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Health

Central Alberta family desperate for a miracle… Looking for a hero

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This post has been submitted by the mother of a young Central Alberta father.  He moved to Calgary years ago to be closer to medical care.   His wife grew up in Sylvan Lake and Lacombe.  Together they’re raising 2 children and unfortunately their future is uncertain.  

From Julie. 

You may or may not have seen a desperate plea from a Central Alberta family trying to save a loved one’s life.  This is the kind of situation that requires a really large number of people to help out.  You never know who’s going to step forward and become someone’s hero.  The key is, they have to know about the situation before they can act on it.  So.. here’s a bit of information about this

Alex’s Journey

Having a baby is supposed to be a wonderful time in your life. Alex was born looking healthy; however, it all went wrong for him at 22 months of age.

After being rushed by his Father and I by car to our nearby city hospital, Alex was hospitalized for 5 days with a 105 degree fever, which nothing would bring down. Alex was in so much pain, screaming a blood curdling sound that made you think someone was murdering this poor baby slowly.

Once at hospital he was whisked away to try to identify the problem. They told us he was a mess inside and needed to be airlifted to Sick Children’s Hospital. Once there it became a series of surgeries and a lengthy hospital stay. His kidneys were being affected by a blockage he had developed.

By age four he lost one kidney and again needed several hospital visits and surgeries to help save his other kidney. The doctors explained that Alex has Chronic Renal Failure and would eventually need a kidney transplant. At age 8 we almost lost him again due to a potassium overload in his remaining kidney that gradually slowed his heart dangerously. We made another trip to Sick Children’s Hospital to get his levels back down before his heart stopped.

Through all these hardships Alex always remained a tough little guy. Now as a 29-year-old with a loving wife and 2 little ones, the time has come for our son and he is in need of a kidney.

My name is Julie, I am his mother and I have said from the beginning of this journey that I will give my kidney. That being said, it would be wise to have more donors that are willing as well to help him have a greater chance of success. His older brother has also volunteered, so please help us give Alex and his family a happy, healthy life.

Julie (mom)

If you have Blood Type O and this something you could do, our family would be so grateful to have the chance to keep him in our lives and give him the opportunity to watch his children grow up. Anyone can be tested to see if they are a match. You will need Alex’s full name so please visit the Facebook Group we have set up and reach out to our admin/s. https://www.facebook.com/groups/708888052863495/

To Get Tested: 403 944 4635

Alberta

Alberta seeing spike in syphilis cases

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Syphilis rates way up in Alberta

Rates of syphilis in Alberta on the rise

Infectious and congenital syphilis rates have escalated across the province over the past five years, with a sharp increase in 2018.

The rapid increase in syphilis cases has spurred Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, to declare a provincial outbreak and encourage Albertans to get tested and protect themselves.

“We need to emphasize for all Albertans: Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are a risk to anyone who is sexually active, particularly people who have new sex partners and are not using protection. I encourage anyone who is sexually active to get tested regularly. Anyone in Alberta can access STI testing and treatment for free.”

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Chief Medical Officer of Health

In response to the sharp rise in 2018, a provincial outbreak coordination committee composed of Alberta Health, Alberta Health Services (AHS) and other provincial health officials has been activated. Over the next three months, the committee will develop a coordinated strategy and determine concrete actions to increase STI testing, promote public awareness and reduce the overall number of syphilis cases in Alberta.

“Sexual health is an important part of overall health. We are working with community partners to remove stigma and increase awareness about STI testing services throughout Alberta. If you are sexually active, make regular STI testing part of your health routine.”

Dr. Laura McDougall, Senior Medical Officer of Health, AHS

 

A total of 1,536 cases of infectious syphilis were reported in 2018 compared to 161 in 2014, almost a tenfold increase. The rate of infectious syphilis has not been this high in Alberta since 1948.

Congenital syphilis, which occurs when a child is born to a mother with syphilis, is a severe, disabling and life-threatening disease. While congenital syphilis cases were rare before the outbreak, there were 22 congenital syphilis cases between 2014 and 2018, one of which was stillborn.

Consistent and correct condom use is important protection against STIs such as syphilis. Like other STIs, the symptoms of syphilis may not be obvious. Health experts recommend sexually active people, regardless of gender, age or sexual orientation, get tested every three to six months if they:

  • have a sexual partner with a known STI
  • have a new sexual partner or multiple or anonymous sexual partners
  • have previous history of an STI diagnosis
  • have been sexually assaulted

Prenatal care including syphilis testing is available for all Albertans. It is critical that anyone who is pregnant seeks early prenatal care and testing for syphilis during pregnancy.

Anyone experiencing STI-related symptoms should seek testing through their local health-care provider. Call Health Link at 811, visit a STI or sexual health clinic or speak to a family doctor to find testing and treatment options.

 

Quick facts

  • 2018 case counts for infectious syphilis by AHS zone:
    • South Zone: 31 cases, an increase of 138.5 per cent compared to 2017
    • Calgary Zone: 206 cases, an increase of 7.3 per cent compared to 2017
    • Central Zone: 88 cases, an increase of 266.7 per cent compared to 2017
    • Edmonton Zone: 977 cases, an increase of 305.4 per cent compared to 2017
    • North Zone: 208 cases, an increase of 324.5 per cent compared to 2017
  • For further breakdown of STI 2018 numbers, see the 2018 STI and HIV Summary Report.
  • Alberta Health works with AHS and community organizations towards prevention, health promotion, outreach testing, education, harm reduction, and addressing stigma. Previous actions include:
    • Grants to the Alberta Community Council on HIV to support community organizations across the province to prevent and reduce STIs, reduce harm associated with the non-medical consumption of substances and support health in their own geographic locations.
    • Alberta Health has provided three one-time grants totalling a combined $2 million since 2017 to combat the rising rates of STI, including syphilis, focusing on raising awareness and education, reducing stigma and increasing testing and treatment.
    • Since 2016, Alberta Health Services and Alberta Health have been working with over 100 provincial partners to develop innovative approaches to increasing access to STI services across the province.
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Health

Manitoba university cuts ties with Ebola researcher pending RCMP investigation

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Manitoba University severs ties with researcher during RCMP investigation

WINNIPEG — The University of Manitoba says it has cut ties with an Ebola vaccine researcher pending the results of an RCMP investigation.

A spokesperson says the school is ending the non-salaried adjunct appointments of Dr. Xiangguo Qiu and her husband Keding Cheng.

Qiu, a renowned virologist who received her original medical training in China, helped develop a vaccine for the Ebola virus at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Cheng also worked at the lab as a researcher.

The Public Health Agency of Canada said on Monday that it was taking steps to address an “administrative matter” at the lab after it advised the Mounties of possible policy breaches.

The laboratory is Canada’s highest-security infectious disease research facility dealing with deadly contagious germs.

Public Health said there is no risk to the public and the work of the lab continues.

The Canadian Press has been unable to reach Qiu or Cheng for comment.

The RCMP in Manitoba has confirmed it received a referral from the health agency, but has not confirmed whether Qui or Cheng is being investigated.

The Canadian Press

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