Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

Why We Remember

Published

3 minute read

Why we remember 

To remember not only the fallen, but the sacrifices made by the living who have experienced horrors which are simply beyond the comprehension of the unindoctrinated. 

To acknowledge the sacrifice made by the families of the fallen, and of all those who have served and who are still serving. 

Because nobody ever truly comes home from war. Only a version of yourself returns. A haunted version, whose very soul has been irreversibly stained by the realization that Satan is in fact real, and he does indeed cajole decent people into doing awful things.

It’s the understanding of how unspeakably horrible one person can be to another. War forever taints you. Witnessing a flagrant disregard for the sanctity of life is not something you can unsee. It is this stain which affects every aspect of your civilian life, often for the rest of your life. 

We remember our soldiers because they bear a terrible burden, so that others will never have to carry the painful weight of freedom.

To acknowledge the privilege we enjoy, of living in a peaceful country where our children can safely walk to school without the fear of their school being bombed. 

We remember, because we acknowledge that we can’t ever fully appreciate the sacrifices, so we remember in lieu of understanding. 

We remember, because it’s the best we can do, and the least we should do to honor our soldiers, sailors, and airmen both past and present. 

We remember, because they likely know the unforgettable stench of burning human flesh, and the sound of the screams of the burning. 

We remember them, because they can not forget. 

We remember, because the survivors often struggle from debilitating depression, relentless nightmares, and uncontrollable anger. 

We remember because veterans are at a much higher risk of suicide. 

We remember them, because many of them can never find peace.

We remember them, because we don’t carry the burden of becoming them. 

On November the 11th, we will remove our hats, stand for our two minutes of silence, and we will remember them. 


Mark E. Meincke
Veteran
Host of: Operation Tango Romeo, the trauma recovery podcast 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Father, Professional Development Trainer, Author

Follow Author

More from this author

Alberta

Alberta announces next phase of COVID vaccinations, doses for about 437,000 residents

Published on

EDMONTON — Alberta’s health minister says 437,000 people can soon begin booking appointments for the next round of COVID-19 vaccinations.

Tyler Shandro says those aged 65 to 74 and First Nations, Inuit and Metis people aged 50-plus can begin booking March 15.  

The province has been able to accelerate vaccinations due to a third one being approved by Health Canada, the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

Shandro says the first 58,000 doses of AstraZeneca will available starting March 10.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has said while AstraZeneca is just as effective as the others, due to incomplete data it recommends it not be given to those over 64.

Shandro says for that reason, the AstraZeneca vaccine will be offered to adults 50 to 64 who don’t have a severe chronic illness.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 4, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Parkland blames pandemic as Q4 profits and revenue slide on lower fuel sales

Published on

CALGARY — Parkland Corp. is reporting lower fourth-quarter earnings and revenue as affects of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns continue to erode fuel sales.

The Calgary-based convenience store operator and fuel retailer says it had net earnings of $53 million in the last three months of 2020 on revenue of $3.47 billion, down from $176 million on revenue of $4.78 billion in the same period of 2019.

It says it sold 5.4 billion litres of fuel and petroleum products in the fourth quarter, a decrease of seven per cent compared with the year-earlier period.

It says lower volumes were offset by strong per unit fuel profit margins in Canada and in its international operations, as well as robust company convenience store same-store sales growth in Canada of around eight per cent and a healthy 90 per cent utilization of its Burnaby, B.C., refinery.

Parkland says it will hike its dividend by two per cent, its ninth consecutive annual increase.

The company says it plans growth capital spending of between $175 million and $275 million in 2021, along with between $225 million and $275 million in maintenance capital spending, including about $40 million of work deferred from 2020.

“In 2021, we will strengthen our customer offerings and continue our organic growth initiatives, advance our disciplined acquisition strategy and deepen our commitment to providing customers with low-carbon fuel choices as part of our broader sustainability efforts,” said CEO Bob Espey.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 4, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:PKI)

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading
;

Trending

X