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Alberta

Handguns and drugs seized in million-dollar bust

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News Release from ALERT (Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team)

One million dollars’ worth of drugs was seized, along with multiple firearms, in an ALERT investigation that spread across northern Alberta.

On November 2, 2021 ALERT Edmonton’s organized crime and gang team executed multiple search warrants in effort to disrupt an intraprovincial drug trafficking network. Three homes in Edmonton were searched and targeted vehicle stops were conducted in Red Deer and Whitecourt.

“ALERT’s investigation revealed the Edmonton-based group was aggressive in supplying smaller cells in Grande Prairie and Red Deer. By leveraging our criminal intelligence, and coordinating ALERT’s resources, we were able to undermine their operations by intercepting significant shipments of harmful drugs,” said Inspector Kevin Berge, ALERT Edmonton.

The totality of ALERT’s enforcement efforts netted one million dollars’ worth of drugs, including the seizure of:

  • Three handguns;
  • 645 rounds of ammunition;
  • 8,578 grams of meth;
  • 1,317 grams of fentanyl;
  • 2,850 milliliters of GHB;
  • 3 grams of cocaine;
  • 57 opioid pills;
  • 17,260 grams of buffing agents;
  • 929 grams of unknown powders; and
  • $16,255 cash.

All three of the firearms were found with ammunition and not lawfully possessed. One of the firearms was believed to have been 3-D printed and was equipped with a suppression device. ALERT will be submitting the firearms for further analysis and ballistics testing.

Five people were arrested but no charges have been laid at this time.

Members of the public who suspect drug or gang activity in their community can call local police, or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Crime Stoppers is always anonymous.

ALERT was established and is funded by the Alberta Government and is a compilation of the province’s most sophisticated law enforcement resources committed to tackling serious and organized crime.

Alberta-owned independent media company. We specialize in local, regional, and national news and information. We promote events, businesses, organizations in the Edmonton region. Contact us at [email protected]

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Alberta

Flames looking for ‘foundation’ after Game 2 loss: ‘We’re playing into their hands’

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CALGARY — Tyler Toffoli doesn’t recognize this version of his team.

And if the Flames don’t get back to what’s made them successful all season, Calgary could be in big trouble against its high-flying provincial rival.

Toffoli scored in the second period to give the home side a 3-1 lead Friday, but the Edmonton Oilers stormed back with four unanswered goals to secure a 5-3 victory that evened the teams’ second-round playoff series 1-1.

“Since I’ve been here we’ve done a really good job of playing our type of hockey,” said Toffoli, who was acquired from the Montreal Canadiens in February. “The past two games here we haven’t really been playing to our foundation.

“It’s been getting away from us.”

The Flames — normally creatures of a well-defined structure — weren’t thrilled with their performance in a wild 9-6 victory in Game 1 of the first post-season Battle of Alberta in 31 years.

Calgary was even less enthused after Connor McDavid and Co. scored consecutive goals on the power play, at four-on-four and shorthanded to grab hold of proceedings and send the best-of-seven matchup to Edmonton even ahead of Sunday’s Game 3.

“They’re a high-scoring team,” Flames head coach Darryl Sutter said. “The individual skill sets for them can win hockey games.

“That was the difference tonight.”

The feeling from the Flames in the wake of Friday’s loss was they’re fine as long as the action remains at five-on-five.

But when the likes of McDavid and Leon Draisaitl, who combined for two goals and three assists, get a chance to start wheeling around the offensive zone with more space is when Calgary gets into trouble.

“We’re playing into their hands,” Flames defenceman Noah Hanifin said. “When you’re playing those four-on-fours and you’re short a lot, it’s tough when their top guys can touch the puck and feel it a bit.

“We’ve got to clean that up.”

Toffoli lamented his team’s lack of discipline in a game that was there for the taking — especially early.

“We took too many penalties,” the winger said after the Oilers connected on one of their six power plays. “We’ve got away from our type of game and started playing their game. When that happens they have guys that can do some of the things that they did.

“We didn’t do a good job.”

So why has Calgary strayed from a style that got the club to the top of the Pacific Division at the season’s most critical juncture?

“I’m not really sure,” Toffoli said. “It’s something that we have to talk about within ourselves. At the end of the day, I’ve said last series as well, nobody’s going to do it — it’s only us.

“We have to find a way to get back to it and play five-on-five hockey and take over games.”

Calgary jumped out to a 2-0 lead just over six minutes into Friday’s contest after pushing ahead 3-0 in Game 2, but allowed Edmonton to find its footing.

“The main thing for us is just trying to keep it five-on-five,” Hanifin said. “We’re having good starts. We like our game at five-on-five.

“It’s just when we start getting into those situations where it’s four-on-four and stuff, it’s not to our advantage, not our game, and they have success.”

Toffoli, who won the Stanley Cup with the Los Angeles Kings in 2014, said the Flames simply need to get back to their old, trusted habits as the series now shifts to the Alberta capital.

“It’s playoff hockey, it’s not going to be perfect every single night,” he said. “Things happen within a game and we have to stay composed.

“If we stay five-on-five we’re in a good spot.”

So far in this series, however, that’s been easier said than done.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 20, 2022.

___

Follow @JClipperton_CP on Twitter.

Joshua Clipperton, The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirms another case of 'bird flu' in B.C.

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RICHMOND, B.C. — The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a small flock of poultry in Richmond, B.C.

The agency did not provide information on the number of birds infected by H1N1, or the type of poultry.

It says while the so-called bird flu is not a food safety concern, it is spreading across the globe and anyone with birds must use preventive measures like securing their property by a fence.

It says small flocks are at risk of contracting viruses like avian influenza, especially if they have access to ponds or bodies of water known to be used by wild birds.

H1N1 can also be spread on the clothing and shoes of visitors and employees moving from flock to flock, through contaminated feed, water, bedding and farm equipment as well as via airborne particles and dust blown by the wind.

B.C.’s Agriculture Ministry said this week that avian flu had been found in a commercial flock in the Fraser Valley, home to 80 per cent of the province’s poultry farms.

Avian flu cases have been confirmed in several other provinces, but no infections have been detected in humans.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 20, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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