Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Calgary

Temporary Face Coverings Bylaw comes in effect this weekend: free masks will be available while supplies last

Published

3 minute read

from the City of Calgary

Temporary Face Coverings Bylaw comes in effect this weekend: free masks will be available while supplies last.

The temporary Face Coverings Bylaw (BYLAW NUMBER 26M2020) regulations that require the wearing of face coverings in indoor public premises and public vehicles begins Saturday, August 1, 2020.

“In entering the temporary regulations this Saturday, we want to remind Calgarians to not only have a face covering at hand to wear when entering an indoor public space or public vehicle, but to exercise our kindness and compassion that Calgarians are known for,” says Kay Choi, Manager, Strategic Services, Calgary Community Standards. “With underlying medical conditions or disabilities inhibiting the ability for some to wear a face covering, we ask that people not pass quick judgements, and kindly ask others if they are unable to wear a face covering before they assume.”

Under the bylaw business operators or owners are required to display Face Coverings Bylaw requirement signage in public entryways of the business or vehicle. The City of Calgary has made downloadable signage (including translated versions) and a business and operators guide available on Calgary.ca/covid19.

The City of Calgary, as part of an allotment of face coverings provided by the Province of Alberta, will be making free disposable face coverings available at a number of locations across Calgary, the next 500,000 which will be available starting August 1.

“We have several spots in Calgary where you can pick some free face coverings up,” says Deputy Chief Susan Henry, Calgary Emergency Management Agency. “We recognize that cost and availability may be a barrier for some, so this may help ease the burden on those who don’t already have their own face coverings.”

“Please take only what you need to make sure all those who need them have a chance to get some. If you have your own cloth or homemade face covering, remember those work just fine to help protect others as long as it fits you well.”

The City of Calgary’s primary focus is educating Calgarians on the importance of wearing face coverings in indoor public spaces and public vehicles, rather than enforcement. Failure to wear a face covering where required or failure to display prescribed signage can result in a penalty of $50 or $200.

More information about the bylaw, as well as a list of pick-up locations for the face coverings are available on calgary.ca/covid19.

Read more on Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Graffiti artist completes world’s tallest mural in downtown Calgary

Published on

CALGARY — It looms on the edge of downtown a stone’s throw from the Calgary Tower,  a splash of colour amid aging buildings, railway tracks, parkades and a steady stream of traffic.

It’s billed as the world’s tallest mural, painted by one of the globe’s top graffiti artists, and is part of a project to turn an austere area of downtown into an expansive open-air urban art gallery.

“The brutalism and dystopian look of this area with the giant parkades and the spiral ramps and stuff — it feels like Gotham. So turning this wall from concrete nothing to this is really fun,” said Peter Oliver, president of the Beltline Urban Murals Project, or BUMP.

The mural is an abstract painting in various shades of orange, black, grey, blue, white and yellow and is the creation of DAIM, an internationally renowned German artist. DAIM, whose real name is Mirko Reisser, has been creating public artworks for more than 30 years.

“DAIM’s work is rooted in graffiti art. It’s abstract and he was actually the very first graffiti artist to start exploring three-dimensional works. So his work kind of obeys the laws of light and shadow but defies the laws of gravity,” Oliver said.

“I think his work really marries well with the brutalism of this building and it’s just a massive flat wall of concrete. It’s the very first prefabricated concrete building in Calgary, built in 1980.”

The mural is 95 metres high, making it the tallest mural in the world “by a long shot,” said Oliver.

He said most cities don’t have giant concrete walls available, with the majority being glass, steel or aluminum. So this was a perfect marriage.

DAIM, who was assisted by three local artists, spent over three weeks painting and went through more than 500 cans of spray paint after a base coat was added to the bare concrete. It is to be a permanent addition to the area and, as of last week, was awaiting a coat of UV sealant to make it complete.

Facing toward the east, it can be seen from a long way away.

“If you’ve got the window seat on the airplane, you can see it on the approach into the airport,” Oliver said.

“I think what we’re really doing with BUMP is re-architecting the identity of this city.”

The project will be unveiling about 60 new murals during its annual festival, which runs from Aug. 1 to 28. Before that, the new art work can be viewed by visitors at the annual Calgary Stampede, which begins this week.

“If you’re coming down, I’d check this out over the parade any day,” Oliver said with a chuckle.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 4, 2022.

Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Calgary Stampede receives $10M from federal government to aid recovery from pandemic

Published on

Calgary – The Calgary Stampede has received more than $10 million from the federal government to help it bounce back after last year’s event was scaled down due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A report to the city this week showed the Stampede had an operating loss of $8.3 million in 2021.

Last year’s Stampede ran at half capacity because of COVID-19 public health measures and was cancelled all-together the year before.

Daniel Vandal, the federal minister for Prairies Economic Development Canada, says the money aims to support a full-scale Stampede to deliver the “authentic western experience” this year.

He says it would also help to reignite Alberta’s visitor economy.

The 2022 Stampede is set to run from July 8 to 17.

“Festivals large and small were hard hit during the pandemic,” Vandal said in a news release. “They are events where families and friends come together and take in the exciting atmosphere.

“The tourism industry is facing a strong comeback providing quality jobs across the country, showcasing stunning landscapes and offering exciting experiences right here in Alberta.”

The federal government also provided about $1.8 million for four other tourism projects in southern Alberta: Charmed Resorts, Cochrane Tourism Association, Heritage Park and Tourism Calgary.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 30, 2022.

Continue Reading

Trending

X