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Alberta

We Look Into The One Annual Event Covid-19 Cannot Cancel – Go Skateboarding Day

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From an original symbol of menace and mischief subject to criminal bans in certain cities, to a mainstream sport with international competitions and heavy influence in the fashion and music industries, the evolution of skateboarding has been controversial. As a standalone sport, the skateboarding community has built a global network founded on its own unique culture, members and attitude. 

“Skateboarding is a sport like no other … There are no teams and no rules. When someone skates well, we all win.” – Skateboard Here

Sunday, June 21, 2020 is the 16thannual Go Skateboarding Day (GSD), an international holiday encouraging skateboarders around the world to drop everything and go ride. Created in 2004 by the International Association of Skateboard Companies (IASC), GSD launched in southern California, the “unofficial skateboarding capital, and spread across the globe with the goal of becoming the “grind heard around the world”. 

Since its inception in ‘04, Go Skateboarding Day has gained increasing traction in skate communities all across the world, but the focus always remains the same. The IASC encourages people everywhere to “put away your phone, your computer and video games, and go skateboarding”. 

Although some members of the community don’t necessarily believe in the spirit of the holiday – skateboarding should be every day! – the sentiment surrounding the holiday largely reflects a positive, community-building event. In 2019, GSD rallies in major Canadian cities Vancouver and Toronto saw thousands of enthusiastic boarders take to the streets to celebrate, “The idea is that anyone who owns a board comes out and participates.” 

Although GSD will look different around the world this year due to COVID-19, the show will certainly go on! With all other major summer events and community gatherings cancelled, Go Skateboarding Day 2020 represents a great opportunity to get out, connect with others and have fun while still maintaining distance. 

According to Daniel Craig, Chair for the Calgary Association of Skateboarding Enthusiasts (CASE), the organization has not planned any official events due to COVID-19 concerns and regulations, but still encourages Calgary to get out and ride. “Skateboarding is social, it’s exercise, and it’s a great creative outlet for so many people,” says Craig, a skateboarder of 27 years, “I love Go Skateboarding Day. Get out, find a place to push around and do some tricks, enjoy it!” 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Alberta to bring in another five million bottles of children’s pain medication

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The Alberta government says it has secured another five million bottles of children’s medication to manage fever and pain.

Premier Danielle Smith says the government is working with Alberta Health Services and Health Canada to bring in the pediatric acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

Parents across Canada have been scrambling to manage their children’s fever and pain as rates of respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, and influenza skyrocket amid a dire shortage of the medications.

Smith says overwhelmed parents can feel confident the government is moving as quickly as it can to bring in the medication and get it to pharmacies across the province.

The federal government also imported one million units of children’s acetaminophen — commonly known as Tylenol — across the country late last month.

Health Canada has distributed the children’s Tylenol to retailers and has also sent children’s ibuprofen — commonly known as Advil — to hospitals.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

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Alberta

CannTrust CEO was warned over illicit pot growing: former compliance worker

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TORONTO — A former director of quality and compliance at CannTrust Holdings Inc. says he warned the company’s chief executive that Health Canada could levy penalties if the firm grew pot in unlicensed rooms at its Niagara, Ont. facility.

In the months leading up to Health Canada finding pot growing in unlicensed rooms, Graham Lee said Tuesday that he told Peter Aceto he couldn’t say what the exact consequences could be, but knew the government regulator had previously issued warning letters and handed out penalties.

For example, Lee said Health Canada reviewed CannTrust’s inventory more extensively after it discovered the company using a storage facility at its Vaughan, Ont. location contrary to licensing.

“In general, Health Canada was there every day checking up on the inventory,” Lee recalled.

His comments were made at the Old City Hall courthouse in Toronto in response to questioning from Dihim Emami, a lawyer representing the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) in a case aiming to prove Aceto and other former CannTrust executives are guilty of several offences related to unlicensed growing at the Niagara facility.

Aceto, former CannTrust chairman Eric Paul and former vice-chairman Mark Litwin have pleaded not guilty to fraud and authorizing, permitting or acquiescing in the commission of an offence.

Litwin and Paul are also facing insider trading charges, and Litwin and Aceto are charged with making a false prospectus and false preliminary prospectus.

The OSC and Royal Canadian Mounted Police allege Litwin, Aceto and Paul did not disclose to investors that about 50 per cent of the growing space at CannTrust’s Pelham, Ont. facility in the Niagara area was not licensed by Health Canada. They say the men used corporate disclosures to assert that they were compliant with regulatory approvals.

They also allege that Litwin and Aceto signed off on prospectuses used to raise money in the U.S., which stated that CannTrust was fully licensed and compliant with regulatory requirements, and that Litwin and Paul traded shares of CannTrust while in possession of material, undisclosed information regarding the unlicensed growing.

The men no longer work for CannTrust and their lawyers are arguing their clients are all innocent.

Frank Addario, Aceto’s lawyer, previously told The Canadian Press his client was hired because of his financial acumen and track record. Before his time at CannTrust, Aceto was the president and chief executive of ING Direct Canada.

Addario also pointed out that CannTrust was subject to inspections and financial audits that uncovered no material issues.

“The evidence will show Peter Aceto behaved legally and with integrity during his time at CannTrust,” Addario said in an email.

However, Lee testified Monday that the growth of cannabis in unlicensed rooms was “very openly discussed” at the pot company.

“There was no hiding this. There was no denial of this,” he said.

On Tuesday, he reinforced those allegations, describing how he brought up his concerns about unlicensed activity during at least one meeting in winter 2019 that he recalled Aceto attended.

“I noticed that no one in the room was referring to or cognizant of the fact that these were unlicensed areas, so I reminded them,” Lee said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

Tara Deschamps, The Canadian Press

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