Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"]

Community

Lloyd Lewis joins Cam’s Crew with Cam’s thoughts on Remembrance Day

Published

Lloyd joins the Crew to read Cam’s words on Remembrance Day.

Cam Tait is a newspaper columnist with 40 years of experience.  He lives with Cerebral Palsy and doesn’t speak clearly.  Cam has many stories.  He writes them and his friends read them on Cam’s Crew.

Here is Cam’s script:

THIS IS LLOYD LEWIS, PRESIDENT OF TODAYVILLE – AND I’M READING CAM TAIT’S WORDS ON CAM’S CREW.WHEN CONTEMPLATING WRITING THE ANNUAL EFFORT ATTEMPTING TO EXPRESS GRATITUDE AND APPRECIATION TO OUR MILITARY VETERANS ON NOVEMBER 11TH, DON CHERRY WASN’T A SPEC ON THE RADAR SCREEN.

THE THESIS, OF COURSE, IS TO HONOR CANADIAN VETERANS WHO SACRAFICED THEMSELVES SO WE CAN LIVE WITH FREEDOM IN 2019 … IT’S A REMINDER, TOO, OF THE ACTIVE CANADIAN MEN AND WOMEN IN THE FORCES, TODAY, NOT ONLY IN PEACEKEEPING ROLES … BUT WHO, IN A MOMENT’S NOTICE, ARE READY TO DEFEND OUR COUNTRY.

IT DOESN’T END THERE … IT’S A CHANCE TO SHARE THE STORIES OF PEOPLE LIKE LLOYD LEWIS, WHO MADE A POINT A MONTH AGO, HE WANTED TO VOICE
A REMEMBRANCE DAY SCRIPT IF I WAS GOING TO WRITE ONE.

LLOYD’S MILITARY CONNECTION COMES FROM GROWING UP AROUND MANY VETERANS FROM BOTH WORLD WARS IN THE TINY COMMUNITY OF FORT ASSINIBOINE ALBERTA … THEY HAD RETURNED TO THE AREA TO FARM.. AND THE LEGION WAS THE TOWN GATHERING PLACE.

A DISTINGUISHED TELEVISION CAREER CUED UP, WITH LLOYD LEAVING THE TV INDUSTRY IN 2015 AFTER A DECADE AS CTV EDMONTON VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER.

LLOYD HAS A DEEP APPRECIATION OF THE MILITARY … AND, IT SHOWS … HE IS HON. LT. COLONEL OF 41 SIGNAL REGIMENT.  IT’S A COMMUNICATIONS UNIT IN THE CANADIAN ARMY RESERVE IN ALBERTA WITH SOLDIERS IN 3 SQUADRONS – EDMONTON, RED DEER AND CALGARY.

LLOYD’S EXTENSIVE COMMUNITY RESUME INCLUDES BEING ON THE BOARD OF THE ALBERTA CHAPTER OF THE CANADIAN FORCES LIASON COUNCIL.

SUCH PRESTIGIOUS POSITIONS COME WITH CHALLENGING RESPONSIBILITIES … AND, AT THIS TIME OF YEAR, LLOYD PROMOTES HONOURING OUR MILITARY HEROS.

WHICH BRINGS US BACK TO DON CHERRY WHO IS IN HOT WATER FOR HIS SATURDAY NIGHT COACHES CORNER COMMENT … CHERRY HAS A VOICE, AND, AT 85, HE COMES FROM A GENERATION THAT HAS DEEP RESPECT FOR THE OUR MILITARY.

CHERRY MADE ONE POINT WE CAN AGREE ON … MORE OF US SHOULD BUY POPPIES.  IT’S A SMALL AND COLLECTIVE ACT – AND THE VERY LEAST WE CAN DO.  AND TODAY AT 11, STOP FOR A MOMENT … BE SILENT, AND THINK ABOUT YOUR FREEDOM … OUR FREEDOM.

LEST WE FORGET.
THIS IS LLOYD LEWIS … AND I’M ON THE CREW

 

CAM TAIT IS A NEWSPAPER COLUMNIST WITH 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. HE LIVES WITH CEREBRAL PALSY AND DOESN’T SPEAK CLEARLY. CAM HAS MANY STORIES. HE HAS WRITES THEM AND HIS FRIENDS READ THEM ON … CAM’S CREW.

Alberta

Four tips for preventing and handling Cyberbullying

Published

on

This article is published with permission from SOS SAFETY MAGAZINE.

NOVEMBER 30, 2019

Growing up in the digital age has both pros and cons. On one hand, your child has access to an enormous amount of information that can guide their learning and connect them with many opportunities. On the other hand, there are people who use the internet with cruel intent to harm others with minimal or no consequences.

Cyberbullying is one of the negative effects of being able to access the internet at our fingertips. Bullying that was once done at school and could be monitored is now happening at all times online.

To help prevent cyberbullying and properly handle cases of online harassment, here are 4 suggestions for parents to consider.

  1. Create Awareness

While kids may be aware that cyberbullying is occurring, parents are often left in the dark. Panda Security found that 76% of parents claimed their child has never been cyberbullied.

While such a large percentage of parents don’t think their child is being cyberbullied, stats on cyberbullying tell an entirely different story. The National Crime Prevention Center reported that 43% of teens were victims of cyberbullying in the last year and Pew Research Center found that 59% of teens have been a target of cyberbullying.

There is a clear gap between how often parents think cyberbullying is occurring and how much it actually is. In order to close this gap, there needs to be more awareness and understanding of the topic.

  1. Report Cyberbullies

With a screen hiding their identity, cyberbullies feel safe to harass without consequences. To combat this, we must encourage kids to report cyberbullies. There are a few reasons these bullies aren’t reported.

To start, there is a fear of retaliation. Kids would rather keep quiet than be labelled a snitch or accidentally encourage the bully to take further action. Many cyberbullies are kids from school so they may also fear an in-school issue if they report the online issue.

In addition to this, kids feel ashamed. Being a victim of mean comments can be embarrassing and hard to bring up to adults. Bullies play on people’s insecurities on purpose so that people will be less likely to report them.

While these worries and concerns aren’t something you, as a parent, can control, you can control your reaction when your child tells you about a bully. A common fear many kids have is of how an adult will react or if they will be believed. Reassuring your child of your support will help them feel comfortable reporting these cyberbullies.

  1. Take the Right Action

If your child told you they were cyberbullied, how would you react? When surveyed about reacting to a cyberbully on social media, 73% of parents said they would block the bully’s profile, 56% would report them to the social platform and 50% would file a complaint with the school.

While 58% of parents would reach out to the bully’s parents, only 24% would reach out to the bully directly. This shows that there may not be a proper consequence given to the bully.

Taking the right action is important so that the bully knows what they did is wrong. If the cyberbully isn’t directly addressed and reported, they could continue harassing other kids. Be sure you’re aware of the laws and regulations for bullying in your state.

  1. Have Open Conversations

One of the most important things you can do is to have an open conversation with your child about cyberbullying. Panda Security found that 41% of parents have never had a conversation with their child about bullying. Of these parents who haven’t had a conversation with their kids about cyberbullying, 51% were dads and 65% were moms.

Parents would rather regulate their children’s online activity than have an open discussion with them. While regulations can help, there are many ways that kids can get around them. In addition, online monitoring doesn’t catch everything.

Keeping an open dialogue about bullying will help your kids feel more comfortable coming to you if there ever is an issue. Taking this preventative measure is healthier than simply being reactionary.

To open up this conversation, here are 8 suggestions for talking about cyberbullying. 

  • Talk about how you read about a rise in cyberbullying and stats that go along with it.
  • Discuss examples of cyberbullying that you’ve witnessed or heard of.
  • Ask if your kid has witnessed cyberbullying. Rather than directly asking if they have been a victim, let them open up about a friend or classmate.
  • Assure them that if they were cyberbullying you would want to know so that you could support them.
  • Let them know your policy on cyberbullying. What exactly would you do if they were cyberbullied and what would you do if they were caught being a bully.
  • Emphasize how important it is to keep their device safe and secure.
  • Be open with them about how you plan on monitoring their device to keep it safe.
  • Ensure that your child knows that they have your support and you’re on their team.

Cyberbullying is an issue that many parents are facing or might face in the future. Being prepared and letting your child know you are there for them can make all the difference.

Learn more about SOS Safety Magazine, an amazing free resource in our community.

Continue Reading

Community

Edmonton Valley Zoo joins effort to protect endangered frogs

Published

on

from City of Edmonton

Edmonton Valley Zoo joins effort to protect endangered frogs

December 4, 2019

The Edmonton Valley Zoo is leaping at the chance to be part of a program to save northern leopard frogs from extinction.

The Zoo received 22 of the highly endangered frogs and plans to establish a permanent conservation breeding population here in Edmonton. The offspring will be released in a targeted location in British Columbia with the goal of bringing the species back from the edge of extinction. In British Columbia, there is only a single remaining native population of northern leopard frogs located in the Creston Valley, but this population is vulnerable to extinction from habitat loss, disease and invasive species.

Northern Leopard Frog

The five-month-old frogs came from the Calgary Zoo and are in quarantine at the Edmonton Valley Zoo. Next year they will move into a new public enclosure. Once the frogs begin breeding, their offspring will be relocated to the Columbia Marshes in southeast British Columbia to help re-establish a wild population.

“Our zoo team has proven expertise in caring for several endangered frog species, so we felt we could make a substantial contribution to this important conservation project,” said Lindsey Galloway, Director of the Edmonton Valley Zoo. “Frogs play an important role in our ecosystems. One third of the world’s amphibian species are at risk of extinction and by playing a role in this program, we can help one species recover.”

In addition to the northern leopard frogs, the zoo is home to 13 other species of amphibians.

“We started to care for amphibians in 2008 to bring attention to the biggest extinction event since the dinosaurs,” said zookeeper Wayne Woods. “Since 2008 we have bred numerous species including the critically endangered golden mantella from Madagascar.”

Northern leopard frog populations in western Canada declined sharply in the 1970s and are listed federally as an endangered species in British Columbia. This new Edmonton population will support the reintroduction breeding program, part of the British Columbia Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team. In addition to the Edmonton Valley Zoo, the recovery team includes the Calgary Zoo, the Vancouver Aquarium, local biologists, indigenous groups and representatives from the Government of British Columbia.

“Edmonton Valley Zoo is working hard to find new ways to help at-risk species,” said Galloway. “Our goal is to inspire our 400,000 annual visitors to become advocates for conservation. In addition, we are home to 14 endangered species, such as Amur Tigers and Grevy’s Zebra, and participate in Species Survival Plans that support genetic diversity. With this northern leopard frog program, we get to put animals back in the wild.”

Frogs around the world are important indicators of wetland health. Frog species are very adaptable so when populations decline it is a sure sign something is wrong in the ecosystem and other living things in the habitat may be in jeopardy. Northern leopard frogs are genetically distinct from other species found in Canada and are vulnerable to habitat loss and disease. Two additional populations have already been reintroduced to the wild as part of the program.

 

Continue Reading

Trending

X