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Some facts and figures about the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944

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OTTAWA — Some facts and figures about the D-Day landings in Normandy on June 6, 1944:

TARGET: Allies land on French channel coast along five Normandy beaches stretching about 80 kilometres west from River Orne.

BEACHES: From west to east, Utah (U.S.); Omaha (U.S.); Gold (Britain); Juno (Canada); Sword (Britain).

FEATURES OF JUNO: Eight-kilometre strip of summer resorts and villages scattered over flat land behind low beaches and a sea wall. Many Canadians in first wave race to cover of sea wall. D Company of Queen’s Own Rifles loses half its strength in initial sprint from water to seawall about 180 metres away.

ENEMY AT JUNO: About 400 soldiers of 716th Infantry Division man concrete gun positions sited to fire along beach. Zones of fire calculated to interlock on coastal obstacles intended to rip bottoms out of invading boats. Gun positions protected by mines, trenches, barbed wire.

SHIPS: More than 7,000 vessels manned by 285,000 sailors. Royal Canadian Navy contributes 110 ships and 10,000 sailors.

SOLDIERS: 130,000 ashore by nightfall, including about 14,000 Canadians.

VEHICLES: 6,000 tracked and wheeled vehicles and 600 guns land.

PLANES: More than 7,000 bombers and fighters available. Allied planes fly about 14,000 sorties June 6, against about 250 by Luftwaffe.

D-DAY CASUALTIES (killed, wounded and missing): Canada: 1,074, including 359 killed; U.S. 6,000; Britain: 3,200. Germany figures unreliable because of confusion in retreat.

CAMPAIGN CASUALTIES (killed, wounded and missing): In 2-plus months of Normandy campaign (June 6-Aug. 21) Germans lose 450,000 soldiers, Allies 210,000. Canadian casualties total more than 18,000, including more than 5,000 dead.

ALLIED LEADERS: Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower (U.S.), Supreme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Force. Gen. Sir Bernard Law Montgomery (Britain), Field Commander, D-Day Forces.

CANADIAN LEADERS: Gen. Harry Crerar, Commander 1st Canadian Army. Maj.-Gen. Rod Keller, Commander 3rd Canadian Infantry Division.

DIVISIONS INVOLVED: Canadian 3rd Infantry Division; British 3rd and 50th Infantry Divisions; U.S. 1st and 4th Infantry Divisions. (All had armoured units attached).

The Canadian Press

COVID-19

Video attacking Canada’s response to COVID created by Conservative leadership hopeful is going viral

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This video was posted by MP Erin O’Toole.

The RCAF veteran, and former Minister of Veterans Affairs is running to replace Andrew Scheer and hoping to become Canada’s next Prime Minister.

The video is a scathing review of Canada’s response to the COVID-19 crisis.  It has already been viewed well over half a million times.

From the Facebook page of Erin 0’Toole  

The Truth About COVID-19

➡️ The Chinese regime, the WHO and the Trudeau government DO NOT want people to see this.Let's make sure Canadians see the truth! 👍🇨🇦

Posted by Erin O'Toole on Thursday, May 21, 2020

 

NDP makes support for suspending Commons contingent on permanent sick leave

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National

Canadian Forces Snowbirds release video of Jennifer Casey homecoming

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From the Facebook page of Canadian Forces Snowbirds 

You are joining us live from the Halifax International Airport for the homecoming of Captain Jennifer Casey, a military Public Affairs Officer who was killed in a CF Snowbirds crash during Operation INSPIRATION.

Homecoming of Captain Jennifer Casey | La capitaine Jennifer Casey rentre chez elle

You are joining us live from the Halifax International Airport for the homecoming of Captain Jennifer Casey, a military Public Affairs Officer who was killed in a CF Snowbirds crash during Operation INSPIRATION.#CFSnowbirdsNous sommes en direct à l’Aéroport international d’Halifax afin d’assister au retour de la capitaine Jennifer Casey, officière des affaires publiques militaire qui a perdu la vie dans l’écrasement d’un appareil des Snowbirds des FC pendant l’op INSPIRATION.#SnowbirdsFC

Posted by Canadian Forces Snowbirds on Sunday, May 24, 2020

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