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Alberta

A simple question from a daughter. A special connection to a horse. Another chance to defeat the demons.

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4 minute read

If you know the racetracks in Saskatchewan and Alberta there’s a very good chance you’ve run into the name Tyler Redwood.  Tyler has been racing Standardbreds his entire adult life.  Driver of the year in Saskatchewan in 2009, 2011, and 2012, he was on top of his game until addictions knocked him off his horse so to speak.  One late fall night in September 2012, Redwood drove an ATV into a tractor, shattering his jaw and threatening his career.   He was losing his battle with alcohol and drugs.  He was falling into depression. He tried to take his own life.

Fortunately, Tyler Redwood kept coming back to his horses.  There was something in the relationship with an animal who needed love and a horse lover who had something to give.  Shoeing a horse,  brushing a horse, just spending time with an animal, especially the ones others are giving up on. Redwood has always enjoyed sharing a little love with the majestic animals.  On his toughest days he admits horses give him something special in return.

One after another the tracks closed in Saskatchewan and Redwood was faced with a life changing decision.  Would he move onto a different pursuit?  Or would he pursue his passion somewhere else?  In the end it was his passion that would save him.  Tyler moved his family to Central Alberta and became a bit of a fixture at Century Downs and The Track on 2.  But moving his loved ones away from their family members was a struggle, especially considering his demons followed him.  As Redwood tried to establish himself in Alberta, depression was sometimes getting the better of him.   Suicidal and dependent, spending all his free time isolated from his family in the garage,  it was a question from his daughter that sparked the much-needed change in Tyler’s life.

In the clear way only children speak in she asked her father why he was spending all his time in the garage and not with her and her 2 siblings.  The question cut Redwood to the bone.  The next day he pursued the help he would need to put him on a path to recovery.   Other than one setback on August 11, 2018, Tyler has been strong.

One of his great loves now is his relationship with his horse Star Flight.  Star Flight was struggling on the track just like Redwood when he got a chance to ride her.  He felt something in her and a conversation with the owner turned into an eventual purchase.  The two troubled souls bonded and the relationship sparkled on the track. The struggling horse started to win.  Six victories later Star Flight was a finalist for Claiming Filly / Mare of the Year at the 2021 Alberta Standardbred Horse Association Awards.

With a new love in his life, his children nearby, and horses to spend time with Tyler Redwood has come to recognize a new strength. Now he feels strong enough to share his story with others who are struggling.  In the following video he shares a beautiful message on behalf of The Canada Suicide Prevention Service.  Here’s “Redwood Redemption” an inspirational testament to the day to day struggles of an Alberta horseman.

If you’re thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved one, the Canada Suicide Prevention Service is available 24/7 for voice and 4pm to 12am ET for text.

The Canada Suicide Prevention Service

Need help? Call and connect with our responders now at 1-833-456-4566.  

Between 2 pm and 10 pm (Alberta time) you can send a text to 45645

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Alberta

Premier Smith announces plan to boost Alberta’s Heritage Fund to at least 250 Billion by 2050

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From CPAC on YouTube

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith delivers state-of-the-province address

In a televised address from Edmonton, Danielle Smith, the premier of Alberta, delivers an update on her government’s vision and legislative priorities.

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Alberta

Alberta looking to ban electronic vote tabulators ahead of next provincial election

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From LifeSiteNews

By Anthony Murdoch

electronic voting tabulators, which were supposed to speed up vote counting, instead saw election results delayed due with workers having to manually enter the results that each tabulator printed out.

The conservative Premier of Alberta, Danielle Smith, has confirmed she is looking to ban the use of electronic vote tabulators in future provincial elections after issues with them in the 2023 election saw massive delays in the tallying of votes.  

Smith, according to a report from True North, while speaking to a United Conservative Party (UCP) fundraiser on January 26 in the community of Bonnyville was asked if she would “end the use of voting tabulators across the province?” 

Smith replied with a firm “yes.” 

The 2023 Alberta provincial elections held in May saw Smith and her UCP win a majority, although a slim one, over the left-wing Alberta New Democratic Party (NDP).

Elections Alberta used what is called a Vote Anywhere Service, which allowed anyone to vote at any voting place regardless of which riding (jurisdiction) they were actually voting in. While paper ballots were used for the election, electronic tabulators were used to count the votes from all hand ballots. A form was then printed out with the result of each riding from the tabulators count of the hand ballots.  

However, the electronic voting tabulators, which were supposed to speed up vote counting, instead saw election results delayed due with workers having to manually enter the results that each tabulator printed out.  

Elections Alberta noted in June 2023, per True North, that “[w]e did not use any electronic data transfer from the tabulators, as the tabulators used for advance voting were never connected to a network at any time.” 

“As a result, it was a manual process to verify and enter these results.”  

As for Smith, before the 2023 election, she noted that she was confident in Elections Alberta’s plan to use electronic tabulators, as “we have the ability to do a hand count as a follow up in the event there are close results, I believe that’s going to be sufficient.” 

“That’s, I think, something that people expect in democracy – that you should be able to verify a vote if results end up very close,” she added.  

Elections Alberta, however, has pushed back on returning to hand counting ballots, saying it would increase the manual workload of employees.

There were many close results on election night, with the NDP losing a few seats by only a handful of votes in some Calgary ridings.  

Smith gave no timeline as to how or when she would make the change.

Many large municipalities in Alberta, including the province’s two biggest cities, Calgary and Edmonton, use electronic tabulators for ballot counting.

Issues surrounding electronic voting machines as well as tabulators came to a head in the aftermath of the 2020 U.S. presidential election, which saw Joe Biden declared the winner over Donald Trump. 

A report published by LifeSiteNews last year documented how a computer programmer, Clinton Eugene Curtis, who had previously testified to Congress on the integrity of voting machines, warned lawmakers in Arizona to never trust them.  

“Don’t use machines, because you can never, ever trust them to give you a fair election,” said Curtis. 

“There are too many ways to hack them. You can hack them at the level that I did when you first build them, you can hack them from the outside, you can hack them with programs that load themselves on the side. It’s impossible to secure them. You will never beat the programmer. The programmer always owns the universe.”  

Of note is that Curtis is a Democrat who had worked as a programmer for NASA, as well as the Department of Defense and other government agencies.

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