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Agriculture

UPDATE February 4: The Alberta SPCA lays more Charges in Horse Neglect Investigation

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  • From the Alberta SPCA

    The Alberta SPCA lays additional 27 charges against third individual in connection to Horse Neglect Investigation

    ***Update***
    The Alberta SPCA has laid an additional 27 charges under the Animal Protection Act against a third person in connection with a horse neglect investigation. CORNELL, Robert Hugh (60) of the Evansburg area faces nine charges of causing an animal to be in distress 2(1), nine charges of failing to provide adequate food and water 2.1(a), and nine charges of failing to provide adequate care when an animal is wounded or ill 2.1(b). Cornell is scheduled to appear in Evansburg court on March 11, 2019

    ***Original Release***

    The Alberta SPCA has laid 54 charges against two people in connection with horses in distress on two properties west of Edmonton. Charged are MOORE, Patricia Lynn (48), and ATKINSON, Ross Andrew (50) of the Evansburg area.

    In early December 2018, The Alberta SPCA received a complaint from a member of the public of numerous horses in distress or dead on a property in the Evansburg area. Peace Officers attended and their investigation led the Peace Officers to a second property in the same area. As a result of the investigation, the Alberta SPCA has laid 27 charges each against the two individuals listed above under the Animal Protection Act (APA) of Alberta. Each individual faces nine charges of causing an animal to be in distress 2(1), nine charges of failing to provide adequate food and water 2.1(a), and nine charges of failing to provide adequate care when an animal is wounded or ill 2.1(b).

    The two persons charged are scheduled to appear in Evansburg court on March 11, 2019.

    We would also like to note that there was a lot of false information circulating on social media during the investigation that often became a distraction to the work of our Peace Officers. Our time and resources were often diverted to deal with these rumours, taking away from our ability to manage other investigations in the province. Proper investigations take time and often involve the gathering of forensic evidence. Our Peace Officers always appreciate the patience and understanding of the public when we are gathering evidence to support laying charges.

    The Alberta SPCA has laid 54 charges against two people in connection with horses in distress on two properties west of Edmonton.

    Charged are MOORE, Patricia Lynn (48), and ATKINSON, Ross Andrew (50) of the Evansburg area.

    In early December 2018, The Alberta SPCA received a complaint from a member of the public of numerous horses in distress or dead on a property in the Evansburg area. Peace Officers attended and their investigation led the Peace Officers to a second property in the same area. As a result of the investigation, the Alberta SPCA has laid 27 charges each against the two individuals listed above under the Animal Protection Act (APA) of Alberta. Each individual faces nine charges of causing an animal to be in distress 2(1), nine charges of failing to provide adequate food and water 2.1(a), and nine charges of failing to provide adequate care when an animal is wounded or ill 2.1(b).

    The two persons charged are scheduled to appear in Evansburg court on March 11, 2019.

    We would also like to note that there was a lot of false information circulating on social media during the investigation that often became a distraction to the work of our Peace Officers. Our time and resources were often diverted to deal with these rumours, taking away from our ability to manage other investigations in the province. Proper investigations take time and often involve the gathering of forensic evidence. Our Peace Officers always appreciate the patience and understanding of the public when we are gathering evidence to support laying charges.


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    President Todayville Inc., Former VP/GM CTV Edmonton, Honorary Lieutenant Colonel 41 Signal Regiment, Board Member Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Award Foundation, Past Board Member United Way of Alberta Capital Region, Musician, Photographer.

    Agriculture

    “The Family Farm” is a poignant short film about a farmer’s relationship with the land

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  • Anna Kuelken was not even born when I left Fort Assiniboine in the early 1980’s to pursue a life that didn’t include farming. I wasn’t particularly well-suited to it, though for the first 18 yeas of my life, I knew little else.

    Anna was raised on a family farm in that same tiny community a few hundred kilometres NW of Edmonton. Her experience may not have differed much from my own; things don’t change quickly in a community of 150 hardy souls more than 200 miles from the nearest city, in this case Edmonton.

    Her father Peter and I were of a similar generation.  Although a few years older than me, we grew up attending the same small school, and knowing most of  the same people.  To give a sense of size, there were 19 in my high school graduation class, the 2nd largest in history. Our people farmed for the most part, and almost all had other jobs off the farm to support their habit. Today the notion of the “family farm” is challenged more than ever in its history.

    While the family farm I was raised on has been gone from the family for 3 decades, Anna is still very attached to land she grew up on.  She recently submitted this short film she produced about her father’s relationship with the land. It examines the changing dynamic and circumstance of the family farm; at times seeming very much like the now almost 40 years removed from my own day to day experience, and yet, not that different.  Farmers still work off the farm to support their habit, just like my dad did in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. It remains a solitary and noble lifestyle for those who have survived.

    I hope you enjoy this glimpse into the relationship between a farmer and the land they farm.

    Anna’s father Peter Kuelken provides some background:
    …This  farm and I became acquainted in 1958. I was 2 years old and was the child of immigrant parents who loved us as dearly as they did the country they had come to. It was at a very young age that I was taught about the power of the land. I learned from my parents the importance of the respect for the air the water the soil and the life that flourished there. In my later years returning to the farm was because of the love that had been in my life from my family and community.
    My return was because of the sense of security of this life that was imbedded in my soul as a child.   The miracle of life that emerged constantly around us and the curiosity it created was something that my wife and I wanted our children to embrace and have in their lives. We also followed the path of the conventional agriculture but returned to a holistic model that is sustainable.  We now use technology and the tools that it provides to be better stewards of this land.   I am so proud now that my children carry this flag of stewardship in its truest sense.  They now have become like our indigenous people in the understanding of the importance of this land which sustains us. The circle of life continues…”

    by Peter Kuelken

    Read more stories from Todayville.com. 


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    Agriculture

    A mental health crisis on the farm

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  • At first David Eaton though he was extremely lucky.  He suffered an injury at work but it could have been so much worse.   David was struck in the head by a 20 tonne hydraulic jack.  Physically he faired well, a few stitches would be all he’d need.  But in the ensuing months David’s wife Cyndy started to see a different personality emerging in her husband.  He was angry, upset, and emotional.  Cyndy didn’t know just how bad it was for David, until he eventually decided to share with her just how depressed he had become since his head injury.

    From AgSafe Alberta

    AgSafe Alberta Society is a collaboration of crop and livestock sector producer groups that have come together to develop and deliver farm safety management tools, resources and programs for farmers and ranchers in the province of Alberta.  The goal is to enable farm businesses to take the next step to establishing practical farm safety management programs that will help enhance the development of a ‘safety culture,’ where safety is a fully integrated part of the farm business.”

    AgSafe sent Ben Wilson of Benjo Productions to produce a feature on David’s situation.  David Eaton was struck in the head by a 20 tonne hydraulic jack, here is his story

    Click here for information about services provided by AgSafe Alberta Society.


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    february, 2019

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