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City responded to 83 rough sleeping camps around Red Deer this summer… Here’s what to do if you see one.

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From the City of Red Deer

Rough sleeping encampment update

With an increasing number of rough sleeper camps being reported over the last month, the City of Red Deer is focusing heavily on cleanup efforts across the city.  However, citizens are encouraged to continue reporting rough sleeper camps to the City of Red Deer.

Over the summer, a collaborative cleanup and outreach team worked to respond to 83 camps, which resulted in connecting with 153 individuals about housing and 70 referrals to non-housing related social services.  This collaborative approach was part of a pilot project for an enhanced collaborative response.  The pilot ran from June to August 2018.

“Community safety for all citizens is what matters most when it comes to ensuring our parks, trails and community spaces are safe, clean and accessible for all,” said City Manager Craig Curtis. “It is the result of joint efforts on the part of citizens, community partners and local agencies alike that we were able to connect with and have 153 individual conversations as part of the collaborative camp clean-up process.”

All camps need to be reported to the non-emergency RCMP/Bylaw complaint line at 403-343-5575.  When reporting a rough sleeper camp, you may be asked for personal information such as your name and phone number so Community Peace Officers (CPOs) can follow up on your complaint and ensure they know where the camp is located.

When a camp is reported, CPOs go to the reported site and, when their investigation is complete, they issue a 24 hour eviction notice.  The CPOs then work with City of Red Deer staff to clean up the area within 14 days, whenever possible.

The process to respond to rough sleeper camps is as follows:

  1. Citizens contact the RCMP/ Bylaw complaint line to report the camp.
  2. A Municipal Enforcement Officer is dispatched to the reported camp site, which is often vacant.
  3. Once this work is complete, the issuing officer posts a 24-hour eviction notice, which contains social support services contact information.
  4. Municipal Enforcement then communicates with City of Red Deer staff, who are scheduled to complete weekly camp cleanups.

This approach and process is aimed at preventing the displacement and reoccupation of rough sleepers within the park system by attempting to house people.

“We will continue to balance the needs of all citizens as City staff and community partners respond to calls for rough sleeper camp clean-up including, but not limited to, needle debris and the need for housing and treatmentsupports,” said Mayor Tara Veer. “We strongly encourage citizens to report through the formal complaint line toensure a timely response.”

The collaborative approach to address rough sleeper camps in Red Deer’s parks and other green spaces resultedin the removal of 16 tonnes of debris and 1,005 needles between June 1 and August 30, 2018.  City staff spent approximately 1,343 hours cleaning up camps, with Turning Point and the Safe Harbour society providing outreach support to individuals living at 35 of the 83 camps cleaned up over the summer months.

For more information about rough sleeper camps, visit www.reddeer.ca.

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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From Baked Alaska to a guy with horns: notable riot arrests

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WASHINGTON — More than 125 people have been arrested so far on charges related to the violent insurrection led by supporters of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol, where a Capitol police officer and four others were killed.

Charges from the Jan. 6 riot range from curfew violations to serious federal felonies related to theft and weapons possession.

From a man pictured kicking his feet up on a desk in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office to a far right-wing media personality known as “Baked Alaska” to the bare-chested guy sporting a furry hat with horns, here’s a list in alphabetical order of some of the more notable arrests and allegations made by authorities.

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Richard Barnett, 60, of Arkansas was photographed sitting with his boots on a desk in Pelosi’s office during the Jan. 6 riot. He was ordered Friday to be brought to Washington, where he faces charges of unlawfully entering a restricted area with a lethal weapon — a stun gun. Barnett is also charged with disorderly conduct and theft of public property.

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Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Larry Rendall Brock Jr., of Texas, is a former former fighter pilot photographed on the Senate floor wearing a military style helmet and body armour and carrying plastic zip-tie handcuffs. He is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

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Jacob Chansley, 33 of Arizona was seen in the capitol wearing face paint, no shirt and a furry hat with horns and carrying a U.S. flag attached to a spear. Chansley, also known as Jake Angeli, calls himself the “QAnon Shaman,” a reference to the apocalyptic and convoluted conspiracy theory spread largely through the internet and promoted by some right-wing extremists. He is charged with entering a restricted building without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

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Lonnie Leroy Coffman, 70, of Alabama drove to Washington to attend Trump’s “Save America Rally” in a red pickup packed with an M4 assault rifle, multiple loaded magazines, three handguns and 11 Mason jars filled with homemade napalm, according to court filings. The grandfather was arrested that evening when he returned to the truck carrying a 9mm Smith & Wesson handgun and a .22-calibre derringer pistol. He is charged with possession of an unregistered firearm and carrying a pistol without a license.

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Jenny Cudd of Texas, a former mayoral candidate in Midland, was arrested after posting a video bragging that she was part of a group that broke down Pelosi’s door. Cudd, who owns a flower shop, deleted the video and told The Associated Press she didn’t personally go into Pelosi’s office and didn’t do anything violent or destroy any property. She was charged with entering a restricted building and disorderly conduct, both misdemeanours. She said she received death threats and her business, Becky’s Flowers, was bombarded with one-star reviews calling her a traitor and domestic terrorist.

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Derrick Evans, 35, was a West Virginia lawmaker who streamed video of himself charging into the building with the mob. The recently sworn-in delegate to the West Virginia House resigned after his arrest on two riot-related charges and apologized. Evans was quickly identified after he posted the video of the Capitol door being smashed and declaring: “The door is cracked! … We’re in, we’re in! Derrick Evans is in the Capitol!”

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Tim Gionet, a far-right media personality who calls himself “Baked Alaska,” entered various offices in the Capitol and cursed at a law officer he alleged had shoved him. When told by law enforcement officers to move, he identified himself as a member of the media. Gionet live-streamed for about a half hour from inside the building and could be heard encouraging other protesters not to leave, cussing and saying “I’m staying” and “1776 baby,” prosecutors said. He was arrested in Houston and faces charges of violent and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and knowingly entering a restricted building without lawful authority.

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Jack Jesse Griffith of Tennessee was arrested after an informant identified him as a person known on Facebook as Juan Bibiano. That account shows of Griffith in what appears to be the Capitol Crypt, raising his closed fist into the air. Another post included a message saying he helped “stormed (sic) the capitol today.” He is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority to do so. He’s also accused of engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct with intent to to impede or disrupt government business.

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Emily Hernandez of Missouri was seen in photos holding a splintered name plate belonging to Pelosi. Hernandez is charged with five counts, including disorderly conduct that impedes the conduct of government business and the stealing or disposing of government property.

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Doug Jensen, 41, of Iowa was seen on video chasing a Black officer up an interior flight of stairs in the Capitol as a mob trailed several steps behind. Jensen, who is white, was charged with trespassing and disorderly conduct.

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Adam Johnson, 36, of Florida is accused of swiping Pelosi’s lectern during the chaos and smiling as he walked through the Capitol rotunda with it. He is charged with theft, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

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Nicholas R. Ochs, 34, of Hawaii, founder of a local Proud Boys chapter, posted a photo of himself on Twitter inside the Capitol grinning widely as he smoked a cigarette. The FBI said it identified him from photos taken when Ochs campaigned unsuccessfully last year as the Republican nominee for a seat in the Hawaii statehouse.

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Robert Keith Packer, 56, of Virginia caused an uproar on social media after being seen in the Capitol wearing a sweatshirt bearing the name “Camp Auschwitz,” a reference to the Nazi concentration camp where about 1.1 million people were killed during World War II. He was charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, and unlawfully entering a restricted building.

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Dominic Pezzola, 43, of New York is a former Marine identified as a Proud Boys member who was seen in video shattering an exterior Capitol window with a stolen Capitol Police riot shield before he and others climbed inside, the FBI said. The bearded man, whose nickname is “Spazzo,” also appears in a second video taken inside the building that shows him puffing a cigar in what he calls a “victory smoke,” according to a court filing. He is charged with destruction of government property, obstruction of an official proceeding and illegally entering a restricted building.

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Jenna Ryan, 50, of Texas live-streamed a Facebook video walking with a group toward the Capitol and said, “We are going to (expletive) go in here” as they approached the door. “Life or death, it doesn’t matter. Here we go.” She then turned the camera to expose her face and said, “Y’all know who to hire for your Realtor, Jenna Ryan.” She told KTVT-TV in Fort Worth she didn’t do anything violent, didn’t realize there was violence and hoped Trump would pardon her. “I just want people to know I’m a normal person, that I listen to my president who told me to go to the Capitol, that I was displaying my patriotism.” She faces a charge of knowingly entering or remaining in the restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

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Robert Sanford, 55, a retired Pennsylvania firefighter, allegedly threw a fire extinguisher that hit three Capitol Police officers during the violent siege. He was charged with assault of a police officer, disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, civil disorder and unlawfully entering the Capitol. His lawyer said he was a Trump supporter who got caught up in the mob mentality.

The Associated Press






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Biden intends quick executive actions to propel his agenda

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WASHINGTON — On the first day of his presidency, Joe Biden plans to roll back some of President Donald Trump’s most controversial policies and take steps to address the coronavirus pandemic, his incoming chief of staff says.

The opening salvo on Wednesday, after his inauguration, would herald a 10-day blitz of executive actions as Biden acts quickly to redirect the country without waiting for Congress.

After taking the oath of office, Bill will end Trump’s restriction on immigration to the U.S. from some Muslim-majority countries, move to rejoin the Paris climate accord and mandate mask-wearing on federal property and during interstate travel. Those are among roughly a dozen actions Biden will take on his first day in the White House, incoming chief of staff Ron Klain said Saturday in a memo to senior staff.

Other actions include extending the pause on student loan payments and actions meant to prevent evictions and foreclosures for those struggling during the pandemic.

“These executive actions will deliver relief to the millions of Americans that are struggling in the face of these crises,” Klain said in the memo. “President-elect Biden will take action — not just to reverse the gravest damages of the Trump administration — but also to start moving our country forward.”

“Full achievement” of Biden’s goals will require Congress to act, Klain wrote, including the $1.9 trillion virus relief bill he outlined last Thursday. Klain said that Biden would also propose a comprehensive immigration bill to lawmakers on his first day in office.

Providing a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. illegally will be part of Biden’s agenda, according to people briefed on his plans.

Ali Noorani, president of the National Immigration Forum and among those briefed, said immigrants would be put on an eight-year path. There would be a faster track for those in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which shields people from deportation who came to the U.S. as children, and for those from strife-torn countries with temporary status.

On Thursday, the new president’s second day in office, Biden would sign orders related to the COVID-19 outbreak aimed at reopening schools and businesses and expanding virus testing, Klain said. The following day, Friday, will see action on providing economic relief to those suffering the economic costs of the pandemic.

In the following week, Klain said, Biden would take additional actions relating to criminal justice reform, climate change and immigration — including a directive to speed the reuniting of families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border under Trump’s policies.

More actions will be added, Klain said, once they clear legal review.

Incoming presidents traditionally move swiftly to sign an array of executive actions when they take office. Trump did the same, but he found many of his orders challenged and even rejected by courts.

Klain maintained that Biden should not suffer similar issues, saying “the legal theory behind them is well-founded and represents a restoration of an appropriate, constitutional role for the President.”

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Associated Press writer Elliot Spagat in San Diego contributed to this report.

Zeke Miller, The Associated Press

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january, 2021

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