occurrence. This exhibit highlights multiple past occurrences where international events have brought a stop to sports.

This exhibition is expected to be on display in the museum’s main gallery starting November 20, 2020. Be sure to stop in and see it for yourself.

The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame provides a family-friendly, interactive experience. You will be surprised by what you discover inside! Have fun, laugh, play and discover Alberta sports heroes together. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame is an interactive, hands-on celebration of Alberta's sporting history. Our over 7,000 square feet of exhibit space includes a multisport area with virtual baseball, basketball, football, hockey, and soccer; an adaptive sports area, including a 200 meter wheelchair challenge; a Treadwall climbing wall; the Orest Korbutt Theatre; the Hall of Fame Gallery; an art gallery displaying works by provincial artists, and much more. Our venue boasts a collection of over 17,000 artefacts of Alberta sports history and showcases many of these items in a number of displays. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame also offers an education program, group activities, and a unique environment to rent for your birthday party, special event, corporate reception or meetings.

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Alberta

WestJet grounds Max flight before takeoff after system indicates ‘potential fault’

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CALGARY — WestJet says a Boeing 737 Max that was scheduled to fly from Calgary to Toronto on Friday returned to the gate before taking off due to a warning in the cockpit.

A WestJet spokeswoman, Lauren Stewart, said that after the plane’s engines were started, its monitoring system indicated a “potential fault that needed to be verified and reset.”

The process takes time and requires an engine run, which the airline does not perform with passengers on board, Stewart said.

In the interests’ of passengers’ time, WestJet cancelled the flight and booked passengers on the next available flight to Toronto, Stewart said.

The aircraft has since been cleared by maintenance and will return to service as scheduled on Jan. 24, Stewart said.

The Max was cleared to fly in Canadian airspace on Wednesday after it was grounded for nearly two years following deadly crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 22, 2021.

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Alberta

Indigenous business coalition leader says Keystone XL denial will hurt communities

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CALGARY — The leader of a group promoting Indigenous participation in oil and gas development as a solution to poverty on reserves says the cancellation of the Keystone XL pipeline by U.S. President Joe Biden is a major setback.

Dale Swampy, president of the National Coalition of Chiefs, says the decision means fewer jobs in the short term for Indigenous people in constructing the pipeline and supplying goods and services for it.

He adds it also implies more long-term unemployment for those who work in exploring and developing conventional and oilsands projects in Western Canada because it impedes investment in production growth.

The end of the pipeline means Natural Law Energy, which represents five First Nations in Alberta and Saskatchewan, will no longer be able to make an equity investment of up to $1 billion in Keystone XL, as well as a plan by builder TC Energy Corp. to make similar deals with American Indigenous groups.

But Swampy, a member of the Samson Cree Nation in central Alberta, points out that the impact on Indigenous people goes beyond that, noting that four of his five sons work in oil and gas but one of them has been unable to find a job in the current downturn.

In a report published in December, energy industry labour data firm PetroLMI said about 13,800 self-identified Indigenous people were directly employed in Canada’s oil and gas industry in 2019. That’s just over seven per cent of total industry employment, compared to three per cent in other industries.

“It’s quite a blow to the First Nations that are involved right now in working with TC Energy to access employment training and contracting opportunities,” said Swampy.

“Within Alberta, First Nations are pretty closely entrenched with all of the activities occurring with the oil and gas industry. Any change, especially a big change like this, really affects our bands’ ability to keep our people employed.”

Swampy is a former CEO of the Samson band. The coalition he heads was created in 2017 by Indigenous equity partners in the cancelled Northern Gateway pipeline and has a membership of about 80 bands.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 22, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:TRP)

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