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Quebec police seek potential victims of former cop, coach accused of sex crimes

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LONGUEUIL, Que. — A former Montreal police officer and minor hockey coach is facing charges for alleged sexual infractions dating back decades and involving boys who at the time were aged between nine and 16.

Longueuil police said Wednesday they are seeking other possible alleged victims of Francois (Frank) Lamarre, 71, who has lived in the Montreal suburb of Greenfield Park for nearly 50 years.

He faces charges of gross indecency, indecent exposure, sexual assault, sexual touching and invitation to sexual touching involving four alleged victims.

The infractions are alleged to have been committed between 1972 and 1997 at Lamarre’s home, in his car and at arenas.

He was arrested Tuesday at his home and released under numerous conditions ahead of his Dec. 19 arraignment at the Longueuil courthouse.

Investigators believe there could be more victims because he was often in the company of minors during that time.

Lamarre, who retired from the Montreal police force in 1994, was a hockey coach in Greenfield Park from 1970 to 1980. Sgt. Patrick Barriere of Longueuil police said Lamarre’s status as an officer was known to the boys, but none of the infractions are alleged to have occurred while he was on duty.

“Those kids at the time might have moved elsewhere in Canada or the United States,” Barriere said. “One of the four victims is living outside the province right now.”

Some were youth involved in hockey, while other alleged victims lived in Lamarre’s neighbourhood.

Investigators arrived at the period of 1972 of 1997 after meeting with the victims, Barriere said, adding that other offences could have taken place before or after the dates.

Lamarre was between 24 and 49 years of age at the time and lived in homes on Springfield and Campbell Streets in the suburban community. Barriere noted that Lamarre often changed vehicles, and investigators are aware he drove Ford and Cadillac cars at the time.

“We know it takes a lot of courage for people to come forward when you’re a victim of that type of crime,” Barriere said. “But don’t worry, investigators are there to help.”

Under the conditions of his release, Lamarre is forbidden from contacting the four complainants and from being in the presence of minors or near parks, schools or community centres.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Dec. 4, 2019.

Sidhartha Banerjee, The Canadian Press

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Conservatives urge Morneau to deliver ‘urgent’ fall economic update

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OTTAWA — The Conservatives are calling on Finance Minister Bill Morneau to deliver an “urgent” fall economic update, including a plan to get back to balance.

Conservative MP Pierre Poilievre, the finance critic, says he wants to see the Liberal government provide a fiscal update before the holidays that would include tax cuts for entrepreneurs, efforts to get rid of regulatory red tape and a plan to phase out the deficit over the next few years.

The Ottawa-area MP notes the country lost about 71,000 jobs last month, according to Statistics Canada, which was the biggest monthly drop since the financial crisis of a decade ago.

Meanwhile, the American unemployment rate is the lowest it has been in half a century.

The re-elected Liberals promised during the fall election campaign to reduce the deficit to $21 billion by the fourth year of their mandate, while the Conservatives had promised to deliver a $667-million surplus in 2024-25.

Poilievre says the Liberals have had plenty of time since the October election to prepare a fiscal update.

“The storm clouds of our economy have been gathering overhead for a long time, so if they are this ill-prepared for the trouble that is unfolding, it says something about their ability to govern,” Poilievre told a news conference in Ottawa on Sunday.

Morneau says the first thing the Liberals plan to do is bring in their promised tax cut for the middle class. The economy is resilient, he said in a statement.

“While we will always remain vigilant to any potential risks to our economy, Canada has a stable and resilient financial sector that supports a strong and growing economy — an economy that continues to grow as we work with partners right across the country to address immediate and long-term challenges, including in the resource sector,” Morneau said Sunday.

The New Democrats also want Morneau to adjust his plans by making sure the proposed tax cut is implemented in a way that all benefits go to those earning less than $90,000 per year.

The NDP says this would reduce the cost of the tax cut by $1.6 billion, which the party says it could divert to dental care.

“We believe that this is a constructive proposal that would make a meaningful difference in the lives of millions of Canadians — particularly the people who are in greatest need,” said a letter the NDP plans to send to Morneau Monday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2019.

The Canadian Press


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Rescue dogs come to Canada in search of forever families

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There were dozens of dogs in the back of the van travelling the 1,400 kilometres from Tennessee to the Greater Toronto Area — and one of them was a barker.

The trip last year was one of the bigger rescue missions that Save Our Scruff has embarked on, this one in collaboration with another agency in the same line of work. The charities are part of a growing grassroots effort to bring dogs to Canada from places as far flung as Mexico, El Salvador and Egypt, where overpopulation is a far bigger issue.

Contrast that with Canada’s urban centres, where we’re “winning the war on dog overpopulation,” according to one Toronto city official.

Volunteers with the two groups in Tennessee stacked the crates in the back of the cube van and began the long drive home. Before that, they spent two days working on the farm where the dogs had been living.

Aside from the lone yappy passenger, the pups didn’t make too much fuss during the trip home, said Jenna Bye, executive director of Save Our Scruff. Because it was cool outside, the dogs were comfortable and less prone to complaining. In the summertime, it takes more planning and effort to keep the dogs from overheating.

But arranging such treks is far from a walk in the dog park.

“We just had over 100 dogs in care at the end of the summer,” said Bye. “That’s 100 dogs that have to be picked up, from generally the airport; that’s 100 dogs that have to go to the vet; 100 supply packages that we have to create and deliver.”

In their five years, Save Our Scruff has adopted out 1,700 dogs and counting, and Bye estimates that more than half are from outside of Canada. Twenty more dogs are currently listed on their website as available for adoption.

“Sometimes I feel like I’m running a logistics company,” she said.

Larger organizations such as the Humane Society International have been at it for far longer — Save Our Scruff took in its first dogs in 2014 — but Bye said she’s seen the number of independent groups like hers climb over the past few years.

The underlying reason for the popularity of such rescues is multi-pronged, beginning with a smaller supply of stray dogs in Canada, said Mary Lou Leiher, a program manager with Toronto Animal Services.

“I think it was about 2005 when it struck me that we were winning the war on dog overpopulation,” she said, noting that more dogs are being spayed, neutered and microchipped, so stray dogs can’t multiply and lost dogs are more often returned home.

This reduction in supply of homeless dogs has coupled with an increased demand for pups, Leiher said.

“Dog ownership is trending,” she noted. 

Good numbers on dog populations are hard to find — comparatively few people register their dogs with their cities and pay the accompanying fee, Leiher said, so while those figures are steadily climbing in cities such as Toronto, they only represent a fraction of the actual population. 

Nor does the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, which is tasked with regulating the importation of animals into Canada, track the number of dogs brought into the country, it said.

But research conducted by Kynetic on behalf of the Canadian Animal Health Institute suggests that in 2018, there were 8.2 million pet dogs in Canada — up from 7.6 million two years earlier. And for the first time since the industry association began conducting the research, the number of dogs was nearly on par with cats.

Leiher said she’s seen the number of rescue agencies bringing dogs from far afield climb in recent years.

In fact, she said, Toronto Animal Services has partnered with some of those organizations, transferring dogs over to them to be adopted out instead of keeping them in city kennels.

Last year, 273 dogs were adopted out and 221 were transferred to another dog rescue.

The independent agencies present some benefits over traditional shelters, Leiher said — they can be cared for by individuals in their homes, and the charities are generally very good at marketing.

At Save Our Scruff, each dog has an online profile that reads something like a dating profile — equal parts enticing and informative.

For instance, meet Nutri: a two-year-old rat terrier mix from Mexico who’s looking for his happily ever after. 

“Do you like fairy tales? Nutri is ready to be your prince charming,” it reads. “When he doesn’t have the zoomies, you can find him dozing like sleeping beauty.”

But social media is what really grabs potential adopters’ attention, Bye said. If people follow their Instagram or Facebook pages, the images of adorable dogs in need of homes are delivered straight to them — they don’t need to seek the information out.

It also works for attracting volunteers, she said, noting her organization is 98 per cent volunteer-run.

For instance, Bye said many of the dogs are flown in with vacationers signing up as “flight parents” ahead of their trips to certain countries.

Save Our Scruff — with its partners abroad — will arrange the rest: the dog’s transportation to the airport in its home country and from the airport in Toronto, along with a foster family for the animal to stay with in Canada.

“That’s where the dogs thrive,” said Bye. “It sets them up for a life that they can expect long-term, and gives them a chance to show us the kind of dogs that they’re going to be long-term.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2019.

Nicole Thompson, The Canadian Press

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