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  • Know Ideas Media and Biology Fortified have hatched a plan to fix one the biggest communications challenges facing the Agriculture Industry: It’s image problem.

    The Media’s coverage of chemicals and biotechnology in Agriculture consistently relies improper or misleading images that misinform consumers, and give them faulty impressions of this industry.  While some uses of anxiety inducing images may be purposeful, (like when Anti-GMO groups use “needle-in-tomato” images to represent Genetic Engineering), sometimes it’s just a matter of correct images not being available to the media, (like when Glyphosate stories use generic spraying images that clearly are not the correct crop).

    The solution?  Let’s flood the internet with positive and accurate photos of Agriculture! Let’s put photos exactly where The Media will find them.  Let’s make it impossible for them to accidentally use a bad image by providing them with better images. This way, if a particular outlet chooses to use faulty images, we know they’re doing it on purpose.

    Plan 1: Copyright Free Images

    As explained in the video, head to Pixabay and create a profile. Then, take some brilliant photos, and upload them! Again, we need shots of chemical use and chemical handling, as well as anything to do with “GMO” on the farm. Add as many accurate tags as you can, and DON’T FORGET to add the tag #AgBioPix (so we can keep track of this campaign) This will positively impact what shows up in Google when you search for copyright free images of Ag chemicals, or GMO.

    Plan 2: Pay to Play Stock Image Sites

    (Biology Fortified is leading the charge on this part)
    If you consider yourself a “shutter bug” and you love snapping photos of farming, WE NEED YOU TO DO THIS.  Follow This Link to learn the strategy here, and then follow this link to submit your photos.  Biology Fortified will put in the significant hours required to ensure these images find their way into Getty, Shutter Stock, and others. Heck, if you want to execute Plan #1, but simply don’t have the time, use the submission form to submit photos and we’ll take care of it!

    Let’s get it done! 🙂

    This video was produced independently by Know Ideas Media. Special thanks to Anastasia and Karl at Biology Fortified for taking on this project, and moving at a break-neck pace to get this up and running!


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    President Todayville Inc., Former VP/GM CTV Edmonton, Honorary Lieutenant Colonel 41 Signal Regiment, Board Member Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Award Foundation, Past Board Member United Way of Alberta Capital Region, Musician, Photographer.

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    Ag meets Food

    WATCH: If the media is right… we’re all doomed! Glyphosate and other class 2 carcinogens

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  • I want to address a couple of issues with the video. First, this is a very quick overview. So quick in fact, that it borders on over-simplifying a really important concept: Hazard vs. Risk. For example, when I say “hairdressing is just as likely to cause cancer” it would have been more accurate to say it’s just as hazardous as glyphosate.  I don’t think it ruins the overall point of the video, so I hope this note will suffice as correction.
    I also said “all shift work is carcinogenic”, which is also not quite accurate enough. The IARC’s definition of the kind of work that is carcinogenic is a bit fuzzy to begin with, but they do clearly state that they mean work that disrupts your circadian or light cycles. That  means work at odd hours more than it means 9 to 5 work. The fuzziness comes in because you can totally have a 9 to 5 job and not get natural light cycles as a result. In Canada, if you have an indoor job 9 to 5 in the winter and you aren’t near a window, you can go the whole week without seeing the sun. (I’ve experienced that personally) Also, if you aren’t going to bed early enough, getting up at 7:30 for a 9am job can disrupt your circadian cycles. I should have been more accurate, but the IARC’s words leave quite a bit open to interpretation. They are in fact revising their monograph on shift work in the near future to make it more clear.
    That being said, their whole system of categorization is a little unclear, and can be tough to explain.  This video is about a ruling by The International Agency for Research on Cancer that we’ve all been hearing a lot about. The IARC says glyphosate (also known as Roundup) is carcinogenic. According to the media and anti-glyphosate interests, that means we’re all pretty much doomed. (Thanks a lot, Monsanto) But… before you get all riled up, maybe you should see some of the other things that IARC says are just as hazardous as glyphosate.
    Does it really matter to you if glyphosate is safe, or do you hate it no matter what because Monsanto invented it?
      
    Be honest with yourself. 

    More information on IARC’s carcinogen classification system:
    The post this video was based on:
    This video was produced independently by Know Ideas Media


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    Ag meets Food

    How Do GMO Apples Taste?

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    Anti-GMO personalities would have you believe our food system is rife with GMO food crops of all kinds. Large fruit? Must be GMO. Oddly shaped or different? G. M. O. However, contrary to that line of thinking, there were only 9 GMO crops approved for cultivation in North America, until the Arctic Apple was approved as number 10 in 2017.

    The Arctic Apple, made by Okanagan Specialty Fruits, has been genetically modified to not oxidize when sliced.  The Arctic Apple doesn’t turn brown.  That seems like a significant change to the apple, but as Nick Saik explains in this video, the process to create a non-browning apple is surprisingly minimalist- just turn off the expression of 4 genes. The result is an apple that doesn’t spoil as quickly. Okanagan Specialty Fruit is using the science of Genetic Engineering to take a bite out of food waste.

    In today’s video, Nick sees what all the fuss is about, and taste tests Arctic Apple’s Apbitz snacks.

    This is NOT a sponsored video. This video was produced independently by Know Ideas Media


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