Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"]

Alberta

Alberta justice minister sorry for saying feds, others rooting for COVID disaster

Published

5 minute read

EDMONTON — Alberta’s justice minister says he was wrong to accuse Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government, Alberta’s Opposition N-D-P, and the media of rooting for COVID-19 to buckle his province’s health system.

“I would like to offer an apology for my recent comments on my personal Facebook account,” Kaycee Madu wrote on Twitter Tuesday night.

“Alberta is facing an unprecedented public health crisis. My comments were wrong, as all Canadians want this global pandemic to end as soon as possible.

“I fully support the premier’s recent call to avoid the divisive political rhetoric during what we all hope is the final period of this pandemic and will continue the important work of government in protecting Albertans from this virus.”

The apology came a day after Madu’s spokesman, Blaise Boehmer, told reporters in a statement that Madu was standing by his accusations, adding, “The minister won’t apologize for stating the obvious.”

Earlier Tuesday, prior to Madu’s apology, Trudeau rejected the accusations.

“It’s a shame to see people pointing fingers and laying blame and suggesting that anyone in Canada wants anything else than to get through this pandemic as safely as possible everywhere,” Trudeau said in Ottawa.

Premier Jason Kenney, also asked about Madu’s comments prior to the apology, said he hadn’t seen them but said, “COVID has caused us a lot of us at various times to say things we regret, and I just encourage everybody — whatever side of the political spectrum they’re on — to give each other a break right now.”

Trudeau noted he reached out to Kenney and Alberta’s big city mayors last week to offer further support if called upon. Kenney declined the offer.

“Every step of the way the federal government has been there to support Canadians, with $8 out of every $10 in pandemic support coming from the federal government,” said Trudeau.

The issues of blame and responsibility have recently been at the centre of debate in Alberta. Kenney’s government has been criticized for waiting weeks to respond with tighter health restrictions to the current third wave that now threatens to overrun the health system if left unchecked.

Alberta has recently had COVID-19 case rates that are the highest in North America.

Kenney acted with renewed rules a week ago, closing schools and introducing sharper limits on businesses and worship services.

He also stressed now is not the time to lay blame. Prior to that, Kenney and his ministers had repeatedly accused Trudeau’s government of hamstringing the relief effort with a slow vaccine rollout. As late as April 29, Kenney blamed Alberta’s entire third wave on Ottawa.

Last Friday, Madu, in a Facebook post, wrote that the province couldn’t risk giving the COVID-19 virus a chance to “overwhelm our health-care system.

“That’s what the NDP, the media and the federal Liberals were looking for and want,” he wrote.

NDP Leader Rachel Notley said her caucus has done its job as the Official Opposition.

She said they’ve pushed Kenney’s government to enact rules to reduce the spread of the virus, while giving businesses financial aid to survive and workers support to allow them to isolate but still provide for their families.

Notley added, “You don’t tend to see that sort of incendiary, thoughtless messaging or tone from someone who takes on the role of justice minister.”

Dr. Deena Hinshaw, the chief medical officer of health, reported 24,998 active COVID-19 cases Tuesday. There are 705 people in hospital with the illness, 163 of them in intensive care — the highest since the pandemic began.

Hinshaw confirmed the province won’t give out more first doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine for the time being.

“Based on global supply challenges, we do not know when Canada, and in turn Alberta, will receive additional doses,” said Hinshaw.

There are 8,400 doses left, which will be used for second shots.

Hinshaw also said they will wait at least 12 weeks between AstraZeneca doses, given current research is showing that the interval delivers the best protection.

Alberta has administered more than 255,000 first doses of AstraZeneca.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 11, 2021.

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

Storytelling is in our DNA. We provide credible, compelling multimedia storytelling and services in English and French to help captivate your digital, broadcast and print audiences. As Canada’s national news agency for 100 years, we give Canadians an unbiased news source, driven by truth, accuracy and timeliness.

Follow Author

Alberta

UCP backbencher fined $15K by Elections Alberta for funding violations

Published on

EDMONTON — A United Conservative backbencher has been fined $15,000 by Elections Alberta for a variety of offences including filing false financial statements.

Devinder Toor, the legislature member for Calgary Falconridge, was penalized for fundraising and spending infractions both as a candidate for the party nomination and well as in the 2019 election.

The 10 violations also include exceeding expense limits and accepting a prohibited contribution from a numbered company of which Toor had been a director.

Toor, a first-time MLA, won the constituency seat by just 91 votes over the rival NDP.

The NDP,  in a news release, called on Toor to resign, saying the infractions display a conscious effort to circumvent the rules and call into question his integrity and fitness for public office.

Toor could not be immediately reached for comment. 

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

CP Rail reports record second quarter revenues of $2.05 billion

Published on

CALGARY — Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. reported record second quarter revenues of $2.05 billion Wednesday.

The Calgary-based railway reported earnings of $1.25 billion for the three months ended June 30, up from $635 million in the same period last year. CP Rail’s adjusted earnings per share were $1.03, a 27 per cent increase from $0.81 last year and a second quarter record.

The company also declared a quarterly dividend of $0.19 per share, payable in October.

The company’s operating ratio, a key measure of railroad efficiency where a smaller number is better, increased by 301 basis points to 60.1 per cent from 57.0 per cent. Included in that metric are $308 million in expenses related to CP’s efforts to acquire Kansas City Southern.

In May, KCS formally backed a merger offer from CP rival, Montreal-based Canadian National Railway Co. KCS paid a US$700-million termination fee for backing away from its previous agreement to be purchased by CP.

CP says it is continuing its application process to acquire KCS, in case the CN deal is terminated or CN cannot otherwise acquire KCS.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 28, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:CP)

The Canadian Press

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version incorrectly referenced the termination fee KCS paid to CP.

Continue Reading

Trending

X