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Agriculture

Workers who were trapped deep in Saskatchewan mine now safely back on surface

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SASKATOON — A fertilizer company says all 34 people who were trapped deep in a Saskatchewan potash mine for more than a day are now safely above ground.

Will Tigley, a spokesman with Nutrien Ltd., said a service shaft stopped working at its Cory mine near Saskatoon on Tuesday.

On Wednesday evening, the staff took a separate elevator normally used to transport potash to the surface.

“We are happy to confirm that we have all of our 34 people above ground,” he said.

“For the most part, all of our employees were in good spirits and we got some of our other employees to drive them home to their families.”

Tigley said no one was hurt.

“We went with the best option available to use and we chose the safest and most efficient one.”

He said the workers, who were about a kilometre underground during the ordeal, were safe and had plenty of food, water, power and contact with the surface.

Tigley said the workers were performing maintenance when they became trapped.

The Cory mine is not currently producing potash.

He said the cause of the mechanical problem will be investigated.

“We will investigate the cause, take the right precautions to ensure that it doesn’t happen again,” he said. “There were no injuries.”

Darrin Kruger, a staff representative with the United Steelworkers union, said because there was no emergency, such as a collapse or a fire, he believed the trapped workers didn’t have to be isolated in the mine’s underground safe rooms.

But he said there are still dangers with being underground for so long. Workers could have a medical emergency or run out of required medication.

“Underground is a confined space — one way in, one way out. And when that is compromised in some fashion, there are inherent risks.”

In May, dozens of Nutrien workers were trapped for several hours at its Allan potash mine after a fire broke out before they were safely brought to the surface. 

 

Companies in this story: (TSX:NTR)

 

 

 

 

The Canadian Press


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Agri-Culture

Kraay Family Farm Celebrates 20 Years of Farmtastic Fun

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July 17, 2019 | Lacombe, AB –

from Kraay Family Farm

Kraay Family Farm is proud to celebrate 20 years of growing memories – your memories and ours!

The Kraay Family Farm is excited to announce that in honour of a milestone two decades of operation, the 2019 corn maze design honours and celebrates 20 years of family-friendly farm fun. The maze covers 15 acres of land and incorporates the Kraay Family Farm 20-year logo.

“We often get questions about why there is a crow in our logo. Our family is Dutch in origin and the name ‘Kraay’ actually means ‘Crow’ in Dutch. That, and there are a lot of crows around here!” explains Rachel Kraay. Rachel and Reuben Kraay own the farm together with Reuben’s parents, Ed and Linda Kraay.

“We are so grateful for the many guests who have encouraged, supported and had fun with us over these last 20 years! To own and operate a business where we get to watch our kids and our community’s kids grow up and to be part of families enjoying time together is amazing and truly a blessing for us,” says Rachel Kraay, one of the owners of the Kraay Family Farm.

Ed and Linda started the farm as a means to supplement the income from their small hog farm. Reuben was traveling after high school and visited a similar type of farm with a corn maze and other agritainment attractions and suggested the idea to his parents. “Ed and Linda like to have fun and try new things so, together with friends of theirs, they started the farm on a whim one year with just a corn maze, a slide, and a few picnic tables and fire pits,” continues Kraay, “The farm has just grown from there! Reuben and I joined his parents in 2005 after our first child was born and we’ve been adding to the farm ever since!”

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Agriculture

Scrapie, a disease related to mad cow, found in two flocks of sheep in Alberta

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Scrapie disease in Central Alberta

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says some sheep in Alberta have been infected with scrapie, a fatal disease that affects the animals’ nervous system.

The federal agency’s website says classic scrapie, which can be transmitted to other sheep and goats, was confirmed last month in two Alberta flocks.

Scrapie belongs to the family of diseases that includes mad cow disease in cattle, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.

Health Canada says there is no known link between scrapie and human health.

The CFIA says scrapie can only been seen in adult sheep between two and five years of age and can take years to develop.

Once an animal appears ill it typically dies within a few months.

The Canadian Press

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