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Alberta

Why We Remember

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Why we remember 

To remember not only the fallen, but the sacrifices made by the living who have experienced horrors which are simply beyond the comprehension of the unindoctrinated. 

To acknowledge the sacrifice made by the families of the fallen, and of all those who have served and who are still serving. 

Because nobody ever truly comes home from war. Only a version of yourself returns. A haunted version, whose very soul has been irreversibly stained by the realization that Satan is in fact real, and he does indeed cajole decent people into doing awful things.

It’s the understanding of how unspeakably horrible one person can be to another. War forever taints you. Witnessing a flagrant disregard for the sanctity of life is not something you can unsee. It is this stain which affects every aspect of your civilian life, often for the rest of your life. 

We remember our soldiers because they bear a terrible burden, so that others will never have to carry the painful weight of freedom.

To acknowledge the privilege we enjoy, of living in a peaceful country where our children can safely walk to school without the fear of their school being bombed. 

We remember, because we acknowledge that we can’t ever fully appreciate the sacrifices, so we remember in lieu of understanding. 

We remember, because it’s the best we can do, and the least we should do to honor our soldiers, sailors, and airmen both past and present. 

We remember, because they likely know the unforgettable stench of burning human flesh, and the sound of the screams of the burning. 

We remember them, because they can not forget. 

We remember, because the survivors often struggle from debilitating depression, relentless nightmares, and uncontrollable anger. 

We remember because veterans are at a much higher risk of suicide. 

We remember them, because many of them can never find peace.

We remember them, because we don’t carry the burden of becoming them. 

On November the 11th, we will remove our hats, stand for our two minutes of silence, and we will remember them. 


Mark E. Meincke
Veteran
Host of: Operation Tango Romeo, the trauma recovery podcast 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Father, Professional Development Trainer, Author

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Alberta

Smith won’t seek early vote if she wins UCP leadership, becomes next Alberta premier

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United Conservative Party leadership candidate Danielle Smith says if she wins this week’s vote and becomes the next Alberta premier, she would not call an early election to seek a broad mandate on her policy ideas.

Smith, the perceived front-runner in the race, says the public tends to punish leaders who call an early election.

She says she would wait until the next scheduled election in May 2023, but believes she has a mandate now to proceed with her plans.

Smith has said she would immediately pass an Alberta sovereignty act, which would allow the province to ignore federal laws and court rulings deemed not in its interest.

Legal experts, some of Smith’s leadership rivals and Premier Jason Kenney have labelled the act not only illegal but a recipe for constitutional and economic chaos.

Smith has also talked about revamping the health system by using health spending accounts and firing the board of Alberta Health Services, which oversees the front-line delivery of care.

Today is the last day for advance voting, as seven candidates dig in for the final campaign push before UCP members select a new leader to replace Kenney on Thursday.

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Alberta

Alberta commits $20.8 million over the next four years to fight human trafficking

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By Rob Drinkwater in Edmonton

The Alberta government is providing $20.8 million over the next four years to implement recommendations from a star-led task force on human trafficking.

Country singer Paul Brandt, chair of the Alberta Human Trafficking Task Force, personally thanked Premier Jason Kenney during the funding announcement Sunday at Edmonton International Airport for his willingness to prioritize the issue, and for putting faith in Brandt to lead the group.

“Premier Kenney’s longtime personal dedication and commitment to the issue of human trafficking is authentic and is admirable,” Brandt said.

“He’s the only political leader I’ve met in my 17 years of advocating for trafficking victims and survivors who took the time and initiative to personally write a plan to address this horrific crime.”

The money will establish an office to combat trafficking as well as a centre of excellence for research and data collection — recommendations the government accepted when the task force presented its report in March.

Justice Minister Tyler Shandro said the goal is to launch the office by next summer.

Other task force recommendations that will be supported include a new grant for community projects and Indigenous-led and culturally appropriate services. Civilian positions that will focus on supporting victims and survivors throughout human trafficking investigations will also be funded.

“Human trafficking is far more prevalent — way more common — than the stats would suggest because it’s a hidden crime,” Kenney said at the announcement.

“It festers in the dark. There are victims who face fear, shame and self-doubt and some who will never report what they’ve gone through.”

The task force was appointed in May 2020 and engaged with nearly 100 experts and survivors of trafficking to provide guidance on how to best implement the government’s action plan to fight human trafficking.

The government has said human trafficking includes sexual exploitation, forced labour trafficking and trafficking in human organs or tissues.

Kenney, who will be replaced as premier when his United Conservative Party selects a new leader on Thursday, noted he started fighting human trafficking over 20 years ago when he was an MP and joined a group of international parliamentarians on a coalition to fight the practice.

Later as Canada’s immigration minister, he said he took steps to make it easier for human trafficking victims who had migrated to Canada to obtain safety and protection.

In winter 2019, he said he committed the UCP to a nine-point action plan to combat human trafficking, which led to the Protecting Survivors of Human Trafficking Act, which took effect in May 2020.

Brandt said it was exciting to be part of the funding commitment at the airport, where he said he stood in 2019 for a partnership with the facility and other groups in the Edmonton region to fight trafficking, which he called “modern day slavery.”

“It has been our dream that special focus and permanent funding would one day become a reality. Today is that day,” Brandt said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 2, 2022.

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