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Alberta

Alberta Sports Hall of Fame 50/50 ends today

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Alberta Sports Hall of Fame’s 50/50 raffle has only 9 hours left and sitting at $18,000. Funds will be used to purchase a new interactive display for the museum. If you can help by purchasing a ticket and/or sharing the story, please do. Thank you for your support in these tough times here at the hall of fame, it is very much appreciated.

Learn more about the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame

 

The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame provides a family-friendly, interactive experience. You will be surprised by what you discover inside! Have fun, laugh, play and discover Alberta sports heroes together. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame is an interactive, hands-on celebration of Alberta's sporting history. Our over 7,000 square feet of exhibit space includes a multisport area with virtual baseball, basketball, football, hockey, and soccer; an adaptive sports area, including a 200 meter wheelchair challenge; a Treadwall climbing wall; the Orest Korbutt Theatre; the Hall of Fame Gallery; an art gallery displaying works by provincial artists, and much more. Our venue boasts a collection of over 17,000 artefacts of Alberta sports history and showcases many of these items in a number of displays. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame also offers an education program, group activities, and a unique environment to rent for your birthday party, special event, corporate reception or meetings.

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Alberta

CP NewsAlert: Alberta lifts some COVID-19 economic restrictions, delays others

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EDMONTON — Alberta is lifting more economic restrictions tied to COVID-19 while delaying others.

Premier Jason Kenney says low intensity group activities, like Pilates, can resume in fitness centres, and libraries can open at 15 per cent capacity.

But he says loosening measures for retail shops, hotels and community centres can’t happen yet.

He says COVID-19 cases have plummeted in long-term care homes and hospitalizations have dropped, but cases of the variant are worrisome.

Some medical experts, including the Edmonton Zone Medical Staff Association, warned the province last week against loosening public-health measures.

This is Stage 2 of a four-stage plan to reopen the economy announced by Kenney a month ago.

In Stage 1, restaurants were able to reopen for dine-in service, gyms were allowed to resume one-on-one fitness training and some restrictions were lifted on youth sports.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Women provide successful test of Calgary’s curling bubble ahead of Brier

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CALGARY — All systems are go for the Canadian men’s curling championship after the women proved elite curling can happen in a pandemic.

Curling Canada says no one tested positive for the COVID-19 virus during the Scotties Tournament of Hearts which concluded Sunday in Calgary.

In an arena with no spectators, Kerri Einarson’s team from Gimli, Man., claimed a second straight title.

“We said at the start of the week if we sent everybody home healthy, then we did our job,” said Curling Canada’s Nolan Thiessen, who among his many titles is director of event presentation, innovation and athlete liaison.

“The women that came and participated did amazing. They took everything seriously. They just did whatever they needed to do to make sure they could compete. 

“Proof of concept. They’ve shown it can be done. It’s on everybody else who descends into the bubble to do what we need to do.”

About 500 on-site tests were conducted during the Hearts with no positive tests, Thiessen said Monday

The Hearts was the first of four Curling Canada events relocated to Calgary in a hub-city model walling participants off from the general public.

The men start arriving Tuesday in Calgary for the men’s national championship, the Tim Hortons Brier, opening Friday at WinSport’s Markin MacPhail Centre.

The 35-team field for the national mixed doubles March 18-25 will be announced Tuesday. The men’s world championship follows April 3-11. 

A pair of Grand Slams, which are Rogers Sportsnet’s properties, are also scheduled for Calgary in April.

The women were confined to the arena and their hotel on either side of Trans-Canada Highway in Calgary’s west end, and drove themselves back and forth in rental cars.

They bought into testing and self-isolation before and after arrival in Calgary, regular temperature checks, mandatory masks off the ice, and no socializing at the hotel with other teams with nary an eye roll or sigh, Thiessen said.

The women accepted Curling Canada needed to do what Alberta Health required so they could curl.

“There were times when they were like ‘oh, what are we supposed to be doing here?’ but not in a bad way,” Thiessen said. 

“We have a chief medical officer on site and they are responsible for that piece of it. It wasn’t a curling person making a medical decision.  

“Any time we told them anything health and safety related, they knew it was us passing on the information.”

Northwest Territories third Jo-Ann Rizzo’s bout of food poisoning on the first night of the tournament was a test run of some pandemic protocols.

While the CMO was convinced it was a stomach bug, Rizzo was tested anyway. She and her teammates isolated in their rooms all day awaiting the result.

N.W.T.’s game against Canada that day was postponed two days to what was a morning off for all teams.

“It definitely showed a good reason why we kept a draw open in the middle of the week,” Thiessen said. “It showed a good reason for what our protocols were and why we put safety first.

“We’re not expecting to go this whole thing with every day going exactly according to plan and there’s no health issues. That hasn’t been the case with any sport.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 1, 2021.

Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press


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