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COVID-19

Canada’s COVID vaccine contract with Pfizer emerges without cost per injection details

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7 minute read

From LifeSiteNews

By Anthony Murdoch

MPs are demanding the government disclose how much it spent on the vaccines

After being kept secret for over three years, certain details of the Canadian federal government’s COVID-19 vaccine contract with Pfizer for millions of doses of the experimental shots have been made public, albeit in heavily redacted form, and MPs are now demanding the government disclose just how much it spent on the jabs.

The federal government’s COVID jab contract was revealed by The Canadian Independent after it obtained the details through an access to information request. Although parts of the contract are heavily redacted, some give a clear insight that the Liberal federal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau knew there was no promise the shots would work and were 100 percent safe. It did also not disclose the total cost of the shots.

The “Manufacturing and Supply agreement between Pfizer and Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada” dated October 26, 2020, is 59 pages and includes a section that says the shots would not be serialized. When a vaccine is serialized, it is given a unique number or other identification that can track its complete journey through the supply chain.

LifeSiteNews verified with Public Services and Procurement Canada’s media department that the contract released by The Canadian Independent is genuine.

“Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) confirms this is a redacted copy of a contract between PSPC and Pfizer Canada ULC,” PSPC media relations representative Alexandre Baillairgé-Charbonneau wrote in an email to LifeSiteNews.

Fully redacted in the contract are sections 8 and 9, which likely relate to titled “indemnification” and “insurance and liability,” as was recently revealed by a leaked contract between Pfizer and South Africa.

Also mostly redacted is Section 3, which goes over “Price and Payment” terms.

Health Canada ordered 238 million COVID injections from Pfizer Canada, which includes some 30 million for 2023 and 2024. The total cost of just the Pfizer contract has not been revealed.

Asked about the contract with Pfizer Canada, the Department of Health declined to comment on the total cost, per Blacklock’s Reporter.

“When will the department divulge the costs per unit for the vaccine contracts?” New Democrat MP Matthew Green asked.

Public Works Minister Anita Anand has said that the “total cost” of the “envelope of funds for vaccines is about $8 billion,” but did not give a breakdown of how much the Pfizer deal was worth.

The Trudeau government also signed COVID-19 contracts with AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson, Medicago, Moderna, Novavax, and Sanofi. According to industry rates, the average price of a shot when sold to the United States was $19.50.

One Canadian company, Providence Therapeutics of Calgary, in 2021 told the House of Commons finance committee that the company had negotiated a price of $18 per dose with the Government of Manitoba.

Noted company CEO Brad Sorenson, “I’m not ashamed to say that Providence is making a fairly reasonable profit at that price.”

In a 2022 report, Canada’s Auditor General report said that the average price per shot was around $30 per dose.

Contract details were hidden from MPs

Najah Sampson, president of Pfizer Canada, had told the House of Commons public accounts committee in March that the contract was so secret that not even MPs could see it.

“Disclosure of our confidential agreement would be an extraordinary use of authority,” she testified.

Sampson claimed that having MPs request the contact information sent a “very concerning signal about how this country upholds its contractual obligations and could challenge its reputation as a reliable partner for future contracts across all business sectors.”

Patricia Gauthier, president and general manager of Moderna Canada, also told the same committee that the company’s contract with the Trudeau government was done on two “good faith principles” of transparency with officials and protection of its confidential information and intellectual property.

As a result, Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) MPs have called for a parliamentary committee to investigate the severe losses related to COVID jab development to hold both Public Health and the federal government of Trudeau accountable.

The Trudeau government, with the help of the Department of Health, heavily promoted the COVID jabs, which were rushed to market. It is still promoting the shots, this time the recently approved booster.

In 2021, Trudeau said Canadians “vehemently opposed to vaccination” do “not believe in science,” are “often misogynists, often racists,” and questioned whether Canada should continue to “tolerate these people.”

A recent study done by researchers at the Canada-based Correlation Research in the Public Interest found that 17 countries have a “definite causal link” between peaks in all-cause mortality and the fast rollouts of the COVID shots and boosters.

LifeSiteNews reported last month how the Polyomavirus Simian Virus 40 (SV40), which is a monkey-linked DNA sequence known to cause cancer when it was used in old polio vaccines, has been confirmed by Health Canada to be in the Pfizer COVID shot, a fact that was not disclosed by the vaccine maker to officials.

Last week, LifeSiteNews reported on how officials with Canada’s Department of Health have refused to release data concerning internal audits related to the COVID crisis that show “critical weaknesses and gaps” according to their own department memo.

COVID-19

Learning loss piles up alongside snow while ‘e-learning’ collects dust

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From the Fraser Institute

By Alex Whalen and Paige MacPherson

During COVID school closures, students in the province missed at least 125 days of school between March 2020 and February 2022, more than any other province (except Ontario), generating a significant learning loss from which students have not caught up.

In a world increasingly connected by technology, and given the Nova Scotia government recently spent tens of millions of dollars enabling at-home learning, one might think that students would seamlessly shift to online learning during the recent snowstorms to avoid losing crucial instructional time. Unfortunately, that’s not happening.

During COVID school closures, the Nova Scotia and federal governments spent at least $31.5 million dollars on “virtual school” and other technological upgrades so students could, according to the provincial government, “succeed, even in an at-home learning environment.”

Unfortunately, the electronic learning infrastructure—which includes Chromebooks, laptops and iPads for students and teachers, and additional support and new teachers for Nova Scotia Virtual School—is collecting dust in a corner while Nova Scotia kids are falling further behind.

This isn’t some blip in an otherwise strong record of instructional time for Nova Scotia students. During COVID school closures, students in the province missed at least 125 days of school between March 2020 and February 2022, more than any other province (except Ontario), generating a significant learning loss from which students have not caught up.

Indeed, according to the latest results (2022) from the Programme for International Assessment (PISA), the gold standard of testing worldwide, Nova Scotia 15-year-olds trail the Canadian average in reading by 18 points and trail the Canadian average in math by 27 points. For context, PISA characterizes a 20-point drop as one year of lost learning.

Moreover, between 2003 and 2022, Nova Scotia student performance in reading dropped by 24 points—more than one year of learning loss—and dropped by 45 points in math. In other words, in math, 15-year-old Nova Scotia students today are more than two years behind where Nova Scotia 15-year-olds were in 2003.

These troubling trends underscore the need to put the existing e-learning infrastructure to work. During a recent two-week period, students in the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional Centre for Education school district missed seven days of school due to snow. And some students missed an additional five days due to weather and power outages. That’s nearly three weeks. While more instructional time is not a silver bullet for student success—and with power outages, e-learning is not a perfect solution—it could still make a big difference.

According to international research, missed classroom time causes learning loss and impacts children for life, reducing their life-long earnings. Nova Scotia education researcher Paul Bennett found that lost classroom time due to inclement weather compounds absenteeism and sets back student achievement and social progress.

The Houston government should ensure that Nova Scotian students have access to teacher-directed e-learning when schools are closed and, like other jurisdictions in Canada and the United States, abandon the practise of simply cancelling school due to inclement weather. It’s simply common sense. The snow may pile up, but there’s no good reason why learning loss must pile up with it. Parents are right to demand access to the e-learning they’ve already paid for through their tax dollars.

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COVID-19

Nova Scotia judge sues chief judge, provincial court over Covid vaccine status and judicial independence

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News release from the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms

The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is providing for the legal representation of Judge Rickcola Brinton of the Provincial Court of Nova Scotia in a lawsuit against The Honorable Pamela S. Williams, former Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Nova Scotia, among others. Brinton was threatened by Williams with suspension and referral to the provincial Judicial Council after she chose not to disclose her Covid vaccination status in late 2021. She filed her claim in the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia on September 29, 2023, seeking damages for the intentional violation of her judicial independence and medical privacy.

On September 29, 2021, Brinton received an email (sent to all judges of the Nova Scotia Provincial Court) from Judge Williams, then Chief Judge, asking if they would agree to share their vaccination status with each other. Chief Judge Williams also asked whether the Court should share that information with the Nova Scotia Bar.

On October 1, 2021, Brinton replied, “I realize I may be in the minority…as I have concerns with medical privacy,” she wrote. “I also know that the vaccination mandates and passports may be disproportionately impacting racialized communities. And as an essential service, will we be creating a two-tiered society for those who already feel as though we are not all free to serve them?” She thus declined to disclose her vaccination status.

In an effort to persuade her, Chief Judge Williams met with Brinton on October 7, 2021. Brinton explained that her decision not to disclose her vaccination status was a matter of conscience and the result of prayerful contemplation. She offered to get tested for Covid as often as needed, but Chief Judge Williams rejected Brinton’s proposal.

At the end of October, Brinton went on short-term disability leave. She submitted the required Proof of Illness form completed by her doctor.

On November 1, 2021, Chief Judge Williams sent out an email to all judges stating that “only fully vaccinated judges will be assigned to sit in our courtrooms.” Four days later, on November 25, 2021, she issued a public statement announcing that “[a]ll Provincial Court judges presiding in courtrooms, both now and in the future, are fully vaccinated.”

A few months later, on February 22, 2022, Chief Judge Williams wrote to Brinton stating that she would not approve the continuation of the short-term leave unless Brinton provided evidence of her disability. She also wrote that if Brinton continued to refuse to disclose her vaccination status, she would be “considered non-vaccinated and unable to preside over in-person trial and sentencings in the Court Room,” and that she would have “no recourse other than to suspend [Brinton] and refer the matter to the Judicial Council.”

Then, on March 27, 2022, without warning or Brinton’s consent, Chief Judge Williams wrote to Brinton’s doctor requesting that he supply her with details of Brinton’s medical issues. The doctor called Brinton to ask if she consented to this disclosure of medical information. She did not consent. The Chief Judge’s office followed up by calling the doctor’s office to once again ask for disclosure consent. Again, Brinton declined. Meanwhile, Brinton had provided necessary information to her disability benefits provider and had been approved for long-term disability.

Brinton has not received any communication from Chief Judge Williams since April 2022. Williams’ term as Chief Judge ended in August 2023. She continues to sit on the bench.

Judicial independence is a crucial and ancient constitutional principle, predating the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Brinton raised concerns about interference with medical privacy and the impact of disclosing her Covid vaccination status on the independence and impartiality of both herself and the Court, particularly with respect to cases where courts have been asked to rule on issues regarding Covid vaccines; for example, whether an employee who is terminated for not taking the Covid vaccine is eligible for EI benefits, or whether it was legal for post-secondary institutions to force students out of their programof study for not taking the vaccine. As a result of raising such concerns, Brinton was threatened with suspension and disciplinary action.

Brinton’s lawsuit names the Honourable Pamela S. Williams, the Office of the Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Nova Scotia, the Provincial Court of Nova Scotia, and the Attorney General of Nova Scotia representing His Majesty the King in Right of the Province of Nova Scotia, as defendants.

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