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Fire rescue at Blue Plate

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Edmonton downtown winter

We love stories from our community.  Register here and publish your own stories.  Thanks to local writer and communicator and former journalist Glenn Kubish for this delightful snapshot of a recent act of kindness that melted everyone around!

Fire rescue at Blue Plate

Sick with a cold, tired from the non-stop and just a bit weary from the sick and tired, I drove home down 104 Ave this afternoon in a rush hour that felt like a funeral procession.

And hungry. Right, no lunch. Add hunger to the list. No doubt, I was suffering. I’m not aware of anyone who suffers quite like I do. Shelagh, sitting next to me in the car, would likely agree.

And not on my bike. Let me keep counting the woes.

We turned off at 122 Street, parked the car and headed for Blue Plate. I ordered an Old Fashioned. A stabilizer, as my friend Al would say. I sipped it. Contemplated the maraschino cherry pinned between the glass and the ice cube die. Remembered how my parents said mar-a-SHEE-no, but Bogart said mar-a-SKEE-no. We talked about music. Shelagh remembered parties where she first heard Dire Straits and Talking Heads. We’ve been telling each other stories for 35 years. I hadn’t heard that one before. That was nice.

I looked out the window at a fire truck, its lights flashing, parked in front of the restaurant. The vehicle also captured the attention of a young boy walking into the restaurant with his parents. The little guy slowed his pace to keep looking at the light show. Who could blame him? The three eventually sat at a booth next to ours. A few minutes later, a firefighter came in and quietly asked the parents if their son would like a firefighter colouring book. The boy was so happy.

The restaurant melted.

“That is so nice,” a woman said from a table behind us.

Later, the boy’s father walked up to our table and said he had noticed I had captured the moment and would I be kind enough to share the pics?  He was overwhelmed by the firefighter’s kindness. There were tears in his eyes. I texted him the pics. We talked a bit. His family is francophone de l’Alberta. We spoke a bit of French.

There is so much that I am not certain about anymore. So much that’s murky. But I know for sure that that father loved his son.

I felt in the world again. Maybe we don’t need to find rest as much as we need to see kindness.

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Alberta

Albertans encouraged to wear cloth masks in public: easy tips and links on “How To” make your own

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It is not the law, but Canada and Alberta have agreed with the idea that wearing a homemade cloth mask might help in the spreading the coronavirus, especially when it is hard to maintain the 2-metre physical distancing when in public.

YouTuber Japanese Creations offers how-to make face masks videos and tip for fogged-up glasses. Link Below

It is a culture clash between eastern and western countries. Unlike most Asian countries where a lot of the population regularly wear masks in public, in Western counties wearing a mask in public is not as easily accepted by the majority of the population. Many people find that they are treated as “infected” when they wear a face mask in public. Only time will tell if this Covid- 19 pandemic will change the majority of Canadians opinion people wear masks in public.

In February, China’s state media site posted a very strong opinion piece entitled, “Refusing Mask Wearing In Public Is A Threat To Civilization.”

Also not pulling any punches, virologist and immunologist, George Gao told ScienceMagazine.org, “The big mistake in the U.S. and Europe – is that people aren’t wearing masks. Gao is the director-general of the  Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, “This virus is transmitted by droplets and close contact.

George Gao

You’ve got to wear a mask, because when you speak, there are always droplets coming out of your mouth – masks, can prevent droplets that carry the virus from escaping and infecting others.” Across Asian countries the populations are onboard that, “there are an unknown number of people that are asystematic, carrying the coronavirus and they do not even know it.” So, in the spirit of a country’s solidarity, “there is a need to protect others from yourself.”

In recent weeks countries have seen the stats and cannot ignore the lower numbers of infected in mask wearing countries like, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Singapore, the region of Hong Kong and China has also now flatted the curve and have loosed up on the city military lock-downs.

Recently passing laws that make it mandatory to wear a face mask in public are the Czech, Slovakia, Indonesia and the Philippines. On April 3rd, US President Donald Trump, announced that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending, on a voluntary basis, that Americans wear “non-medical cloth” face coverings.

Making homemade masks can be a fun family craft time. If you are of age, you can even toast a glass of wine to celebrate a good job. Make extras so you can change them up, give to friends or even donate them to those in need.

In Canada Chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam has changed her view and is now saying, “Wearing a non-medical mask, even if you have no symptoms, is an additional measure that you can take to protect others around you in situations where physical distancing is difficult to maintain, such as in public transit or maybe in the grocery store.”

In Alberta, the view has also changed on the general public wearing mask in public. Leading off with the premier Kenney, who has seen countries that have been successful in keeping the transmission of COVID-19 down, have all had widespread use of face masks. Alberta’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw said at a press conference, “What we know is that people who are sick spread illness – wearing a non-medical mask, such as a homemade cloth mask, has not been proven to protect the person who is wearing it,” but added, “However, it may be helpful in protecting others around you.”

The Alberta government wants people to follow these rules, even when wearing face coverings in public.

  • Continue to follow all other public health guidance (staying two metres away from others, wash hands regularly, stay home when sick).
  • Avoid touching your face and mask while using it.
  • Wash hands before putting on a mask, then before and after removing it.
  • Clean a cloth mask as soon as it gets damp or soiled.
  • Put it directly in the washing machine or a sealed bag that can be emptied into the washing machine and then be disposed of.
  • Cloth masks can be laundered with other items using a hot cycle, then dried in the dryer at the highest temperature setting.
  • Medical masks can’t be washed and should be discarded and replaced as soon as they get damp, soiled or crumpled.
  • Dispose of these masks in a lined garbage bin.
  • Do not share masks with others.

There are many online resources where you can easily make a cloth mask with or without a sewing machine.

  1. Youtuber Danysska from the Czech republic has a very easy “How To” do instructions on how to make a cloth mask with no sewing.
  2. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has a web page with easy instructions on how to make 3-different masks, one needs a sewing machine and two do not.
  3. With 1.5+ million views already. Japanese Creations on YouTube has two great how to videos. The second one has good tips to help glasses from fogging up, amazing what a small piece of tinfoil can do. Both do not need for a sewing machine. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyxl_I7lKw-bjUz3ECa_jwg
  4. The Surgeon General for the US, Dr. Jerome Adam has an easy to follow how to make a face mask video, with-out a sewing machine.
  5. From prixprix on Instructables.com with a step by step photo instructions on how to make face mask out of an old T-shirt, no sewing machine required.
  6. With over 1.9+ million views, HomeMadeOnOurHomestead, has a good how to sew a reusable face mask with a filter pocket.
  7.  1.6+ million views and counting, Thoughtful Creativity, has a tutorial on how to make cloth face masks in a batches using a sewing machine.
  8. Not wanting to be outdone with 1.8+ million views, Kim’s Kitchen Affair, and her DIY how to sew a reusable pleated face mask with nose bridge and filter pockets in just 5 Minutes. Some sewing skills required!

Click here to read more on Todayville Edmonton.

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Community

#WithGlowingHearts thanks employers who support Reservists

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#WithGlowingHearts thanks employers who support Reservists

As Canada works to overcome the pandemic challenges, #Reservists are being mobilized to assist. With many thanks to ‪#Employers who support them to do important work on behalf of us all. Employers also have access to tools for support such as “With Glowing Hearts” Reservist Support Program & CERP (Compensation for Employers of Reservist Program). When Employers support Reservists, they too serve our country. Thank you! @CFLCCA ‪#CAF.

Reservists play an integral role in the companies and organizations they work for outside of their military careers.  Here are three interviews that were conducted in Edmonton in 2019. They showcase the way employers and reservists support each other.  If you’re an employer who is considering hiring a Reservist, these videos will provide some real world insights from both employers and reservists.

Here is an interview with Sean Pascek, Vice President with Prostar Energy/Well Service about the benefits his company has gained from employing reservist Master Corporal Wolfgang Brettner as their company’s Safety Manager. Interview was conducted in summer of 2019

Meet Kevin MacLeod, interviewed here in his role as Managing Senior Principal of Stantec Geomatix and Captain Vikesh Malhi, a reservist and Project Manager with Stantec.  Interview was conducted in summer of 2019.

Cory Stockley, Dispatch Manager with Tag Logistics and Master Warrant Officer Andrew Gordey discuss their relationship and the mutual benefits of having a reservist on staff. 

Click for more information on #WithGlowingHearts

About the Canadian Forces Liaison Council:  The Canadian Forces Liaison Council (CFLC) is a national organization comprised of over 200 senior executives and community leaders within the private and public sectors who volunteer their time to encourage employer/educator support for the Reserve Force.

We work in partnership with the Department of National Defence to engage employers, educational institutions and other organizations to emphasise how valuable reserve service is to Canadian communities and the defence of Canada. The CFLC’s objective is to raise awareness among organizations and show how they can benefit by employing reservists and take advantage of the special leadership and skills training reservists receive.

We aim to educate employers of the special skills that reservists have to enable them to fulfill their military obligations and attend training courses. To do this, the Council has worked with the Defence Team to develop and deliver a wide range of effective employer support programs such as ExecuTreks. Connecting to the business community, these programs inform, engage, educate, recognize and support employers and their reservist employees.

CFLC also delivers provincial and national awards programs to recognize employers and educational institutions who demonstrate, above and beyond, support of Reservists and the Canadian Reserve Force. The Reserves form a critical component of Canada’s Defence Strategy – Strong, Secure, Engaged – and are prepared to answer the demand as our military is increasingly called to action.

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