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Alberta

The App Built for Gig-Workers – Skilli 2.0

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3 minute read

Gig economy

Hearing more and more about the growth of the gig economy across Canada, parallel with the mass layoffs due to the pandemic, beckons the question, is gig work on route to become the new normal? 

Where we might find solace as an employee, the real narrative that should be shared in the freelance world is in the word itself, “free”. If you consider your previous work experience, whether it be hands-on, online or over the phone, you may have technical skills that could provide real value to another individual or business. 

The scary part? 

Not having the security of guaranteed income instills fear in every working professional. However, with the right support platform, setting your own schedule and building a brand around yourself offers far more pros than cons. 

gig worker

Tutors are just one of many categories of services available on the Skilli 2.0 app.

The team at Skilli has developed a new app to serve individuals who are growing the gig economy in Canada. The app allows for a freelancer to create a personalized profile, promote their educational accreditation, share what you intend to offer as a service to potential customers and access a direct contact form. 

For freelancers, the app can be far more than a stagnant promotion page, it allows you to keep track of leads, interact with potential clients, and get recognition for your work. You can learn more about how to get started by visiting their Help Center. With any industry there is always competition, the Skilli app offers a new innovative method to get hired for freelance and contract jobs that mitigates the risk for the customer. 

In conversation with their CEO, Karshil Desai, he speaks on how Skilli 2.0 was created to put the service provider first. 

“Our technology and our business model allows us to be the preferred platform for the gig-economy. The app features are designed to make the lives of Service Providers simpler and more efficient, resulting in a greater quality of work. We are empowering our communities to make smarter and more informed decisions to get work done quickly and more efficiently.”

Think about it, by putting a major focus on transparency and security for service providers, ultimately customers will receive a higher quality of service. Customers can then view previous accomplishments and seek their preferred service provider.

Launching on the App Store and Google Play from February 15th, the new Skilli app is a freelancer’s best friend. If you would like to learn more about Skilli and their support for gig workers, check out their website or their social media below. 

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For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary

Alberta

Alberta to bring in another five million bottles of children’s pain medication

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The Alberta government says it has secured another five million bottles of children’s medication to manage fever and pain.

Premier Danielle Smith says the government is working with Alberta Health Services and Health Canada to bring in the pediatric acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

Parents across Canada have been scrambling to manage their children’s fever and pain as rates of respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, and influenza skyrocket amid a dire shortage of the medications.

Smith says overwhelmed parents can feel confident the government is moving as quickly as it can to bring in the medication and get it to pharmacies across the province.

The federal government also imported one million units of children’s acetaminophen — commonly known as Tylenol — across the country late last month.

Health Canada has distributed the children’s Tylenol to retailers and has also sent children’s ibuprofen — commonly known as Advil — to hospitals.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

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Alberta

CannTrust CEO was warned over illicit pot growing: former compliance worker

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TORONTO — A former director of quality and compliance at CannTrust Holdings Inc. says he warned the company’s chief executive that Health Canada could levy penalties if the firm grew pot in unlicensed rooms at its Niagara, Ont. facility.

In the months leading up to Health Canada finding pot growing in unlicensed rooms, Graham Lee said Tuesday that he told Peter Aceto he couldn’t say what the exact consequences could be, but knew the government regulator had previously issued warning letters and handed out penalties.

For example, Lee said Health Canada reviewed CannTrust’s inventory more extensively after it discovered the company using a storage facility at its Vaughan, Ont. location contrary to licensing.

“In general, Health Canada was there every day checking up on the inventory,” Lee recalled.

His comments were made at the Old City Hall courthouse in Toronto in response to questioning from Dihim Emami, a lawyer representing the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) in a case aiming to prove Aceto and other former CannTrust executives are guilty of several offences related to unlicensed growing at the Niagara facility.

Aceto, former CannTrust chairman Eric Paul and former vice-chairman Mark Litwin have pleaded not guilty to fraud and authorizing, permitting or acquiescing in the commission of an offence.

Litwin and Paul are also facing insider trading charges, and Litwin and Aceto are charged with making a false prospectus and false preliminary prospectus.

The OSC and Royal Canadian Mounted Police allege Litwin, Aceto and Paul did not disclose to investors that about 50 per cent of the growing space at CannTrust’s Pelham, Ont. facility in the Niagara area was not licensed by Health Canada. They say the men used corporate disclosures to assert that they were compliant with regulatory approvals.

They also allege that Litwin and Aceto signed off on prospectuses used to raise money in the U.S., which stated that CannTrust was fully licensed and compliant with regulatory requirements, and that Litwin and Paul traded shares of CannTrust while in possession of material, undisclosed information regarding the unlicensed growing.

The men no longer work for CannTrust and their lawyers are arguing their clients are all innocent.

Frank Addario, Aceto’s lawyer, previously told The Canadian Press his client was hired because of his financial acumen and track record. Before his time at CannTrust, Aceto was the president and chief executive of ING Direct Canada.

Addario also pointed out that CannTrust was subject to inspections and financial audits that uncovered no material issues.

“The evidence will show Peter Aceto behaved legally and with integrity during his time at CannTrust,” Addario said in an email.

However, Lee testified Monday that the growth of cannabis in unlicensed rooms was “very openly discussed” at the pot company.

“There was no hiding this. There was no denial of this,” he said.

On Tuesday, he reinforced those allegations, describing how he brought up his concerns about unlicensed activity during at least one meeting in winter 2019 that he recalled Aceto attended.

“I noticed that no one in the room was referring to or cognizant of the fact that these were unlicensed areas, so I reminded them,” Lee said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

Tara Deschamps, The Canadian Press

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