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Assange refuses extradition to US; long legal fight expected

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LONDON — WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange told a London court on Thursday that he wouldn’t agree to be extradited to the United States, where he is accused of conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer.

Assange, appearing by video link from a London prison, said he wouldn’t “surrender myself for extradition for doing journalism that has won many awards and protected many people.”

Wearing jeans and a sports jacket, Assange appeared calm during the brief hearing at London’s Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

Judge Michael Snow said it would likely be “many months” before a full hearing was held on the substance of the U.S. extradition case. The judge set a procedural hearing for May 30, with a substantive hearing to follow on June 12.

The 47-year-old Australian was sentenced Wednesday to 50 weeks in prison in the U.K. for jumping bail in 2012 and holing up in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. At the time, he was facing extradition to Sweden for questioning over rape and sexual assault allegations made by two women.

Assange says he sought asylum because he feared being sent to the U.S. to face charges related to WikiLeaks’ publication of classified U.S. military documents.

U.S. authorities accuse Assange of scheming with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to break a password for a classified government computer.

Manning served several years in prison for leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks. She was jailed again in March after refusing to testify to a grand jury investigating the secret-spilling organization.

Ben Brandon, a lawyer representing the U.S. government, said in court Thursday that U.S. investigators had obtained details of chatroom communications between Manning and Assange in 2010. Brandon said the pair had “engaged in real-time discussions regarding Chelsea Manning’s dissemination of confidential records to Mr. Assange.”

He said the documents allegedly downloaded from a classified U.S. computer included 90,000 activity reports from the war in Afghanistan, 400,000 Iraq war-related reports, 800 Guantanamo Bay detainee assessments and 250,000 State Department cables.

The U.S. charge against Assange carries a maximum five-year prison sentence, but he is worried the U.S. could add further, more serious allegations against him.

“The fight has just begun. I will be a long one and a hard one,” said WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson, who claimed Assange was being held in “appalling” conditions at Belmarsh Prison. He said Assange was confined to his cell 23 hours a day, “what we call in general terms solitary confinement.”

A few dozen WikiLeaks supporters holding signs reading “Free Assange” and “No extradition” gathered outside the London courthouse before Thursday’s hearing.

Some who had waited for two hours hoping to get in were bitterly disappointed when those seats were filled by journalists and lawyers. They shouted angrily at court staff and complained they were being discriminated against for backing Assange. Some later blocked a busy main road outside the court, bringing traffic to a halt.

Assange was arrested last month in London after his relationship with his embassy hosts went sour and Ecuador revoked his political asylum.

Jill Lawless And Gregory Katz, The Associated Press











































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Military ombudsman demands independence now, accuses top brass of fighting oversight

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OTTAWA — Canada’s military ombudsman is demanding the federal Liberal government immediately grant his office true independence and oversight powers over the Canadian Armed Forces.

Ombudsman Greg Lick says numerous scandals and crises over the past 30-plus years have resulted in calls for external oversight of Canada’s military to protect troops and others.

That includes the current sexual misconduct scandal that is ripping through the senior ranks.

While governments and leaders within the Armed Forces and Defence Department have publicly agreed to such recommendations each time, Lick alleges such agreement has been a facade.

Lick says senior commanders and defence officials have in reality fought to protect their kingdoms from outside interference, while successive governments have looked away.

Lick, who is releasing a report today, says there have been enough studies and reviews and that if independent oversight isn’t established now, service members will continue to suffer.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 22, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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Cleanup underway in Quebec town after tornado that left one man dead

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MASCOUCHE, Que. — A Quebec town just north of Montreal is cleaning up today in the aftermath of a tornado that tore through Monday afternoon.

A man died after trying to take shelter in his shed in Mascouche, Que., while two other people were injured when the tornado touched down at around 4 p.m.

Mayor Guillaume Tremblay says the city was caught off guard by the twister, but its emergency response plan was quickly put into action and worked well.

A spokesperson for the town says nearly 100 buildings were damaged by the tornado, and the Red Cross said between 50 and 100 people were being taken care of with offers of food, clothing and temporary shelter.

Environment Canada confirmed from videos and photos posted online that a tornado had occurred. It had issued severe thunderstorm watches for many areas of southern and central Quebec, due to high humidity and high temperatures.

The agency is expected to dispatch a specialist to the scene to examine the severity of the damage and get a better idea of the tornado’s strength.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 22, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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