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Alberta

NEW MUSIC RELEASE DAY!

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My brand NEW single “it’ll be alright…” is out now! EVERYWHERE!

I’m still riding the ‘high’ of my last release “Lovers In A Dangerous Time.” It’s a bit surreal to be coming out of the gate with another track right on the heels. You know what? I love it though. Why not?

it’ll be alright…” is one of the most experimental tracks I’ve worked on since ‘No Love.’ Completely out of my comfort zone. I wanted to try something that was fun, something that grooved with a vibe that insists you accept the invitation to move along to the beat. With the help of long time friend Jason Foui this track came to life! What a vibe. Turn it up, roll the windows down and sing along.

You can find more of my music on all major platforms.

 

Live music at The VAT! Wait, what?

Jesse was born in the city of Lethbridge and raised to his teen years in the southern Alberta farming communities of Raymond and Fin Castle, AB. Jesse's early inspirations include the hypnotic sounds of big-name artists such as Jimi Hendrix, The Black Crowes, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, City and Colour, Jack Johnson, Guns 'N' Roses, and Pink Floyd. Jesse is a Blues/Rock/folk/Indie performer who has done his fair share of "paying his dues" opening and touring with such acts as: The Lazys, One Bad Son, Doc Walker, The Odds, The Northern Pikes, The Grapes Of Wrath, Monster Truck, The Age Of Electric, The Wild, Holly McNarland, Econoline Crush, Coal Creek Boys, Wild T & The Spirit, Cara Luft, Carson Cole, Clayton Bellamy (of The Road Hammers), Tupelo Honey, Retrograde, The Smalls, and Mcquaig to name just a few. In 2015 Jesse was awarded the title "Master of Blues Folk Rock" for the 6th Annual Black American Music Awards. Jesse is known for his funky heavy jam style guitar. Big riffs, an impressive vocal sound all his own and the ability to captivate the crowd with ease. His fans have coined the term "no string solo" as he can be consistently found ripping strings off the guitar like they aren't supposed to be there in the first place.

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Alberta

Brazilian cowboy to finish trek from Alaska to Calgary with Stampede honour

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CALGARY — Brazilian long rider Filipe Masetti Leite is almost at the finish line.

The 33-year-old is scheduled to complete a 3,400-kilometre journey on horseback from Alaska to Calgary today, the same day the Calgary Stampede was supposed to begin.

Although the annual event and a parade to kick it off were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Filipe Leite was crowned this year’s parade marshal.

He is to be met by Stampede officials and handed a marshal’s badge before receiving an RCMP escort to the exhibition grounds for a small ceremony.

Masetti Leite moved with his family from Brazil to Calgary when he was nine and later grew up in Toronto.

He has been on long horse rides before, but he says this one is to be his last so he can move on with new challenges.

“Sure enough the year I get picked to be the parade marshal — and it’s a huge honour — there’s no parade, no rodeo,” he says with a chuckle.

“But if this has taught me anything, it’s that you’ve got to be flexible. Someone, somewhere, wanted the Calgary Stampede to be cancelled when Filipe finished his ride, but I’m still blessed to be chosen.”

Masetti Leite covered about 16,000 kilometres riding from Calgary to his parents’ home of Espirito Santo do Pinhal, Sao Paulo, between 2012 and 2014. In 2016, he rode 7,350 kilometres from Brazil to Patagonia.

He says he was inspired to become a long rider by Aime Tschiffely, a Swiss school teacher who rode 16,000 kilometres alone from Buenos Aires to New York City in 1925 and wrote about his experiences.

Masetti Leite has also documented his travels and written the book “Long Ride Home: Guts and Guns and Grizzlies, 800 Days Through the Americas in a Saddle.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 3, 2020

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

RCMP deploying more Mounties in Alberta under agreement with the province

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EDMONTON — The RCMP says it will add 76 additional Mounties to Alberta this year, many of whom will serve as front-line police in rural detachments outside major municipalities.

There will also be 57 new civilian support positions.

RCMP say some of the additional Mounties are to serve in detachments at Beaverlodge, Edson, Evansburg, Mayerthorpe and Valleyview.

In the south, detachments in Airdrie, Cochrane, Okotoks and Strathmore will get more police.

New Mounties are to be assigned to the central district, including in Camrose, Blackfalds, Leduc, Morinville, Parkland, Rocky Mountain House, Stettler, Strathcona and Thorsby.

More RCMP are also being assigned to work in Athabasca, Bonnyville, Cold Lake, Elk Point and St. Paul.

Officials say the staffing increase is part of a five-year, $286-million policing agreement announced by the Alberta government in December.

“Rural Albertans asked for action against rising crime, and our government responded with Alberta’s largest single investment in policing since the RCMP’s March West,” Alberta Justice Minister Doug Schweitzer said Thursday in a release.

“Putting more boots on the ground in rural Alberta will help protect residents and ensure they feel safe in their communities.”

The force says so far it has filled 25 of the front-line positions in rural communities and 18 centralized police to provide support and specialized services to all rural detachments.

Deputy Commissioner Curtis Zablocki, Alberta’s top Mountie, said the additional funding is in response to concerns expressed by rural Alberta communities.

He said the RCMP is committed to continuing to provide Albertans with the high quality, modern provincial police service that they expect and deserve.

“The RCMP is committed to working in partnership with our communities to ensure Albertans feel safe in their homes, in their backyards and in their farm yards,” Zablocki said in a release.

Last month, Alberta’s government-appointed Fair Deal Panel recommended the province examine the idea of creating a provincial police force. The panel suggested the RCMP is becoming too bureaucratically inflexible and smaller communities aren’t getting enough front-line officers.

Premier Jason Kenney has said his government will study the recommendation.

Under the program announced by the province in December, small and rural communities, with some exceptions, are to begin contributing part of their front-line policing costs starting this year.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 2, 2020

The Canadian Press

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