Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

“A Really Special Place” – Why the Wild Rose Motocross Track is One of a Kind

Published

4 minute read

This summer, as you wander between the breweries and activity centers located in southeast Calgary, pause for a moment – if you listen closely, you may hear the distant rumble of motocross engines as bikes of all sizes careen over jumps and around corners at the Wild Rose Motocross Track.

Located just off Blackfoot Trail in Southeast Calgary, the 88-acre park is backed by the Calgary skyline, a prime piece of land located just minutes from downtown. Founded in the 1960’s as the Blackfoot Motorcycle Park, the track has deep roots in the city of Calgary, and according to WRMA board member David Pinkman, “Few sagas can compete with the wild west history of Calgary’s Wild Rose Motocross Association and its hard-core motocross lovers.” 


Photo Credit Eden Schell 

In 1984, The Wild Rose Motocross Association (WRMA) was officially formed, and the Blackfoot Motorcycle Park became the Wild Rose. Acting as a major host for a number of national motocross events since the 70’s and nurturing some of Canada’s best professional riders to date, Pinkman argues the “course of Canadian motocross history may not have been the same but for this unique piece of dirt and hills.”

With 7 tracks available including the full-sized Main, East and Hill Tracks, as well as the Extreme Beginner, Mini, Pee Wee, and Enduro Tracks, Wild Rose welcomes riders of all ages and skill levels. “This is the only track of its kind in Canada,” says Michelle McCarthy, newest member of the WRMA board, “It’s right in the centre of the city; it’s got 3 big bike tracks, the smaller tracks and the enduro park. This is a really special place.”
Whether it be your first time on a bike or the day you’re finally going to clear that 15-foot tabletop, the track encourages everyone to come out and ride. “People want to see new riders,” says McCarthy, “they want to see the community flourish. Plus, dirt biking is really, really fun,” she laughs.  


Photo Credit Eden Schell 

Like countless other Canadian businesses, the Wild Rose Track has taken a hit due to COVID-19, with day pass riders and memberships being significantly down. Open year round – weather permitting – the track normally sees up to 30,000 visits per year. However, due to the pandemic, numbers are currently far lower as the park operates within capacity limits. 

As a recreational park on city property, track management wanted to set an example for taking action to reduce the spread of COVID-19, responding rapidly to Alberta Government guidelines by implementing a number of new precautions and preventative measures. This includes constructing wash stations at every track, implementing paperless transactions and COVID-19 symptom screening upon entry to the park, as well as establishing an online scheduling system to limit the number of riders at the track at one time.  

In the midst of the new normal, the park remains committed to growing and supporting the motocross community in Calgary and beyond, staying on top of updates that will allow them to return to racing and regular operation as soon as possible. While all spring and summer race series have been cancelled by COVID-19, the WRMA is actively monitoring pandemic updates with the goal of hosting a successful race series this coming fall. 

To learn more about the Wild Rose Motocross Association, visit https://www.wildrosemx.com.

 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Calgary murder trial hearing from undercover officers in death of toddler in 2019

Published on

CALGARY — The trial of a Calgary man who has admitted to killing his girlfriend but not her young daughter is hearing today about an undercover police operation that helped find their bodies.

Robert Leeming has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the death of Jasmine Lovett and not guilty to second-degree murder in the death of 22-month-old Aliyah Sanderson. 

The mother and toddler were reported missing in April 2019 after they didn’t show up for a family dinner.

A few weeks later, two undercover officers approached Leeming on a street.

The trial has heard that, a few hours later, Leeming confided to the officers the location of the bodies.

They were found buried in a shallow grave in a day-use area in Kananaskis Country, west of Calgary.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 21, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Alberta First Nation finishes first phase of search at former residential school site

Published on

KAPAWE’NO FIRST NATION — A northern Alberta First Nation says it has completed the first phase of ground penetrating radar in its search for children’s remains at a former residential school site.

Kapawe’no First Nation, which is located northwest of Edmonton, says in a written statement that finding any unmarked graves at Grouard Indian Residential School, also known as St. Bernard Mission School, is imperative to the community’s collective healing.

The school was opened by the Roman Catholic Church in 1894 and closed about 60 years ago.

Kapawe’no First Nation says the archeology department at the University of Alberta is leading the project and a report on its findings should be finished by the end of the year.

The First Nation says they are also working with Treaty 8 First Nation to search for unmarked graves at 10 other residential school sites in Treaty No. 8 Territory.

The statement says the work has not received funding from the federal or provincial government.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 21, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Trending

X