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Alberta

Homes by 3Leafs showcases the first single family, shipping container home built in Calgary.

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Homes by 3Leafs showcases the first single family, shipping container home built in Calgary. The Alberta based company is changing how homes are constructed by transforming recycled steel containers into high performance, energy efficient homes with net zero capabilities.

September 19, 2019, Calgary, AB ​Homes by 3Leafs gave media an exclusive inside look into the sleek, elegant modern two-storey home made from four recycled shipping containers. The home is nestled in the eco-friendly community, Echohaven, in northwest Calgary.

Som Sourachit, C.E.O. of Homes by 3Leafs describes this moment as pivotal. “Our high performance, energy efficient houses reduce waste in landfills by repurposing steel shipping containers into dream homes. The houses have net zero capabilities and are the new blueprint for how we should build while protecting our environment. “

It’s estimated there are millions of shipping containers piling up in landfills worldwide. The repurposed containers make the perfect envelope for a home, and reduce the heavy reliance on trees used for construction. The steel means shipping container homes are sturdier and will last for generations with fewer repairs than traditional stick builds over time.

The homeowner, Jaime Turner, added “This is a teaching moment for my young daughter. We wanted to build a legacy for her. This is our forever home and we know because it’s made of steel it will last for generations, and an added bonus is, we are being good to our environment!”

Homes by 3Leafs is proud to be leading the way in new home construction. Currently, 6 building projects are underway.

About Homes by 3Leafs

Homes by 3Leafs is a global company based in Edmonton and is comprised of a team of architects, construction experts, designers, and engineers with years of experience developing stunning homes. By using shipping containers to build, Homes by 3Leafs is committed to saving the environment. Thousands of containers pile up in landfills unused while forests can’t be cut down fast enough to support the robust construction industry. The company leads the way with cutting edge technology and new innovations to help the world build beautiful sustainable homes to last hundreds of years.

Todayville is an independently-owned digital media company. We specialize in helping community groups, local businesses and organizations tell their story. Our team has years of media and video production experience. Talk to us about advertising, brand journalism stories, opinion pieces, event promotion, or other ideas you have to make our product better. We also operation Todayville Red Deer and Todayville Agriculture.

Alberta

Business case for Regional Transit Service released

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Joint release from the Cities of Edmonton and St. Albert

January 22, 2020

Today, the team of elected representatives tasked with examining the feasibility of a Regional Transit Services Commission (RTSC) in the Edmonton Metro Region released their report: “Accelerating Transit in the Edmonton Metropolitan Region: Building a Regional Transit Services Commission.”

The RTSC report recommends combining transit services of 13 municipalities.This would create more opportunities for inter-municipal travel, with projected savings of 850 service hours per week and $3 million per year once systems are fully aligned in 2026. The report was led by a transition team of representatives from the 13 municipalities in the Edmonton Metropolitan Region.

“We want to provide people living in the region the best possible transit experience we can,” said City of St. Albert Councillor Wes Brodhead, chair of the RTSC transition team. “With a plan to address integrated regional transit, we can try to close the gap between transit and automobile trips, while decreasing congestion and giving everyone the ability to experience what the region has to offer.”

The aim of the RTSC would be to improve mobility options and the movement of people across our rapidly growing region. As reflected in the report, uniting transit services across regional boundaries will allow for a more efficient and cost effective transit service, while reducing barriers to entry for communities that want to start a new transit service and eliminating the need for duplication of services along key corridors.

“As the Edmonton Metropolitan Region becomes more interconnected and complex, doing more of the same to meet the region’s mobility needs will not be sustainable over the long term,” said City of Edmonton Councillor Michael Walters, vice-chair of the transition team. “With the region growing at such a rapid pace, we need to take a critical look at how we can better serve the next million people through transit options.”

Mobility in the Edmonton Metropolitan Region is transforming. According to the 2015 Edmonton Regional Household Travel Survey, the number of daily transit trips in the region has increased by almost 9,000 since 2005, while the number of automobile trips has increased by about 236,000. That represents one transit trip for every 26 automobile trips.

“Jurisdictional boundaries shouldn’t limit how our citizens live, learn, work and play. People around the region want and need to move seamlessly,” said Councillor Walters. “Delivering transit in a collaborative and streamlined manner lets us meet challenges head-on and take advantage of opportunities today and into the future – together.”

In February and March 2020, the individual councils of all 13 Edmonton Metropolitan Region municipalities will vote on their decision to participate in a formal request to the Government of Alberta to create a new Regional Transit Commission.

For those who choose to join, work will begin in early 2020 to seek approval from the Government of Alberta and perform the planning required to begin delivering regional transit services in 2022.

The RTSC Transition Team, made up of councillors from 13 municipalities, led the formation of the report. The 13 municipalities included are the City of Beaumont, the Town of Devon, the City of Edmonton, the City of Fort Saskatchewan, the City of Leduc, Leduc County, the Town of Morinville, Parkland County, the City of Spruce Grove, the City of St. Albert, the Town of Stony Plain, Strathcona County and Sturgeon County.

 

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Alberta

Province defends post-secondary funding changes. Says United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong using performance-based funding

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Minister Nicolaides meets with student leaders prior to announcing a new post-secondary funding announcement.

From The Province of Alberta

Transforming post-secondary funding

A new outcomes-based post-secondary funding approach will increase transparency and accountability and help build a modern and diverse workforce for the future.

Under the new funding model, a portion of government funding to colleges, universities and polytechnics will be based on achieving key performance measures. Performance measures will encourage institutions to improve services, increase efficiencies and create opportunities for Albertans through strong labour market outcomes and innovative programs and research.

“This is a new and completely transformative funding model for our universities, colleges and polytechnics. Our new approach will help ensure students are set up for success by encouraging institutions to produce job-ready graduates. Students make a significant investment in their post-secondary education, and it is essential we do everything possible to give them a rewarding career at the end of their studies. By shifting the focus to performance, we will ensure taxpayer dollars are being used in the most responsible way possible.”

Demetrios Nicolaides, Minister of Advanced Education

“The University of Calgary has the ability to create the ‘arc to the future’ for Calgary and help re-imagine Alberta. The outcomes-based funding model is not only a tremendous opportunity to transform our post-secondary system, but to graduate a workforce that is capable of adaptation, with the skills and abilities to innovate and to support economic growth and diversification.”

Geeta Sankappanavar, chair, Board of Governors, University of Calgary

“We look forward to working with government to implement the new outcomes-based approach to funding. This approach should improve predictability in government funding levels and enhance accountability for results delivery, both of which will benefit our students.”

Dave Collyer, chair, Board of Governors, Bow Valley College

“Alberta’s post-secondary presidents welcome the opportunity to work with the Government of Alberta, our learners and other stakeholders in building a performance-based model that will enable us to achieve an overall vision for Alberta’s post-secondary system, that builds on the strengths and core mission of each institution, and that maximizes the quality of our learning and research environments so that learners and communities can reach their highest potential.”

Neil Fassina, president of the Council of Post-secondary Presidents of Alberta and president of Athabasca University

“Alberta’s students deserve an institutional funding model that is both modern and evidence-based. ASEC supports the changes made by the Government of Alberta towards a model that fits our values of transparency, accountability, affordability and predictability. We look forward to working with the government in the further development of the Campus Alberta Grant allocation.”

Emmanauel Barker, director, Government Relations and Advocacy, Alberta Students’ Executive Council

In addition to tying public investment to results, government is also transforming its relationship with post-secondary institutions by negotiating three-year funding agreements. Investment management agreements will include specific performance targets for each institution. They will also specify the government funding each institution will receive if they meet their performance targets. Three-year terms will help institutions plan for the future and build on their record of excellence.

The amount of funding tied to performance outcomes will begin at 15 per cent of operational funding for 2020-21 and gradually increase to a maximum of 40 per cent by 2022-23. A small number of performance measures will be introduced for the 2020-21 academic year, and more measures will be gradually introduced over the next three years to a total of about 15.

 Quick facts

  • Government provides operational funding to 26 universities, colleges and polytechnics every year, but historically, this funding has not been tied to any targets or outcomes. While government provides many different kinds of grants to post-secondary institutions, only operational funding through the Campus Alberta Grant will be tied to performance.
  • The MacKinnon Report identified that the current post-secondary funding structure does not link funding to the achievement of specific goals or priorities for the province, such as ensuring the required skills for the current and future labour market.
  • Outcomes-based funding is a global trend in higher education. About 35 U.S. states use a form of performance-based funding. Over the past 10 years, additional jurisdictions have implemented various methods of performance-based funding, such as the United Kingdom, Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Poland, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong.
  • While performance measures will be finalized after discussions with post-secondary institutions, students and faculty, some examples may include:
    • graduate employment rate
    • median graduate income
    • graduate skills and competencies
    • work-integrated learning opportunities
    • administrative expense ratio
    • sponsored research revenue
    • enrolment (including potential targets for domestic students, international students and under-represented learners)
  • Performance measures will also be weighted differently depending on the institution. For example, different performance measures will be more important to different kinds of institutions.
  • Institutions that meet all of their targets will receive 100 per cent of their allocated funding.
  • If an institution does not meet its targets, the institution will receive funding that is proportionate to its level of achievement. For example, if an institution achieves 90 per cent of its target, it will receive 90 per cent of its funding for that target.

 

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