Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

Response: This Is Why Geothermal Should Be Our First Choice When It Comes To An Energy Transition

Published

4 minute read

I write in response to “CBC News Poll: Why the economic crisis could speed up transition to renewable energy” published recently:

(see: CBC News poll: Why the economic crisis could speed up transition to renewable energy)

Geothermal is the missing link in Earth’s energy mix. It’s the only scalable solution that is both clean and baseload. Without a clean baseload power source, the grid will struggle to replace all the legacy coal, gas and nuclear power, with just intermittent sources like wind and solar (even with better batteries than exist today).

Geothermal, however, can fill this gap. More importantly, we can do this not by importing windmills, solar panels and batteries from China, but by building on the same world-leading assets and expertise that sit idle in the oil service industry today. We can lead the world simply by using this expertise to convert our old abandoned well sites to geothermal use.

Even better, Eavor’s “made in Canada” solution (which is available to any Canadian developer), facilitates rapid scaling. In particular, Eavor’s technology eliminates or vastly reduces the need for exploration uncertainties, delays and costs. It also transforms geothermal from baseload to dispatchable. This allows Eavor to work much more synergistically with wind and solar where needed. Eavor’s technology, known as “Eavor-Loop™”, works by drilling a sealed well-bore loop which gently harvests geothermal heat over a large surface area simply through conduction. Without the need for a geothermal aquifer, this enables implementation almost anywhere in the world. In line with this, Eavor has assembled a multi-year, multi-billion-dollar prospect pipeline. These prospects are, however, all outside of Western Canada.

What will it take to enable Eavor, and other Canadian geothermal developers like Terrapin and DEEP, to bring this geothermal revolution home? The same thing that has nurtured successful and growing geothermal industries elsewhere – a combination of early grants and energy pricing that recognizes the advantages of green baseload power. Ideally these incentives would be modeled after the SDE+ system in the Netherlands, which is more efficient, but has the same net effect as a Feed-in-Tariff.

Our calculations are that, a geothermal “Moon Shot” for Western Canada with the above incentives, could easily attract $4 billion in foreign investment capital, to create 400 MW of clean, dispatchable power, all the while employing 5,500 oil service workers for 4 years. Larger plans could employ 25,000 for a decade or more. Such a plan would create a geothermal ecosystem in Canada that could lead the world and represent an entire new clean export industry. At Eavor, we believe that is a vision worth getting excited about. In short, the current situation doesn’t have to devolve into a fight between oil industry jobs or renewables. It doesn’t have to be a zero-sum game. With geothermal solutions like Eavor the same investment dollar can protect oil service jobs and improve the environment all at the same time.

To learn more about Eavor visit Eavor

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary

Follow Author

Alberta

Edmonton hopes for NHL hub-city benefits, welcomes Western Conference playoffs

Published on

EDMONTON — Across the street from Rogers Place, a pub patio was prepped with picnic tables and television screens slung above them Friday.

On the eve of the 2020 NHL playoffs, numerous downtown Edmonton eateries had outdoor spaces ready for whatever being an NHL hub city could bring them.

What kind of buzz and business a dozen Western Conference teams cloistered in town could generate was yet to be known, but they wanted to be ready.

“It has to stimulate the economy somehow,” said Edmontonian Khaleed Valani. “Honestly, I’m just glad to have hockey back.”

A corridor of blue netting slashed through the downtown core and closed off a street south of the arena. 

Six of the teams staying at one of the two designated hotels use it for shielded passage to Rogers Place.

The players’ recreation area in the lee of the other hotel and Rogers Place is also walled off by blue netting.

You can hear music, see basketballs hitting backboards and silhouettes of players sitting at tables, but you wouldn’t be able to point out Edmonton Oilers star Connor McDavid eating ice cream.

Edmonton has been a notoriously tough sell to the NHL’s free agents in the past, but Valani believes players from other teams will get a more favourable impression of the city this summer that could pay off for the Oilers down the road.

“All the teams here, they’re going to see the great city, they’re going to see the great weather,” he said.

“Playing with Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl I think a lot of players are going to come and they’re going to want to be a part of Edmonton.”

There’s certainly pride in Alberta’s capital city that it, along with Toronto, was chosen from 10 candidate cities to host the NHL playoffs.

Edmonton’s low rates of COVID-19 infection relative to other NHL cities and a barely four-year-old arena with expansive back-of-house space ultimately earned the city an unprecedented hockey tournament.

“Edmonton was picked due to us being a lot safer than other cities and all the stuff that Albertans and Edmontonians have done to make this all happen,” Basil Hendsbee said.

He sees the tournament as one big TV tourism ad for his town.

“The more things they show the viewers at home what Edmonton has to offer, who knows?” Hendsbee said. “Maybe people will come after COVID is done and visit Edmonton and Alberta.”

How much can and will Edmontonians publicly celebrate their hub-city crown, given the constant messaging of social distancing and encouragement to stay home?

Games played in an empty arena and the teams walled off from the public, the citizenry won’t be a lot closer to the action than other Canadians watching at home on television.

Arriving from the south on the Queen Elizabeth II — known as the ‘QE2’ — the first indication of a major hockey event in the city is a four-metre-high, 340-kilogram Stanley Cup replica at the edge of a sports store parking lot.

Staff at United Sport and Cycle were unpacking not only Oilers gear, but jerseys, T-shirts and flags for all the participating teams Friday.

The store is banking on Edmontonians feeling free, or emboldened, to support more teams than just the Oilers with so many of the teams in town.

“We’ve actually talked to a couple people who said ‘I need to plan because I need to wear my Oilers jersey at eleven o’clock and I need to wear my Avalanche jersey next,'” marketing manager Kelly Hodgson said. 

“They’re preparing to be a hockey fan and not just an Oilers fan. We see Toronto fans coming in even though Toronto’s not playing here.”

Hodgson is confident the NHL’s plan to contain the virus and finish the 2019-20 season in Edmonton will work.

“We had to actually make a delivery into the bubble because they needed some sock tape from us for the players to wear,” he said.

“I’m the one that made the delivery and you could have got into Alcatraz easier than you could have got into that bubble.”

This report by the Canadian Press was first published July 31, 2020.

Follow @DLSpencer10

Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Canadian fans ready to embrace return of NHL in season restart amid summer heat

Published on

EDMONTON — As the summer heat shimmers off the pavement and stationary cars double as sweltering four-door Dutch ovens, Canada’s favourite winter pastime is officially back.

The National Hockey League begins its ground-breaking, five-round elimination  tournament Saturday with 24 teams split between Edmonton and Toronto.

The question is whether fans, finally able to enjoy the outdoors in this year of isolation, masks, and misery, will tune in to watch computer enhanced hockey beamed in from empty hub-bubbled arenas during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Clay Imoo, a Vancouver-based Canucks superfan, says any time is a good time for hockey.

“It’s a bit strange seeing (the games) on TV, admittedly, at the end of July, early August, but as a season-ticket holder for the past 10 years I’m absolutely thrilled,” Imoo, 46, said Friday in an interview.

“It’s needed right now. There’s a lot of crazy stuff going on. There’s other priorities in the world, for sure, but I think it’s also a nice way to get some normalcy back.”

Imoo runs a YouTube video blog, with analysis, chat, and irreverent song parodies on all things Canuck.

When Vancouver faces off against the Minnesota Wild on Sunday in Edmonton, he plans to be home watching with his family, wearing his favourite team jersey (a retro black, red and yellow version with the swooshy hockey skate logo and Quinn Hughes’ number 43 on the back).

Six Canadian teams are in the hunt for the Stanley Cup: the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Canadiens are playing in the Eastern Conference bubble in Toronto while the Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames, Winnipeg Jets and Canucks are isolating in safe zones around Rogers Place in Edmonton’s downtown.

Calgary is playing Winnipeg, guaranteeing at least one Canadian team will be in the sweet-16 round, which is the start of the traditional playoffs.

No fans are allowed in the arenas. Tarps drape the seats in the lower bowls. Massive video screens hang from the ceilings along with a camera affixed to the end of a gyrating, swooping, boom to deliver funky angled shots of the action.

Fans will see an enhanced experience, including canned cheers and applause when the “home” team scores.

Canada has been socially distanced from Stanley’s mug for close to a generation, with the Montreal Canadiens the last team to hoist the championship trophy in 1993. But regardless of watching to see if Canada can regain the cup, the question remains: who the heck wants to watch hockey on TV in August?

Actually, quite a few Canadians do, said Dave Korzinski, research director for pollster Angus Reid Institute.

Angus Reid surveyed 1,519 Canadians online in late July and, of those, 518 said they traditionally watch playoff hockey.

Of the 518, about 72 reported they were jazzed or very jazzed to watch bubble hockey while the rest said they can take it or leave it or don’t care.

Sportsnet says 4.3 million Canadians caught some part of Tuesday’s exhibition doubleheader, featuring a Maple Leafs-Canadiens game in Toronto, and the Oilers against the Calgary Flames in Edmonton. The network says they were the most watched exhibition games in Sportsnet history.

“You’ve got about a quarter of people who are very excited for this,” said Korzinski in an interview.

“That group is really engaged and ready to rock.”

Age wise, the poll suggests younger fans are more engaged in this unusual summer format than those 55 years or older. Of the 55-plus set, 36 per cent said they don’t care to watch shinny in the dead of summer. (Hey you millionaire hockey kids, get off my lawn.)

Korzinski said the results come with all kinds of caveats.

If the Leafs get knocked out in the elimination round by the Columbus Blue Jackets, for example, that clicking sound you hear could be TV sets shutting off all across central Canada.

But maybe the Leafs lose and the Connor McDavid-Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Oilers scoring machine goes on a deep playoff run and captures the national imagination. Click. The sets are back on.

The other factor, Korzinski said, is while hockey in the August heat may not be ideal, exciting playoff matchups in September as the leaves fall and the nights get chilly could be just what Canada needs.

“I think you could see a lot of momentum for this tournament as it goes along,” he said.

The NHL acknowledges it’s in uncharted territory by running a five-round tournament while dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic. The league suspended play in mid-March as the regular season was winding down.

The Stanley Cup final, set for Edmonton, won’t even begin until late September.

The league is being super-careful to ensure COVID doesn’t breach the hub-bubbles.

Media members covering the games get regular temperature checks and sit, masked up and isolated, high and alone in the rinks. Post game in Edmonton, they walk down the concourse to curtained-off areas where they can ask questions of players appearing on a Zoom screen. Coffee and water are free. Hot dogs are $6.

But it’s not as if hockey in the heat is unusual.

The NHL has, ironically, gradually conditioned fans for this over the decades by extending this traditional winter sport longer and longer into the late spring and early summer.

Also, some of Canada’s greatest hockey memories have come when the sun is still high in the sky.

In September 1972, Paul Henderson scored the greatest goal in Canadian hockey history (an incontestable fact; don’t @ me) when Team Canada beat the Soviet Union in the final game of their Summit Series.

In September 1987, Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux worked a give and go for the ages to edge the Soviets in the Canada Cup final.

While the opening weekend will answer some questions, others linger.

How will this affect Toronto fans planning the Cup parade route as soon as the Leafs win their first playoff game?

What will the cup celebration look like? How surreal will if all players spray each other with champagne on Zoom when the cup is won?

How will this affect the game long-term and how fans interact with it?

Change is inevitable, said Korzinski, as we all try to imagine a future where it’s once again safe to sit cheek by jowl with 19,000 fans to yell, cheer, and be gloriously free to jostle for T-shirts cannon-launched at us from below by fuzzy-headed mascots.

“This might be a bit of a new normal. It will be interesting to see how the NHL leverages it and how this initial experiment goes,” he said.

If nothing else, a Canadian win would be ironic and poetic punctuation to a Kafkaesque year of COVID surrealism: only after we closed the entire U.S. border was Lord Stanley finally able to come home.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 31, 2020.

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading
;

july, 2020

No Events

Trending

X