Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

National

‘Shelves will be empty:’ Supply of food in question after fire at Iqaluit store

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • IQALUIT, Nunavut — Grocery retailers were moving Thursday to ensure critical supplies remained available in Nunavut’s capital after a fire destroyed significant parts of Iqaluit’s largest retail store.

    Another outlet stepped up to say it would accept a freighter-load of supplies originally intended for Northmart, where the fire broke out late Wednesday.

    “We have committed to the full freighter of inventory that was already in transit,” said Duane Wilson of Arctic Co-operatives, which owns Iqaluit’s other grocery store. “That’s probably (already) on the ground.

    “There’s going to be inventory in the community. There’s no immediate cause for panic.”

    Wilson added that Arctic Co-operatives will also increase its regular Friday air freight shipments to Iqaluit.

    The Northmart store offered everything from clothes to furniture to snowmobiles, as well as places to eat or sit for a coffee.

    “It’s the hub of the community,” said resident Mike Hadfield.

    “You go every day. There’s always something that you need.”

    When he heard about the fire, he headed to the Arctic Co-operatives store to stock up.  

    “I went down there to make sure I got my milk and bread and cream and eggs, perishables to last me a week. Within 10 minutes of me leaving the store, I drove by again and you couldn’t find a parking spot within three blocks.

    “Their shelves will be empty by the end of the day.”

    Mayor Madeleine Redfern said the blaze started at the back of the building and had already destroyed the warehouse and several other facilities.

    “From what I’m seeing of the residents’ reactions, everyone is in shock and disbelief … very concerned,” she said. “We initially hoped the fire could be put out very quickly. Everyone is just waiting to see what the final outcome will be.”

    Redfern said a number of people work at the store, so “it’s a significant employer and a provider of products.”

    A nearby elders care home was evacuated as a precaution and Iqaluit residents were being asked to conserve water so that emergency crews would have an adequate supply for firefighting efforts.

    A school across from the store was closed for the morning.

    Most perishable food is flown year-round into the city of 7,700, while non-perishable food items and hard goods come in by sea.

    “The issue is ensuring that the other retailers are able to bring in enough supplies on an ongoing basis,” Redfern said. “In these situations, it’s important that we work together for the common good.”

    By late morning, most of the flames had been extinguished, although black smoke continued to billow, Hadfield said. Onlookers crowded the street.

    “There’s a lot of people gathered.” 

    A spokeswoman for the government said the territory was looking into whether it has a role in keeping Iqaluit fed.

    “The (territory) is working closely with the city of Iqaluit to provide any and all support. Cold and heated storage (is) available for food storage if and when needed,” said Nasra Esak of Community and Government Services.

    The Health Department was working to ensure people get their medications.

    The RCMP were investigating the cause of the fire.

    — By Ken Trimble and Bob Weber in Edmonton

    The Canadian Press




    If you like this, share it!

    National

    Feds poised to bolster RCMP accountability

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — The federal government is poised to try to improve RCMP accountability by placing some external eyes on the national police force.

    Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki are expected to announce the plans at a news conference in Ottawa on Wednesday.

    The long-anticipated move is the latest attempt at rebuilding the force following years of sagging morale over internal bullying and harassment.

    Insiders say the measures to be announced Wednesday are the beginning of a process that involves several steps to ensure the force benefits from independent advice and scrutiny.

    The announcement will represent the Liberal government’s response to two critical 2017 reports.

    In the first, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP said the force lacked both the will and the capacity to address the challenges that afflict its workplaces.

    The commission urged the government to usher in civilian governance or oversight for the paramilitary-style police force.

    The second report, a review by former auditor general Sheila Fraser of four harassment lawsuits from female members, also called for substantial reforms.

    At the time, Goodale said both reports described “similar serious and long-standing concerns” and would “inform further action” to ensure that the RCMP is a healthy and respectful employer.

    Lucki became the RCMP’s first permanent female boss last year when she took over the commissioner’s post from Bob Paulson.

    Before he left, Paulson delivered an apology to hundreds of current and former female officers and employees who were subjected to discrimination and harassment dating back as far as four decades.

    The words of regret came as the Mounties settled class-action lawsuits stemming from allegations that cast a dark pall over the force.

    The Trudeau government has directed Lucki to modernize and reform the RCMP’s culture, protect employees from harassment and workplace violence, and foster reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

    Goodale’s mandate letter to Lucki, issued last year, also asked her to make the force representative of Canada’s diverse population by embracing gender parity and ensuring that women, Indigenous members and minority groups are better reflected in positions of leadership.

    Another priority is implementing measures to improve health and wellness after an auditor’s report found the force was failing to meet the mental-health needs of its members due to a lack of resources, poor monitoring and meagre support from supervisors.

    Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    National

    Google wants court to decide whether search curbs would infringe charter rights

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — Google wants the Federal Court to decide whether limiting search-engine results in the name of privacy would infringe Canadians’ constitutional guarantee of free expression.

    The leading internet search engine advocates broadening an upcoming court hearing to squarely address the question.

    Privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien has asked the Federal Court to clarify if Google’s popular search tool is covered by the law governing how companies handle personal information.

    A man who says a Google search reveals outdated and highly personal information about him will be the test case that helps a judge decide whether the search engine must remove the links from its results.

    Therrien argues the federal law on private-sector use of personal information includes such a right to de-indexing.

    In documents filed with the court, Google says the privacy commissioner’s reference application is illogical and inefficient because it is too narrow and therefore won’t fully explore the relevant constitutional questions.

    The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    january, 2019

    mon14jan - 31jan 1410:00 amjan 31Kindergarten Registration Begins at Red Deer Public SchoolsRegister your child for Kindergarten10:00 am - 3:00 pm (31)

    wed16jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    wed16jan7:00 pm- 9:00 pmPerfectionism or Healthy Striving? An Emotional Intelligence WorkshopAre you curious? 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

    thu17jan - 26jan 177:30 pmjan 26Ignition Theatre Presents: GRUESOME PLAYGROUND INJURIESPulitzer prize finalist Rajiv Joseph’s Gruesome Playground Injuries7:30 pm - 11:00 pm (26)

    sat19jan10:00 am- 5:00 pm2019 Healthy Living ExpoHelping Albertans live healthy, sustainable lives10:00 am - 5:00 pm

    sat19jan11:00 am- 2:00 pmCentral Alberta Refugee Effort and Catholic Social Services Annual Client and Volunteer Partyshare culture through food and music11:00 am - 2:00 pm

    sat19jan1:00 pm- 4:00 pmMAGSaturday @ the MuseumMAGnificent Saturdays welcomes all ages and abilities to participate in a fun art project every week! 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

    wed23jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    sat26jan9:00 am- 5:00 pmChildhood Anxiety: Understanding & Helping Children Heal Workshop9:00 am - 5:00 pm

    sat26jan1:00 pm- 4:00 pmMAGSaturday @ the MuseumMAGnificent Saturdays welcomes all ages and abilities to participate in a fun art project every week! 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

    sat26jan8:00 pm- 10:30 pmRobbie Burns Night8:00 pm - 10:30 pm

    mon28jan11:30 am- 1:30 pmLending Cupboard Presents Jann Arden in 1st annual Winter LuncheonJann Arden \"Winter Luncheon\"11:30 am - 1:30 pm

    tue29jan5:00 pm- 7:00 pmRed Deer and District Chamber of Commerce presents: January Business After Hoursnetworking event 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

    tue29jan7:00 pm- 11:30 pmLive Country Music @ Bo's Bar and GrillAaron Pritchett w/ Guest Kira Isabella and David James7:00 pm - 11:30 pm

    tue29jan7:00 pm- 12:00 amPaul BrandtThe Journey Tour 20197:00 pm - 12:00 am

    wed30jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    Trending

    X