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Alberta

Airdrie Man Arrested for Firearms “Straw Purchasing”

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2 minute read

May 14, 2020
Airdrie Man Arrested for Firearms
Straw Purchasing

Calgary… An ALERT investigation has resulted in the arrest of a 22-year-old Airdrie man for firearms straw purchasing.

ALERT Calgary’s organized crime team alleges that Brady Fisher lawfully acquired multiple firearms, which were then distributed to the criminal market. Fisher was arrested on May 12, 2020, with the assistance of Airdrie RCMP and the Calgary Police Service.

Fisher purchased seven restricted firearms and at least two unrestricted firearms dating back to November 2016. One of the handguns purchased by the accused was later seized during an Edmonton Police Service drug investigation in June 2019.

This handgun, allegedly purchased by Brady Fisher, was seized during an Edmonton Police Service drug investigation in June 2019.

The Edmonton seizure kickstarted ALERT’s investigation, with Wood Buffalo RCMP also sharing intelligence.

Five of the firearms remain unaccounted for, while three restricted firearms were voluntarily surrendered.

“We have no idea where these firearms may show up, or what crimes they may have been used in. People engaged in firearms straw purchasing are callously putting public safety at risk,” said Insp. Shawn Wallace, ALERT Calgary.

Straw purchasing typically involves someone with a valid Possession and Acquisition License (PAL) but no criminal record obtaining firearms for someone who otherwise could not, or who does not want their name associated with the transaction.

Fisher has been charged with five counts of firearms trafficking and three counts of possession of a firearm in an unauthorized place.

Members of the public who suspect drug or gang activity in their community can call local police, or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Crime Stoppers is always anonymous.

ALERT was established and is funded by the Alberta Government and is a compilation of the province’s most sophisticated law enforcement resources committed to tackling serious and organized crime.

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Alberta

Alberta Mounties charged in shooting death of man in car to get jury trial

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WHITECOURT, Alta. — Two RCMP officers charged in the shooting death of a 31-year-old man in northern Alberta will be getting a jury trial.

Cpt. Randy Stenger and Const. Jessica Brown of the Whitecourt RCMP detachment were arrested in June and initially changed with criminal negligence causing death.

Earlier this month, the charges were changed to manslaughter.

The pair appeared Tuesday in Whitecourt provincial court and, court documents say, there was an election for a jury trial.

No trial date was set, and the next court date is Oct. 13.

Alberta’s police watchdog has said the officers found Clayton Crawford sleeping in a vehicle in July 2018 and he was shot multiple times during a confrontation.

Susan Hughson, executive director of the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT), has said prosecutors were consulted for their opinion and her team determined charges were warranted.

Hughson said it was the first time in the Alberta agency’s history that a police-involved shooting resulting in a death led to criminal charges against officers.

ASIRT has said that the responsibility for the prosecution was transferred to the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General at the request of the Alberta Crown Prosecution Service.

The manslaughter charges were laid on Sept. 3, after consultation with the Ontario Crown, ASIRT said.

Both officers were suspended with pay after charges were laid. Stenger, 43, has 12 years of service with the RCMP and 29-year old Brown has four.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 22, 2010.

— By Daniela Germano in Edmonton

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Tampa Bay Lightning succeeding in NHL playoffs by adding grit, sinew, sandpaper

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EDMONTON — The Tampa Bay Lightning have turned their Stanley Cup final with the Dallas Stars into a best of five because, to quote Tampa head coach Jon Cooper and paraphrase “The Untouchables,” you can’t bring a knife to a gunfight.

Cooper says his team’s renewed commitment to grit and defence has been the biggest change from the high-scoring squad that won 62 games and the NHL’s President’s Trophy in 2019 only to get humiliated in a four-game sweep in the first round by the Columbus Blue Jackets.

“We used to be a team that (believed) it wasn’t good enough to beat you 3-0, we had to beat you 9-0. And we had to change that attitude,” Cooper told reporters on a Zoom call Tuesday.

“If you play that way, especially when you get to this time of year (in the playoffs), bad things are usually going to happen.”

“I think experience and being humbled can help right a ship,” he added. “And I truly believe (that after) last year’s experience, we’re seeing, I don’t know how to say it, the fruits of that awful setback.”

Since then, Tampa general manager Julien BriseBois has airlifted in a planeload of chapped leather and sinew.

In the summer of 2019, he signed battle-tested veterans Pat Maroon and Kevin Shattenkirk to complement existing scrappers like Ryan McDonagh, Erik Cernak and Cedric Paquette.

At this year’s trade deadline, BriseBois signed defenceman Zach Bogosian and surrendered a top prospect and top draft picks for forwards Blake Coleman and Barclay Goodrow.

Coleman and Goodrow, alongside Yanni Gourde, have solidified the checking and neturalizing on the third line, giving more space for slick-for point-getters like Brayden Point and Nikita Kucherov.

Cooper said there has also been an attitude adjustment on the rest of the roster, to commit to collectively keeping the puck out of the net.

The proof of that resilience came in Game 2 Monday night. The Stars smacked and belted Kucherov all over the ice in the opening minutes only to see the slick Russian bounce back and set up two power-play goals on elite-level, seeing-eye set-up passes.

After the Stars closed the gap to 3-2 early in the third period, the Lightning shut them down, taking the play to them on the forecheck and locking down the win to tie the best-of-seven series at one game apiece.

They outhit the Stars for the second consecutive game (107-100 combined after two games).

McDonagh knocked Stars forward Blake Comeau out of the game with a clean open-ice high-speed hit late in the second period, with Comeau leaving clutching his side and now questionable for Game 3 Wednesday.

Paquette got put in a head lock by Stars uber-agitator Corey Perry. When Perry released him at the direction of the refs, Paquette turned on Perry, raining blows down on him.

Cooper, in a post-game interview, said, “You’ve got to stick up for yourselves and not give the other team an inch.

“You can’t go into these (games) with (the plan to) bring a knife and they bring a gun. You’ve got to load up, too.”

Dallas head coach Rick Bowness said the fact the players have been isolated in a hotel for two months between games, away from family and friends, to avoid contracting COVID-19, is causing the bad blood to boil just a little bit higher.

“When there’s absolutely no change in your routine from day to day, (except) for a couple of days here or there, in eight weeks, you get a little edgy,” said Bowness. 

“The things you normally do to relax between games, whether it’s going out for dinner with your wife, go for a drive, or going to a driving range and hit golf balls … is not there.”

The Stars gave up three consecutive power plays in the last period of Game 1, but survived, then gave up three in a row in the first period of Game 2 and got burned. Bowness said that must change.

“When you keep taking undisciplined penalties it’s going to bite you in the butt, and it did last night,” he said.

Stars forward Andrew Cogliano said at this late stage it comes down to will and resolve, echoing the answer to the decisive question posed to “Untouchables” chief crimebuster Eliot Ness: What are you prepared to do?

“As you get deeper in the playoffs, the teams are so good that what separates you sometimes is whoever wants it more,” said Cogliano.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 22, 2020.

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

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