Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Top Story CP

Saskatchewan man acquitted of threatening to shoot Trudeau and blow up Parliament

Published

NIPAWIN, Sask. — A Saskatchewan man accused of threatening to shoot Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and blow up the Parliament Buildings has been acquitted.

David Petersen, who is 53, faced a charge of uttering threats over the phone to a government worker on Feb. 12.

Judge Hugh Harradence told Nipawin provincial court today that he had reasonable doubt Petersen uttered the threats with intention.

Harradence said he believed the employee who took the call was sincere in trying to recall the conversation, but there was no recording or notes taken immediately after the call.

Petersen, who elected to defend himself, argued the whole case stemmed from a foolish conversation with someone he didn’t know.

Last March, he intended to plead guilty to the charges to get them out of the way.

But Judge Inez Cardinal wouldn’t accept Petersen’s plea after he said he didn’t believe he was guilty.

“I was scared as hell and I didn’t know what to expect,” Petersen said outside court Tuesday about the judge’s decision.

“I wasn’t trying to guess ahead of anything, but I’m not surprised.”

Paul Sveinson, a collection content officer for the Canada Revenue Agency, testified last week that he and Petersen talked about 10 times between October 2018 and the Feb. 12 call. He said Petersen sounded depressed and distraught during the last call and brought up Trudeau’s name after no previous mentions of politics.

Sveinson recalled Petersen’s exact words as being: “Between you and me, I’d like to take a shot at Trudeau” and “I don’t want to be the guy that goes and blows up Parliament.”

Sveinson added the sad, quick demeanour of Petersen’s voice caused him concern for Petersen’s well-being, which resulted in Sveinson contacting a department manager.

The employee also testified the call had initially been about Petersen’s life insurance and that caused Sveinson to believe it was a suicide call.

Harradence said there was a hole in the evidence about how Trudeau and the Parliament Buildings came into conversation.

“Context is critical,” Harradence said.

The trial also saw video of Const. Tanner Gillies from the Saskatchewan National Security Enforcement Section interviewing Petersen.

Petersen told Gillies during the interview the “take a shot” comment meant he would punch Trudeau in the nose if he was in front of him, not shoot him. He said he wouldn’t shoot Trudeau due to a moral belief that killing another human is wrong.

Gillies said in court that while Petersen appeared stressed and was sober, he didn’t think he was a threat to Trudeau. (CJVR)

The Canadian Press

Top Story CP

Trudeau was only one in dark makeup at 2001 party but nobody took offence: attendee

Published

on

trudeau blackface

VANCOUVER — A man who attended an “Arabian Nights” gala held by a private school in Vancouver says no one besides Justin Trudeau attended in skin-darkening makeup, but no one else there was dressed as Aladdin.

Wayne Hamill, who is white, says he doesn’t recall anyone expressing any offence over Trudeau’s costume or “brownface” makeup at the time.

Hamill went to the 2001 party because his kids were West Point Grey Academy students and he says the future Liberal leader’s costume was in keeping with the theme and others were dressed as belly dancers or wearing saris or veils.

He says he’s not a Trudeau supporter but he believes the uproar over a photograph showing Trudeau made up in brownface is unfair because it’s applying today’s standards to yesterday’s context.

Trudeau has apologized for the image and others that have emerged of him wearing skin-darkening makeup, saying he had a blind spot because of his privilege and he deeply regrets behaviour he now recognizes as racist.

He says in his 2014 book, “Common Ground,” that teaching at West Point Grey Academy gave him new insights into the “privileged lives” of private-school students that he didn’t glean from his own advantaged upbringing.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 20, 2019.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Top Story CP

Ontario Human Rights Commission unveils new policy to tackle racial profiling

Published

on

VAUGHAN, Ont. — Ontario’s Human Rights Commission says racial profiling in law enforcement is profoundly harmful.

It says the police practice hurts black, Indigenous and other racialized communities.

The commission today released a new policy on eliminating racial profiling called Under Suspicion.

It says it’s the first such policy in the country.

Recommendations include acknowledging the problem, collecting data on police stops and independent accountability.

It also calls for officers to wear body cameras.

 

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

september, 2019

tue06augAll Daysun29sepHot Mess - Erin Boake featured at Red Deer Museum and Art Gallery(All Day)

sun22sep2:00 pm4:00 pmVinyasa with a View2:00 pm - 4:00 pm MT Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre, 120 College Circle Event Organized By: Lululemon Red Deer

Trending

X