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COVID-19

Florida surgeon general asks FDA for answers after study allegedly finds DNA fragments in COVID shots

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Florida’s Surgeon General Dr. Joseph Ladapo speaks during a press conference

From LifeSiteNews

By Ashley Sadler

‘The American people and the scientific community have a right to have all relevant information pertaining to the COVID-19 vaccines to properly inform individual decision making’

Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo on Wednesday pushed the head of the FDA for answers regarding a preprint study that alleged the contamination of mRNA COVID-19 shots with plasmid DNA.

“The American people and the scientific community have a right to have all relevant information pertaining to the COVID-19 vaccines to properly inform individual decision making,” Dr. Ladapo wrote in the December 6 letter addressed to FDA Commissioner Robert M. Califf, MD, MACC.

Ladapo, who has frequently resisted the prevailing narrative on COVID-19 vaccination — even warning young men not to get the shots at all — previously wrote to the CDC in May to share concerns about the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 jabs, particularly in the context of their accelerated approval. He said he has not received a response to his inquiry.

In his December 6 letter to the FDA, the Sunshine State’s surgeon general wrote to share his concern about “the recent discovery of host cell DNA fragments within the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. This raises concerns regarding the presence of nucleic acid contaminants in the approved Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 mRNA vaccines.”

As LifeSiteNews reported in October, a new preprint study claimed to have discovered “significant levels” of “plasmid DNA” in expired COVID-19 vaccines, impurities the researchers say may be linked to adverse events. The study, which is not yet peer-reviewed, calls for “further investigation” to corroborate the findings.

Authors David J. Speicher, Jessica Rose, L. Maria Gutschi, David M. Wiseman, Ph.D., and Kevin McKernan said in the 31-page study they had found “billions to hundreds of billions of DNA molecules per dose” that they gathered from “[e]xpired unopened vials of Pfizer-BioNTech [shots] … and Moderna Spikevax mRNA” jabs “obtained from various pharmacies in Ontario, Canada.”

READ: Researchers report finding ‘significant levels of plasmid DNA’ in COVID shots, call for ‘further investigation’

According to the researchers, the “preliminary evidence … warrant[s] confirmation and further investigation.”

An earlier preprint in June published by McKernan and his fellow researchers alleged that a fragment of a “monkey virus” genome, SV40, had been discovered in the COVID-19 jabs. The study noted that SV40 had previously been discovered in polio vaccines in the 1950s and 1960s and was linked to cancer. However, Health Feedback has noted that the DNA found in the COVID jabs was only a “fragment” of that genome, and that it’s unclear whether SV40 causes cancer in humans (current research only supports risk of cancer in certain animals), LifeSiteNews previously reported. 

In Ladapo’s letter to the FDA, he cited 2007 guidance from the FDA itself that, he stated, raised the possibility that “DNA integration could theoretically impact a human’s oncogenes – the genes which can transform a healthy cell into a cancerous cell,” and could therefore “result in chromosomal instability.”

“The Guidance for Industry discusses biodistribution of DNA vaccines and how such integration could affect unintended parts of the body including blood, heart, brain, liver, kidney, bone marrow, ovaries/testes, lung, draining lymph nodes, spleen, the site of administration and subcutis at injection site,” he summarized.

RELATED: Florida surgeon general Joseph Ladapo warns against taking new COVID-19 shots

After laying out the guidance from the FDA on the potential risks of DNA contamination, Ladapo asked the agency to answer whether manufacturers of the drugs have “evaluated the risk of human genome integration or mutagenesis of residual DNA contaminants from the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines alongside the additional risk of DNA integration from the lipid nanoparticle delivery system and SV40 promoter/enhancer?”

“Has [the] FDA inquired any information from the drug manufacturers to investigate such risk?” he asked.

Ladapo also asked whether “FDA standards for acceptable and safe quantity of residual DNA (present as known contaminants in biological therapies) consider the lipid nanoparticle delivery system for the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines?” Pfizer and Moderna’s COVID-19 jabs contain lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), which are “tiny balls of fat” that act as delivery mechanisms for the mRNA vaccine.

Florida’s surgeon general further inquired whether, given “the potentially wide biodistribution of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines and DNA contaminants beyond the local injection site,” the FDA has “evaluated the risk of DNA integration in reproductive cells with respect to the lipid nanoparticle delivery system?”

Citing “the urgency of these questions due to the mass administration of these vaccines and currently unavailable data surrounding possible genomic effects,” Ladapo closed his letter by asking the FDA to respond to his questions in one week’s time (December 13) by sending a written response to both his “previous letter and the concerns I have outlined above.”

Dr. Ladapo, who earned his MD from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. from Harvard University, was appointed to lead Florida’s health department by Florida Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis in 2021. He quickly made a name for himself as something of a maverick among state health department officials for his resistance to the prevailing COVID-19 narrative, and he has consistently and publicly spoken out against COVID-19 jabs, lockdowns, and mask mandates.

COVID-19

Freedom Convoy organizer sues Trudeau gov’t for freezing his bank account

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From LifeSiteNews

By Anthony Murdoch

the day the EA was invoked, Canadian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland mandated certain bank accounts be frozen under the EA. In total, close to $8 million in funds from 267 people were locked. Additionally, 170 Bitcoin wallets were frozen.

Chris Barber, one of the leaders of the 2022 Freedom Convoy protests against COVID mandates, is suing the federal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for freezing his bank account and hundreds of others involved with the demonstrations after a recent court ruling declared the Emergencies Act (EA) was unconstitutional and unreasonable.

Barber’s lawsuit comes shortly after a Canadian federal court last month ruled that the Trudeau government’s use of the EA to quash the Freedom Convoy in 2022 was unconstitutional. The court ruled that the use of the EA was a direct violation of the Charter and thus “not justified.”

A trucker from Saskatchewan, Barber was heavily involved in the Freedom Convoy, which saw thousands make their way to Ottawa in protest of COVID vaccine mandates and lockdowns. His lawsuit claims that his Charter rights were violated through the dictates of the federal government.

The lawsuit was filed two weeks ago in the Court of King’s Bench in Saskatoon. Among its claims is a section alleging that the federal government abused its power to go after the truckers.

The EA controversially allowed the government to freeze the bank accounts of protesters, conscript tow truck drivers, and arrest people for participating in assemblies the government deemed illegal.

On February 14, 2022, the day the EA was invoked, Canadian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland mandated certain bank accounts be frozen under the EA. In total, close to $8 million in funds from 267 people were locked. Additionally, 170 Bitcoin wallets were frozen.

The freezing of bank accounts by Freeland without a court order was an unprecedented action in Canadian history and was only allowed through the Liberal government’s invocation of the never-before-used EA.

As a result of Freeland’s order, Barber’s bank account was frozen. He owns a trucking company, and according to the lawsuit, the frozen bank account resulted in missed payments as well as defaulting on loans, which negatively impacted his credit rating.

“This disruption deprived (Barber and his wife) of the ability to conduct basic financial transactions and live normal lives, leading to severe inconvenience, hardship, embarrassment, exclusion from modern society, and damaged personal and business relationships,” a portion of the lawsuit reads.

 As for the freezing of bank accounts, Barber’s lawsuit alleges that the Trudeau government’s decision to do this was for the “improper purpose of dissuading and punishing” Freedom Convoy protesters who were exercising their Charter rights.

The lawsuit also lists Barber’s wife along with his trucking business as lead plaintiffs.

At this point, no statement of defense has been filed by the Trudeau government, Global News reported.

According to the lawsuit statement, Barber’s bank personal and business bank accounts were frozen only a day after the Trudeau government enacted the EA. He was not able to withdraw or deposit money or use his credit cards, and even his automatic bill payments were stopped.

According to the lawsuit, Barber “suffered and experienced fear and anxiety due to the anticipated loss of income.”

Barber and Freedom Convoy leader Tamara Lich have been involved in a lengthy trial after being charged and taken to court by the government. The trial has been put on hold, with its resumption date uncertain. It is also not yet clear how the recent court ruling will affect the trial.

LifeSiteNews reported just over a week ago that Lich, Barber and a host of others filed a $2 million lawsuit against the government.

Freedom Convoy lawyer Keith Wilson said Section 24 of Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms “gives Canadians the right to sue their government for damages when Charter rights are violated.”

“Doing so affirms the seriousness of respecting Charter rights and is intended to deter future governments from breaching Canadians’ fundamental rights,” he said.

An investigation into the use of the EA, as per Canadian law, was launched by Trudeau. However, it was headed by Liberal-friendly Judge Paul Rouleau, who led the Public Order Emergency Commission. Unsurprisingly, the commission exonerated Trudeau.

Federal and provincial politicians have come out in support of the truckers. Last week, LifeSiteNews reported that newly elected Conservative Legislative Assembly of Alberta (MLA) member Eric Bouchard praised the Freedom Convoy protesters for doing what “was right” in opposing to COVID mandates.

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COVID-19

Trudeau gov’t appeals federal court ruling that Emergencies Act use was ‘not justified’

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From LifeSiteNews

By Clare Marie Merkowsky

Trudeau’s appeal will be heard in the Federal Court of Appeal where he personally appointed 10 out of the 15 judges.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government has appealed the ruling which found that its use of the Emergencies Act in 2022 to crush the Freedom Convoy was “not justified.”

On February 22, the Trudeau government filed an appeal against Federal Court Justice Richard Mosley’s decision that the enactment of the EA to end the 2022 Freedom Convoy protesting COVID mandates violated the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.   

“The Federal Court erred in fact and law in declaring that the Regulations infringed subsection 2(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” a copy of the appeal obtained by CBC News alleges.  

The appeal requested that the January decision be overturned, claiming that measures did not violate Charter rights and was justified considering the circumstances.  

The document further claimed that Federal Court’s decision was not accurate because it had the “benefit of hindsight” which the Trudeau government did not have in 2022.  

It argued that the court should have examined if the Trudeau government “had reasonable grounds to believe” that the EA was justified.  

Notably, in the Federal Court of Appeal, where the case will be heard, 10 out of the 15 judges were appointed by Trudeau.    

In addition to 10 of the court justices, Chief Justice Yves de Montigny likewise owes his position to Trudeau. While he was appointed to the court by former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, he was promoted to the role of Chief Justice by Trudeau in November 2023.    

The appeal comes after the landmark decision that Trudeau was “not justified” in invoking the EA to shut down the 2022 Freedom Convoy which protested COVID regulations and vaccine mandates.     

Furthermore, the ruling pointed out that there were other means to end the protest, such as provisions in the Criminal Code, which the province of Alberta had argued at the time.    

The decision stated that, in addition to being an unnecessary measure, the EA had violated Canadians’ Charter rights, specifically infringing on freedom of thought, opinion, and expression.    

On February 14, 2022, the EA was enacted to shut down the Freedom Convoy protest which took place in Ottawa. The popular protest featured thousands of Canadians calling for an end to COVID mandates by camping outside Parliament in Ottawa.     

Measures taken under the EA included freezing the bank accounts of Canadians who donated to the protest.    

Trudeau revoked the EA on February 23 after the protesters had been cleared out. At the time, seven of Canada’s 10 provinces opposed Trudeau’s use of the EA. 

Trudeau had disparaged unvaccinated Canadians, saying those opposing his measures were of a “small, fringe minority” who hold “unacceptable views” and do not “represent the views of Canadians who have been there for each other.”     

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