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Ag Business

Open Farm Days This Weekend all over Alberta!!

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alberta open farm days

From the Province of Alberta

New attractions brewing at Open Farm Days

Albertans are encouraged to mark Aug. 17-18 on their calendars to experience this year’s Alberta Open Farm Days lineup, including an exclusive craft beer.

This year Open Farm Days reached out to the breweries registered, and proposed they collaborate together to make a special OFD beer.  The breweries that have decided to participate include Troubled Monk Brewing, Apex Predator Brewing, Lakeland Brewing Company, Blindman Brewing, Township 24 Brewery, and Red Bison Brewery.

Alberta craft brewers

People can visit more than 150 host farms across the province for open houses, tours and an opportunity to buy locally grown and homemade products.

“Open Farm Days is a fantastic event that gives Albertans a chance to get to know neighbours and learn where our food comes from. It’s also a great way to buy local and support our rural economy and agriculture sector, with fun events for the whole family.”

Tanya Fir, Minister of Economic Development, Trade and Tourism

Culinary farm-to-fork events that highlight local ingredients have been popular at Open Farm Days. This year, six Alberta breweries have developed a craft beer featuring four Alberta-grown products. The Open Farm Days cream ale showcases Alberta-grown wheat, oats, corn and haskap berries. The ale is available now at participating breweries and select restaurants.

“Alberta has some of the world’s best farmers, food producers and processors. Now is a great time to step up and show support for Alberta’s agriculture industry. I encourage Albertans to buy local food, meet a farmer in their community and get to know the people who put food on their tables.”

Devin Dreeshen, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry

Overall, there are 29 culinary events and 11 tours to enjoy this year. Other fan-favourite activities such as corn mazes, hayrides and mini golf are also making their return.

Admission to farms is free, but there may be costs for some activities and many are cash only. It is also recommended to bring a cooler to store produce and other products. Tickets for culinary events are available for purchase. Space is limited, so people are encouraged to buy tickets ahead of time.

Alberta Open Farms Days is a collaborative project presented by the Government of Alberta, the Alberta Association of Agricultural Societies, Travel Alberta and participating farms and ranches. Visit albertafarmdays.ca for more information, including details about tickets and where to buy the Open Farm Days cream ale.

Quick facts

  • Open Farm Days has directly contributed to nearly $650,000 in on-farm sales since 2013.
  • There have been nearly 82,000 visits over the history of Alberta Open Farm Days, with increasing attendance each year.
  • Since Open Farm Days launched in 2013, 484 Alberta farms have participated in the popular event.
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Ag Business

Farmers Rock for AG at Farm Forum Event in Saskatoon

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Ag Rocks Text

Ag Rocks For Charity is a cool initiative.

Nick Saik puts his massive skills to good work in this video showcasing some harmonica riffls along with a fine pitch for donating to his charity of choice Agriculture In The Classroom. Nick is our partner in Todayville Agriculture and we are cheering him on in his quest to raise $5 grand. Or as he puts it, “…Teaching Kids by Beating My Dad…”.

It’s part of the AG Rocks For Charity initiative, a fun component of the Farm Forum Event, a 3 day conference in Saskatoon, SK (Dec. 3rd to 5th). The video tells you all about how passionate Nick is about laying a fiscal beating on his pa.

AG ROCKS FOR CHARITY is a highlight of the weekend.  Here’s how it works.  Some very talented volunteers compete to raise the most money and profile for their charity of choice. Click here for the entire talent line up, other important links, and more information.

We’re excited about all of the performances, but in particular, we’re pushing our own hometown hero Nick Saik.

CLICK HERE TO SUPPORT NICK AND DONATE RIGHT NOW TO AGRICULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM.

PHOTO OF NICK ON RAILROAD

Nick Saik, President of Know Ideas Media, filmmaker, media entrepreneur, musician, dad

As noted, Nick’s charity of choice is  Agriculture In The Classroom. In Nick’s words, “…helping kids get excited about food production is critical for the long term public trust of agriculture, and nobody is better at giving kids good information than Ag In The Classroom…”

We’ve heard Nick perform before, and recently caught him strumming his guitar and brushing up on some Garth and The Band.  From what we’re hearing, his interpretations of Friends in Low Places and The Weight are certainly worthy of the price of admission right there.

Nick’s also a talented filmmaker. If you want to see some of his handiwork, check out this story featuring a brilliant short video he produced called “Nut Milking Exposed”, now viewed well north of 50 million times.

The Farm Forum Event is a three-day conference that brings together progressive farmers, agricultural professionals and academics to learn about where game-changing innovation and the latest AG research connects with practical on-farm operations.

Here’s a short promotional video for Ag Rocks for Charity (also produced by Nick – like I said, he’s a talented guy.  Help him out please!

Please consider donating – Agriculture in the Classroom is a great initiative.  Or maybe you need a vacation.  Check out this cool travel story on Todayville Red Deer.

“India? Are you nuts?” Join Gerry for Part 1 of his series on India.

 

 

 

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Ag Business

Producers have more than weather on their minds, FCC survey shows

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From Farm Credit Canada

Producers have more than weather on their minds, FCC survey shows

 

Regina, Saskatchewan, November 12, 2019 – Canadian producers are thinking well beyond weather conditions, commodity prices and yields when it comes to weighing their risks, according to a recent Farm Credit Canada (FCC) survey.

While production-related risks – such as weather, pests and disease – are still very much top of mind in every sector of Canadian agriculture, producers are also keenly aware of risks related to marketing, financial and human resources (matters involving employees, partners and family).

“Modern farming involves so much more than making decisions around production,” said Craig Klemmer, FCC’s principal agricultural economist. “It means keeping tabs on markets; ensuring your business can withstand sudden changes in commodity prices or economic conditions; and managing human resources while maintaining a safe work environment.”

The survey, conducted from July 11-15, showed a majority of farm operators reported a high level of concern for marketing (67 per cent of respondents), production (60 per cent) and financial (53 per cent) risks. Human resources and legal risks were less of a concern at 31 per cent and 23 per cent, respectively.

Looking at risk through the lens of individual sectors, marketing risks were most prominent among beef and grains/oilseed sector producers at 74 per cent, followed by the fruit/vegetable/greenhouse sector at 58 per cent and the supply managed sectors of dairy and poultry at 55 per cent and 53 per cent, respectively. Price and market access were among the top concerns.

Financial risk ranked highest among dairy, hog, cattle and other livestock producers, in the mid-50-per-cent range, and was slightly lower for the grains/oilseed and fruit/vegetable/greenhouse sectors. Financial risk was significantly less of a concern for poultry producers at 36 per cent.

Ensuring there is sufficient working capital was the most prominent financial concern across all sectors, followed by unfavourable changes in interest rates and meeting debt payment obligations. Almost 65 per cent of the respondents identified insufficient working capital as a risk to their operation. Out of this group, about 45 per cent indicated relying on off-farm income to mitigate this financial risk.

Transitioning farm operations to the next generation was identified as a concern for 44 per cent of respondents, with about half of those respondents indicating they have a succession plan. Transition concerns were the most prominent among grains/oilseeds and dairy producers, while workplace safety was a common concern among all sectors.

The survey also explored a variety of production-related risks. Concerns about the weather were most prominent in grains/oilseeds and beef sectors, while concerns related to pests and disease were mostly on the minds of poultry producers.

“The good news is most producers are in a solid financial position to withstand short-term impacts on their business,” Klemmer said. “We encourage producers to have a risk management plan that pulls together mitigation strategies, as well as identifies key risks and available solutions to manage these risks before they emerge.”

The survey involved 1,363 producers considered key decision makers for their operations. Based on the sample size, the survey has a margin of error plus/minus 2.2 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

By sharing agriculture survey results, FCC provides solid insights and expertise to help those in the business of agriculture achieve their goals. For more information and insights on Canadian agriculture, visit the FCC Ag Economics blog post at fcc.ca/AgEconomics. To learn more about the FCC Vision Panel, visit www.fccvision.ca.

FCC is Canada’s leading agriculture lender, with a healthy loan portfolio of more than $36 billion. Our employees are dedicated to the future of Canadian agriculture and its role in feeding an ever-growing world. We provide flexible, competitively priced financing, management software, information and knowledge specifically designed for the agriculture and agri-food industry. As a self-sustaining Crown corporation, our profits are reinvested back into the agriculture and food industry we serve and the communities where our customers and employees live and work while providing an appropriate return to our shareholder. Visit fcc.ca or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and on Twitter @FCCagriculture.

 

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