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Alberta

Why We Remember

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Why we remember 

To remember not only the fallen, but the sacrifices made by the living who have experienced horrors which are simply beyond the comprehension of the unindoctrinated. 

To acknowledge the sacrifice made by the families of the fallen, and of all those who have served and who are still serving. 

Because nobody ever truly comes home from war. Only a version of yourself returns. A haunted version, whose very soul has been irreversibly stained by the realization that Satan is in fact real, and he does indeed cajole decent people into doing awful things.

It’s the understanding of how unspeakably horrible one person can be to another. War forever taints you. Witnessing a flagrant disregard for the sanctity of life is not something you can unsee. It is this stain which affects every aspect of your civilian life, often for the rest of your life. 

We remember our soldiers because they bear a terrible burden, so that others will never have to carry the painful weight of freedom.

To acknowledge the privilege we enjoy, of living in a peaceful country where our children can safely walk to school without the fear of their school being bombed. 

We remember, because we acknowledge that we can’t ever fully appreciate the sacrifices, so we remember in lieu of understanding. 

We remember, because it’s the best we can do, and the least we should do to honor our soldiers, sailors, and airmen both past and present. 

We remember, because they likely know the unforgettable stench of burning human flesh, and the sound of the screams of the burning. 

We remember them, because they can not forget. 

We remember, because the survivors often struggle from debilitating depression, relentless nightmares, and uncontrollable anger. 

We remember because veterans are at a much higher risk of suicide. 

We remember them, because many of them can never find peace.

We remember them, because we don’t carry the burden of becoming them. 

On November the 11th, we will remove our hats, stand for our two minutes of silence, and we will remember them. 


Mark E. Meincke
Veteran
Host of: Operation Tango Romeo, the trauma recovery podcast 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

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Alberta

Vaccines, oil prices and Husky takeover boost Cenovus outlook, says CEO Alex Pourbaix

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CALGARY — The CEO of Cenovus Energy Inc. says he’s optimistic that his oil and gas company’s second consecutive online annual shareholders meeting webcast on Wednesday will be its last.

Alex Pourbaix says the global rollout of vaccines to counteract the COVID-19 pandemic gives him hope that next year’s meeting will be held in person, with the possible addition of a simultaneous webcast for out-of-town investors.

In their first shareholders’ meeting since Cenovus bought Husky Energy Inc., former Husky directors Canning Fok, Wayne Shaw, Frank Sixt and Eva Kwok were elected to Cenovus’s 12-member board. They had been appointed earlier under terms of the acquisition.

In January 2020, Cenovus committed $50 million over five years to build up to 200 houses to help alleviate a severe housing shortage in six First Nation and Metis communities near its oilsands operations in northern Alberta.

In an update on Wednesday, Pourbaix said the program resulted in 12 new houses completed in 2020 and 38 more expected to be ready by the end of this year. 

He said shareholders have much to celebrate, with Cenovus on the way to cutting net debt to $10 billion by year-end thanks to higher oil prices, along with the reinstatement of a dividend and a 96 per cent recovery in the share price between the October Husky acquisition announcement and the end of April.

“I think we can all agree that this past year has been one of unprecedented challenges for the world, for our industry and for Cenovus, and, yet, today I’m more optimistic about the future of the company than I have ever been,” he said.

“Cenovus is a stronger, more resilient, integrated Canadian energy leader thanks to our combination with Husky Energy.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 12, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:CVE)

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Man linked to B.C. and Alberta charged after woman's body found in national park

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LAKE COUNTRY, B.C. — A charge of second-degree murder has been laid against a 41-year-old man following the recent discovery of a woman’s body in Kootenay National Park in southeastern B.C.

A statement from RCMP says Philip Toner was arrested Tuesday in the Okanagan and will be returned to Alberta to face the murder charge.

The body of 35-year-old Brenda Ware was found last Thursday near her vehicle along a B.C. highway through the park, but investigators say they believe the alleged killing happened in Alberta.

Police say Toner and Ware were known to each other, but the nature of their relationship has not been described.

The statement says the “complex, interprovincial investigation” is still very active and police want to speak to anyone who may have had contact with Toner between May 4 and May 11 in either Alberta or B.C.

Drivers who might have picked up a hitchhiker travelling between B.C.’s Columbia Valley and the central Okanagan district of Lake Country on those dates are also asked to contact RCMP major crime detectives.

Toner appeared in provincial court in Kelowna Wednesday and police say the BC Prosecution Service received a seven-day remand in order to return him to Alberta.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 12, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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