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Alberta

COASTAL GASLINK PIPELINE PROJECT SETS NEW STANDARD WITH UNPRECEDENTED INDIGENOUS SUPPORT AND PARTICIPATION

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COASTAL GASLINK PIPELINE PROJECT SETS NEW STANDARD WITH UNPRECEDENTED INDIGENOUS SUPPORT AND PARTICIPATION

Coastal GasLink (CGL) is a 670-kilometre pipeline that will deliver natural gas from northeastern British Columbia to LNG Canada’s export terminal in Kitimat, B.C. As part of Coastal GasLink’s commitment to ensuring Indigenous and local communities are able to fully benefit from the construction and operation of the pipeline, we successfully negotiated 20 project and community agreements that clearly demonstrate our commitment to their communities for the long-term.

The Coastal GasLink Pipeline Project has set a new standard for Indigenous engagement and participation in critical energy infrastructure project development and construction. Since the project was first announced in 2012, thousands of hours have gone into listening and collaborating with Indigenous and local communities to create a project that is delivering on environmental and cultural protection, including $1-billion in long-term economic benefits through jobs and contracting opportunities.

“Integrity, collaboration and respect are at the heart of Coastal GasLink’s commitment to creating lasting opportunities for Indigenous communities in northern British Columbia and we’re proud of the relationships we’ve built,” said Tiffany Murray, Coastal GasLink’s director of Indigenous Relations.

“There is unprecedented support for this pipeline project from Indigenous and local communities, including agreements with the 20 elected First Nations along the right of way. Our engagement started at the early conceptual phase and continues today,” added Murray. “We are committed to engaging and working collaboratively on the project as it moves through construction and into operations.”

Coastal GasLink is a 670-kilometre pipeline that will safely deliver natural gas from northeastern B.C. to the LNG Canada liquefaction facility in Kitimat, B.C., connecting clean, sustainability produced Canadian energy to the world and ultimately, playing a critical role in the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution in Asia.

Construction launched in early 2019 following more than six years of rigorous review and environmental assessment. From the beginning, the project team focused on building relationships based on mutual trust and respect by providing meaningful opportunities for participation in project planning and jobs and local contracting prospects for Indigenous and local businesses and their communities.

Photo provided courtesy of TC Energy. Coastal GasLink implemented a Construction Monitoring and Community Liaison Program (CMCL). It provides opportunities for Indigenous members to participate in construction within their traditional territory for the purposes of observing, recording and reporting on implementation of construction activities to their communities.

A milestone moment was marked in June 2018 when leadership from a number of Indigenous groups and Coastal GasLink celebrated the announcement of the commitment for $620 million in contract awards to northern British Columbia Indigenous businesses for the project’s right- of-way clearing, medical, security and workforce accommodations. To date, Coastal GasLink has exceeded its commitments  and  awarded  approximately $720 million in contracts to Indigenous and local businesses.

More than one-third of the field work completed on the project was conducted by Indigenous people and traditional knowledge was considered in its planning and design. The project continues to prioritize Indigenous and local hiring and held 25 Economic Summits along the route in 2018 and 2019 to connect interested job seekers and businesses with potential opportunities. Additionally, a variety of training programs continue to support Indigenous and local trainees and students. To protect Indigenous culture and values along with the environment during project construction, a Construction Monitoring and Community Liaison Program (CMCL) has been launched. The program provides opportunities for Indigenous community members to participate in construction within their traditional territory for the purposes of observing, recording and reporting on implementation of construction activities to their communities. It will continue through construction of the pipeline, which is planned for in-service in 2023.

Photo provided courtesy of TC Energy. Skills training and education is an essential part of Coastal GasLink’s committee to creating an extraordinary legacy. TC Energy invests in skills development and long-term education programs to support Indigenous and local residents and trainees.

Transparency is core to the CMCL program with Indigenous communities by meaningfully participating in the project to monitor the work that is being done. That open, relationship-based approach is something that Coastal GasLink believes is integral to the success of the projec

Harry Bodewitz, a program coordinator who is working closely with CMCL advisors from several Indigenous communities along the project corridor, has seen the value of the program. As construction ramps up, additional CMCL advisors will be brought on to be involved in the program.

“Something might have been planned initially, but once we actually get to the field, that plan may change, or get modified, to make sure it’s done right,” said Bodewitz. “In the CMCL Program, we have an opportunity to observe what’s going on, discuss it and share that with our communities.”

For Mike Gouchie, a CMCL coordinator from Lheidli T’enneh First Nation, the program provides a chance to be out in the field to make sure what matters to his community and neighbouring community CMCL advisors, is at the forefront of the construction program.

“As a CMCL coordinator, I’m able to assist the CMCL advisors to be out in the field with inspectors, construction management and myself to visit sites of interest, to understand the scope of the project in our territories and make sure environmental issues are identified,” he said.

Whether it’s in the field or at the table with First Nation leaders for monthly meetings, Coastal GasLink has involved Indigenous communities every step of the way.

Photo provided courtesy of TC Energy. Coastal GasLink is delivering significant economic benefits to British Columbian families today and for decades to come.

“I’m proud of the relationships we have built and the work we’ve done on this project,” said Murray.

“We believe that by building meaningful, long-term relationships based on trust and integrating feedback into our project, we will create an extraordinary legacy of safety and respect for communities and the environment.”

Background: The Canadian Energy Compendium is an annual Energy Council of Canada initiative which provides opportunity for cross-sectoral collaboration on a topic of shared interest across the Canadian energy sector, produced with the support of Canada’s national energy associations and Energy Council of Canada’s members. The stories contributed to the 2019 edition, Indigenous Energy Across Canada, highlight current conversations celebrating Canada’s dynamic energy sector and encouraging its continuous improvement.

Thanks to Todayville for helping us bring our members’ stories of collaboration and innovation to the public.

Click to read a Foreward from JP Gladu, Chief Development and Relations Officer, Steel River Group; Former President & CEO, Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

JP Gladu, Chief Development and Relations Officer, Steel
River Group; Former President & CEO, Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

Jacob Irving, President of Energy Council of Canada

The Canadian Energy Compendium is an annual initiative by the Energy Council of Canada to provide an opportunity for cross-sectoral collaboration and discussion on current topics in Canada’s energy sector.  The 2020 Canadian Energy Compendium: Innovations in Energy Efficiency is due to be released November 2020.

Click to read comments about this series from Jacob Irving, President of the Energy Council of Canada.

Read more on Todayville.

 

 

 

 

 

The Energy Council of Canada brings together a diverse body of members, including voices from all energy industries, associations, and levels of government within Canada. We foster dialogue, strategic thinking, collaboration, and action by bringing together senior energy executives from all industries in the public and private sectors to address national, continental, and international energy issues.

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Alberta

Hospital and health-care staff in Alberta to return to work today

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EDMONTON — Hospital and health-care staff are to return to work today after the Alberta Labour Relations Board ruled they acted illegally when walking off the job to protest recent cuts.

In a decision issued late Monday, the board ruled the workers’ refusal to work amounted to an illegal strike under the province’s Labour Relations Code, and they must return to work according to their scheduled shifts.

The Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, which represents the workers, said it would notify its members of their obligation to obey the labour board’s directive.

The AUPE represents about 58,000 health-care workers, although it wasn’t clear how many walked off the job.

There were reports of picketing outside the Royal Alexandra Hospital and University of Alberta in Edmonton, Foothills Hospital and the South Health Campus in Calgary, as well as at many other facilities across the province.

Earlier this month, Health Minister Tyler Shandro announced the United Conservative government would be cutting up to 11,000 health jobs to save money during the pandemic, but he said nurses and front-line clinical staff would not be affected.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 27, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Canadians don’t want to ‘rock the boat’ when voting during pandemic: experts

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EDMONTON — Monday’s re-election of another incumbent premier in Canada’s third recent provincial election shows Canadians don’t want to “rock the boat” during a global pandemic, say political experts.

Saskatchewan, British Columbia and New Brunswick have all had elections in the last two months that were defined by COVID-19. All the incumbent parties were re-elected. And British Columbia and New Brunswick went from minority governments to majorities.

Although each election had its own provincial issues, three professors pointed out that the votes were in provinces that have had some success keeping the novel coronavirus under control. Voters may have been happy with how the leaders handled the health crisis and wanted to continue in the same direction.

“It’s so difficult to predict what voters had in mind but, if there is a collective will, certainly it does seem to point to … stability is what they wanted,” said Donald Wright, professor and chair of political science at the University of New Brunswick.

“Canadians can look at the disaster unfolding in the United States and be thankful they have good governments both in Ottawa and the provincial capitals. Canada may be very appreciative of the governments we had with the pandemic.”

New Brunswick’s Progressive Conservatives were re-elected in September with a majority for Premier Blaine Higgs. His snap election call made the province the first to hold a vote since the pandemic began.

A similar dynamic played out in British Columbia where Premier John Horgan’s NDP gained enough seats on Saturday to form a majority government.

“I can say that certainly in B.C., a big part of the dynamic was that people felt this jurisdiction (did) relatively well (with COVID) and consequently worried that any changing government might destabilize that,” said Max Cameron, a professor in the University of British Columbia’s political science department.

“I think it did produce that desire to not to rock the boat at this particular moment, so in a kind of ironic way, you could say that the experience of governing a minority actually catapulted the government into a majority.”

A similar sentiment must have been felt among Saskatchewan’s electorate Monday, said Gerald Baier, an associate political science professor at the University of British Columbia. Saskatchewan Party Leader Scott Moe won a majority government, the party’s fourth in a row.

Moe and his opponent, NDP Leader Ryan Meili, had contrasting plans for how to steer the province through the pandemic.

Meili promised millions of dollars in increased spending for classrooms and to hire more front-line health workers. Moe promised to balance the books by the 2024-2025 fiscal year, while keeping the economy going and creating jobs through tax and rebate incentives.

“(If) people are happy with the job the government’s been doing during the pandemic, they’re much more likely to say, ‘Now is not the time for a change’,” said Baier.

“They’re much more likely to say, ‘Right now is not the time for a new set of hands on the wheel’ and I think that’s something that explains part of the dynamic in Saskatchewan.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 27, 2020.

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This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Fakiha Baig, The Canadian Press

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