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Alberta

Breton/Thorsby RCMP lay charges following firearms incident

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2 minute read

Sept. 11, 2020

Breton/Thorsby RCMP lay charges following firearms incident

Brazeau County, Alta. – The RCMP took one male into custody following an incident reported on Sept. 8 that shots were fired at a farmer’s vehicle.

At 10:00 p.m., the RCMP responded to a 911 call on Range Road 63 and Township Road 474.  Investigation led RCMP to believe that a suspect male got out of his truck and fired a gun at another male’s vehicle.  The farmer being shot at fled in his vehicle and called 911. The farmer was not injured.

Neighbourhood enquiries led the RCMP to locate the suspect truck and identify the male as Gavin Gregory Annett (41), who lived at a nearby residence.

On Sept. 10, Annett was arrested without incident, with the assistance of the RCMP Emergency Response Team (ERT).  A search warrant was executed on his property, and charges were laid.

For the incident of Sept. 8, Annett is facing nine criminal charges including point a firearm, assault with a weapon, fail to comply with a release order, et al.

During the course of this investigation, prior offences were revealed relating to a different male victim.  These offences were alleged to have occurred in Brazeau County on August 5.  Annett is facing an addition nine criminal charges including point a firearm, possession of a firearm while prohibited, uttering threats, extortion with a firearm, et al.

Annett did not speak to bail and remains in custody. His next scheduled court date is September 17, 2020, in Leduc Provincial Court.

The investigation into these incidents remains ongoing.

Alberta

Premier Smith announces plan to boost Alberta’s Heritage Fund to at least 250 Billion by 2050

Published on

From CPAC on YouTube

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith delivers state-of-the-province address

In a televised address from Edmonton, Danielle Smith, the premier of Alberta, delivers an update on her government’s vision and legislative priorities.

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Alberta

Alberta looking to ban electronic vote tabulators ahead of next provincial election

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From LifeSiteNews

By Anthony Murdoch

electronic voting tabulators, which were supposed to speed up vote counting, instead saw election results delayed due with workers having to manually enter the results that each tabulator printed out.

The conservative Premier of Alberta, Danielle Smith, has confirmed she is looking to ban the use of electronic vote tabulators in future provincial elections after issues with them in the 2023 election saw massive delays in the tallying of votes.  

Smith, according to a report from True North, while speaking to a United Conservative Party (UCP) fundraiser on January 26 in the community of Bonnyville was asked if she would “end the use of voting tabulators across the province?” 

Smith replied with a firm “yes.” 

The 2023 Alberta provincial elections held in May saw Smith and her UCP win a majority, although a slim one, over the left-wing Alberta New Democratic Party (NDP).

Elections Alberta used what is called a Vote Anywhere Service, which allowed anyone to vote at any voting place regardless of which riding (jurisdiction) they were actually voting in. While paper ballots were used for the election, electronic tabulators were used to count the votes from all hand ballots. A form was then printed out with the result of each riding from the tabulators count of the hand ballots.  

However, the electronic voting tabulators, which were supposed to speed up vote counting, instead saw election results delayed due with workers having to manually enter the results that each tabulator printed out.  

Elections Alberta noted in June 2023, per True North, that “[w]e did not use any electronic data transfer from the tabulators, as the tabulators used for advance voting were never connected to a network at any time.” 

“As a result, it was a manual process to verify and enter these results.”  

As for Smith, before the 2023 election, she noted that she was confident in Elections Alberta’s plan to use electronic tabulators, as “we have the ability to do a hand count as a follow up in the event there are close results, I believe that’s going to be sufficient.” 

“That’s, I think, something that people expect in democracy – that you should be able to verify a vote if results end up very close,” she added.  

Elections Alberta, however, has pushed back on returning to hand counting ballots, saying it would increase the manual workload of employees.

There were many close results on election night, with the NDP losing a few seats by only a handful of votes in some Calgary ridings.  

Smith gave no timeline as to how or when she would make the change.

Many large municipalities in Alberta, including the province’s two biggest cities, Calgary and Edmonton, use electronic tabulators for ballot counting.

Issues surrounding electronic voting machines as well as tabulators came to a head in the aftermath of the 2020 U.S. presidential election, which saw Joe Biden declared the winner over Donald Trump. 

A report published by LifeSiteNews last year documented how a computer programmer, Clinton Eugene Curtis, who had previously testified to Congress on the integrity of voting machines, warned lawmakers in Arizona to never trust them.  

“Don’t use machines, because you can never, ever trust them to give you a fair election,” said Curtis. 

“There are too many ways to hack them. You can hack them at the level that I did when you first build them, you can hack them from the outside, you can hack them with programs that load themselves on the side. It’s impossible to secure them. You will never beat the programmer. The programmer always owns the universe.”  

Of note is that Curtis is a Democrat who had worked as a programmer for NASA, as well as the Department of Defense and other government agencies.

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