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Agriculture

Canopy Growth’s Bruce Linton stepping down as co-CEO and board member

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TORONTO — Canopy Growth Corp. announced Wednesday that Bruce Linton is stepping down as co-chief executive and as a board member, effective immediately.

The cannabis company said Mark Zekulin will become the sole CEO and will work with the board to begin a search to find a new leader to guide the company in its next phase.

Linton, who also stepped down as chairman and a director of Canopy Rivers Inc., has been the public face of the company as it has grown into a leader in the cannabis industry.

“Creating Canopy Growth began with an abandoned chocolate factory and a vision,” Linton said in a statement. “The board decided today, and I agreed, my turn is over.”

Linton noted that he had “full confidence in the team at Canopy.”

Zekulin said Canopy will never be the same without Linton.

“I personally remain committed to a successful transition over the coming year as we begin a process to identify new leadership that will drive our collective vision forward,” he said. 

“I know the company will continue to thrive as the Canopy story continues on for years to come.”

As part of the change, Rade Kovacevic, who has been leading the company’s Canadian operations and recreational strategy, was named president.

The board also appointed John Bell to replace Linton as chairman. Bell has served on the board as lead director for five years.

Canopy was founded in 2013 and recently received a $5 billion investment from Constellation Brands, the massive alcohol company.

Constellation Brands said last week that it was “not pleased” with Canopy’s recent year-end results as it recorded a loss in its own financial first quarter in connection with its stake in the Canadian cannabis company.

Canopy reported a wider-than-expected fourth-quarter net loss attributable to shareholders of $335.6 million or 98 cents per share, despite a jump in net revenue to $94.1 million that beat market estimates.

In reporting the results, Linton said Canopy invested heavily during the quarter for longer-term growth, such as boosting its production capacity and preparing for the launch of edibles and other next-generation pot products once legal later this year.

 

 

 

Companies in this story: (TSX:WEED, TSXV:RIV)

 

The Canadian Press

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Agri-Culture

Kraay Family Farm Celebrates 20 Years of Farmtastic Fun

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July 17, 2019 | Lacombe, AB –

from Kraay Family Farm

Kraay Family Farm is proud to celebrate 20 years of growing memories – your memories and ours!

The Kraay Family Farm is excited to announce that in honour of a milestone two decades of operation, the 2019 corn maze design honours and celebrates 20 years of family-friendly farm fun. The maze covers 15 acres of land and incorporates the Kraay Family Farm 20-year logo.

“We often get questions about why there is a crow in our logo. Our family is Dutch in origin and the name ‘Kraay’ actually means ‘Crow’ in Dutch. That, and there are a lot of crows around here!” explains Rachel Kraay. Rachel and Reuben Kraay own the farm together with Reuben’s parents, Ed and Linda Kraay.

“We are so grateful for the many guests who have encouraged, supported and had fun with us over these last 20 years! To own and operate a business where we get to watch our kids and our community’s kids grow up and to be part of families enjoying time together is amazing and truly a blessing for us,” says Rachel Kraay, one of the owners of the Kraay Family Farm.

Ed and Linda started the farm as a means to supplement the income from their small hog farm. Reuben was traveling after high school and visited a similar type of farm with a corn maze and other agritainment attractions and suggested the idea to his parents. “Ed and Linda like to have fun and try new things so, together with friends of theirs, they started the farm on a whim one year with just a corn maze, a slide, and a few picnic tables and fire pits,” continues Kraay, “The farm has just grown from there! Reuben and I joined his parents in 2005 after our first child was born and we’ve been adding to the farm ever since!”

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Agriculture

Scrapie, a disease related to mad cow, found in two flocks of sheep in Alberta

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Scrapie disease in Central Alberta

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says some sheep in Alberta have been infected with scrapie, a fatal disease that affects the animals’ nervous system.

The federal agency’s website says classic scrapie, which can be transmitted to other sheep and goats, was confirmed last month in two Alberta flocks.

Scrapie belongs to the family of diseases that includes mad cow disease in cattle, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.

Health Canada says there is no known link between scrapie and human health.

The CFIA says scrapie can only been seen in adult sheep between two and five years of age and can take years to develop.

Once an animal appears ill it typically dies within a few months.

The Canadian Press

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