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Alberta

We Look Into The One Annual Event Covid-19 Cannot Cancel – Go Skateboarding Day

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From an original symbol of menace and mischief subject to criminal bans in certain cities, to a mainstream sport with international competitions and heavy influence in the fashion and music industries, the evolution of skateboarding has been controversial. As a standalone sport, the skateboarding community has built a global network founded on its own unique culture, members and attitude. 

“Skateboarding is a sport like no other … There are no teams and no rules. When someone skates well, we all win.” – Skateboard Here

Sunday, June 21, 2020 is the 16thannual Go Skateboarding Day (GSD), an international holiday encouraging skateboarders around the world to drop everything and go ride. Created in 2004 by the International Association of Skateboard Companies (IASC), GSD launched in southern California, the “unofficial skateboarding capital, and spread across the globe with the goal of becoming the “grind heard around the world”. 

Since its inception in ‘04, Go Skateboarding Day has gained increasing traction in skate communities all across the world, but the focus always remains the same. The IASC encourages people everywhere to “put away your phone, your computer and video games, and go skateboarding”. 

Although some members of the community don’t necessarily believe in the spirit of the holiday – skateboarding should be every day! – the sentiment surrounding the holiday largely reflects a positive, community-building event. In 2019, GSD rallies in major Canadian cities Vancouver and Toronto saw thousands of enthusiastic boarders take to the streets to celebrate, “The idea is that anyone who owns a board comes out and participates.” 

Although GSD will look different around the world this year due to COVID-19, the show will certainly go on! With all other major summer events and community gatherings cancelled, Go Skateboarding Day 2020 represents a great opportunity to get out, connect with others and have fun while still maintaining distance. 

According to Daniel Craig, Chair for the Calgary Association of Skateboarding Enthusiasts (CASE), the organization has not planned any official events due to COVID-19 concerns and regulations, but still encourages Calgary to get out and ride. “Skateboarding is social, it’s exercise, and it’s a great creative outlet for so many people,” says Craig, a skateboarder of 27 years, “I love Go Skateboarding Day. Get out, find a place to push around and do some tricks, enjoy it!” 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Telus Corp. marks opening of Telus Sky in downtown Calgary

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CALGARY — Telus Corp. marked the opening of its new 60-storey Calgary headquarters on Wednesday.

The new $400-million skyscraper, Telus Sky, has been in development for nine years and is now the third-tallest building in downtown Calgary. It features 750,000 square feet of office and retail space as well as 326 rental homes.

The building’s eye-catching design, by architects Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and Dialog, along with developer partner Westbank and Allied, starts with a rectangular floorplate and then gradually twists as it rises.

Integrated into the facade of Telus Sky is Canada’s largest public art display. “Northern Lights” by Canadian author and artist, Douglas Coupland, creates a light show across the building’s exterior.

Telus Sky will be home to more than 1,600 Telus employees. It joins TELUS Garden in Vancouver, TELUS Harbour Toronto, TELUS House Ottawa, and Place TELUS Québec as one of the company’s LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum-certified buildings.

Among the building’s environmental features is a storm water management system that recycles rainwater for use in washroom toilets, reducing the building’s municipal water demand by 70 per cent.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 6, 2022.

Companies in this story: (TSX:T)

Amanda Stephenson, The Canadian Press

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Alberta

First set of tickets for Pope’s mass in Edmonton booked within minutes

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EDMONTON — Thousands of tickets for the Pope’s open-air mass at Edmonton’s Commonwealth Stadium were all booked about 15 minutes after they were made available to the public for free.

The July 26 mass with Pope Francis is part of his six-day Canadian tour, which also includes stops in Quebec City and Iqaluit.

Neil McCarthy, a spokesperson for the papal visit, says organizers were hopeful the first block of 16,000 tickets would be booked immediately because the impact of the event cannot be underestimated.

A total of 65,000 people can attend the mass at the football stadium.

McCarthy says if people haven’t been able to book a seat, they can do so on two other days later this month, when the remaining blocks of free tickets will be made available.

Organizers divided the booking process for the mass over three days, because they say it is easier to manage and want to prioritize some Indigenous people who want to attend.

“We’ve got seating allocations for Indigenous participation, whether it’s residential school survivors, elders, knowledge keepers or those who are supporting them,” McCarthy said Wednesday.

“Today was a very, very positive start to the day. People really want to be with him.”

The Pope is to arrive in Edmonton on July 24. The next day, he is to meet survivors and visit the site of the former Ermineskin Residential School in Maskwacis, about 80 km south of Edmonton.

He is scheduled to arrive in Quebec City on July 27 and stop in Iqaluit on July 29.

The Pope’s visit comes after he apologized in April to Indigenous delegates at the Vatican for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential schools and the intergenerational trauma it caused.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 6, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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