Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

National

McClintic back in prison after time in healing lodge, Tori Stafford’s father says

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • A convicted child killer who became the subject of national outrage when it was learned she’d been transferred to an Indigenous healing lodge is back in prison, the father of her young victim said Thursday.

    Rodney Stafford issued a brief, celebratory Facebook post announcing that Terri-Lynne McClintic, who pleaded guilty in the brutal death of his eight-year-old daughter Tori, was no longer at the Saskatchewan lodge run by Corrections Canada.

    “It’s official!!! Terri-Lynne is back behind bars,” he wrote in the online post.

    Stafford later told a Toronto media outlet that McClintic had been relocated to a prison in Edmonton overnight, noting that Corrections Canada officials told him of the move Thursday morning.

    McClintic became a figure of national infamy after details emerged about Tori’s 2009 slaying.

    The girl from Woodstock, Ont., who was missing for three months before her body was found, had been abducted, repeatedly raped, and ultimately bludgeoned to death with a hammer.

    McClintic, 18 at the time of the killing,  pleaded guilty in 2010 and offered testimony that helped convict her then boyfriend, Michael Rafferty. In separate proceedings, McClintic and Rafferty were both sentenced to life in prison without any chance of parole for 25 years.

    Stafford learned, however, that eight years into her sentence, McClintic was quietly relocated to the healing lodge, a facility touted as a path to rehabilitation for Indigenous offenders. The remote, rural lodge is listed as a medium-security institution for women.

    Stafford, who has emerged as a child safety advocate in the years since his daughter’s death, found himself at the centre of a charged political controversy when word of McClintic’s transfer emerged.

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government came under fierce criticism for both the initial transfer and the fact that no move was immediately made to reverse it.

    The government said it would review the transfer decision, and the Conservative opposition repeatedly raised the issue, calling on the Liberals to place McClintic back in prison.

    On Wednesday, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale announced more stringent measures governing transfers to healing lodges, adding that the new approach would be applied in both past and future cases.

    Trudeau said on Thursday that the new rules will increase accountability.

    “These changes will help ensure guilty parties are held accountable while fostering rehabilitation so we can have fewer repeat offenders, fewer victims, and ultimately safer communities,” he said during Question Period, adding that the government had heard the anguish expressed by Tori’s family.

    In an interview with Toronto television station CP24, Stafford gave Ottawa some credit for sending McClintic back to a traditional prison.

    “I see the reaction from the federal government as being a positive one because the steps have been made to put her back to where she had to go and where she belongs,” he said.

    Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, however, said that the government was doing little more than bowing to public pressure.

    “The Liberals have finally backed down and taken action,” Scheer said during a policy announcement in Brampton, Ont. “But we can never forget that they only made this decision after being forced to.”

    The new rules announced by Goodale specify that prisoners won’t be eligible for transfers to healing lodges without secured perimeters until they’re into the “preparation for release” phases of their sentences. In McClintic’s case, she would not be eligible for such a move until she nears the end of the 25 years she must serve before being eligible for parole.

    The Correctional Service of Canada will also have to consider inmates’ behaviour and how close they are to being eligible for unescorted temporary absences from prison before transferring them.

    In addition, the deputy commissioner for women will be involved in decisions to ensure national standards are applied consistently and relevant factors are considered.

    Goodale said healing lodges still have a role to play in the correctional system but acknowledged a need for more public education in how prisoner decisions get made.

    “These are decisions that are not taken lightly or capriciously,” he said. “They are based on evidence and sound principles, and there needs to be a higher level of understanding of that.”

    In addition, there must be more meaningful and useful communication with victims given the anguish they have suffered, he said.

    “They need to know that their perspective is being properly respected.”

    Michelle McQuigge , The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!

    National

    Feds poised to bolster RCMP accountability

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — The federal government is poised to try to improve RCMP accountability by placing some external eyes on the national police force.

    Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki are expected to announce the plans at a news conference in Ottawa on Wednesday.

    The long-anticipated move is the latest attempt at rebuilding the force following years of sagging morale over internal bullying and harassment.

    Insiders say the measures to be announced Wednesday are the beginning of a process that involves several steps to ensure the force benefits from independent advice and scrutiny.

    The announcement will represent the Liberal government’s response to two critical 2017 reports.

    In the first, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP said the force lacked both the will and the capacity to address the challenges that afflict its workplaces.

    The commission urged the government to usher in civilian governance or oversight for the paramilitary-style police force.

    The second report, a review by former auditor general Sheila Fraser of four harassment lawsuits from female members, also called for substantial reforms.

    At the time, Goodale said both reports described “similar serious and long-standing concerns” and would “inform further action” to ensure that the RCMP is a healthy and respectful employer.

    Lucki became the RCMP’s first permanent female boss last year when she took over the commissioner’s post from Bob Paulson.

    Before he left, Paulson delivered an apology to hundreds of current and former female officers and employees who were subjected to discrimination and harassment dating back as far as four decades.

    The words of regret came as the Mounties settled class-action lawsuits stemming from allegations that cast a dark pall over the force.

    The Trudeau government has directed Lucki to modernize and reform the RCMP’s culture, protect employees from harassment and workplace violence, and foster reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

    Goodale’s mandate letter to Lucki, issued last year, also asked her to make the force representative of Canada’s diverse population by embracing gender parity and ensuring that women, Indigenous members and minority groups are better reflected in positions of leadership.

    Another priority is implementing measures to improve health and wellness after an auditor’s report found the force was failing to meet the mental-health needs of its members due to a lack of resources, poor monitoring and meagre support from supervisors.

    Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    National

    Google wants court to decide whether search curbs would infringe charter rights

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — Google wants the Federal Court to decide whether limiting search-engine results in the name of privacy would infringe Canadians’ constitutional guarantee of free expression.

    The leading internet search engine advocates broadening an upcoming court hearing to squarely address the question.

    Privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien has asked the Federal Court to clarify if Google’s popular search tool is covered by the law governing how companies handle personal information.

    A man who says a Google search reveals outdated and highly personal information about him will be the test case that helps a judge decide whether the search engine must remove the links from its results.

    Therrien argues the federal law on private-sector use of personal information includes such a right to de-indexing.

    In documents filed with the court, Google says the privacy commissioner’s reference application is illogical and inefficient because it is too narrow and therefore won’t fully explore the relevant constitutional questions.

    The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    january, 2019

    mon14jan - 31jan 1410:00 amjan 31Kindergarten Registration Begins at Red Deer Public SchoolsRegister your child for Kindergarten10:00 am - 3:00 pm (31)

    wed16jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    wed16jan7:00 pm- 9:00 pmPerfectionism or Healthy Striving? An Emotional Intelligence WorkshopAre you curious? 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

    thu17jan - 26jan 177:30 pmjan 26Ignition Theatre Presents: GRUESOME PLAYGROUND INJURIESPulitzer prize finalist Rajiv Joseph’s Gruesome Playground Injuries7:30 pm - 11:00 pm (26)

    sat19jan10:00 am- 5:00 pm2019 Healthy Living ExpoHelping Albertans live healthy, sustainable lives10:00 am - 5:00 pm

    sat19jan11:00 am- 2:00 pmCentral Alberta Refugee Effort and Catholic Social Services Annual Client and Volunteer Partyshare culture through food and music11:00 am - 2:00 pm

    sat19jan1:00 pm- 4:00 pmMAGSaturday @ the MuseumMAGnificent Saturdays welcomes all ages and abilities to participate in a fun art project every week! 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

    wed23jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    sat26jan9:00 am- 5:00 pmChildhood Anxiety: Understanding & Helping Children Heal Workshop9:00 am - 5:00 pm

    sat26jan1:00 pm- 4:00 pmMAGSaturday @ the MuseumMAGnificent Saturdays welcomes all ages and abilities to participate in a fun art project every week! 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

    sat26jan8:00 pm- 10:30 pmRobbie Burns Night8:00 pm - 10:30 pm

    mon28jan11:30 am- 1:30 pmLending Cupboard Presents Jann Arden in 1st annual Winter LuncheonJann Arden \"Winter Luncheon\"11:30 am - 1:30 pm

    tue29jan5:00 pm- 7:00 pmRed Deer and District Chamber of Commerce presents: January Business After Hoursnetworking event 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

    tue29jan7:00 pm- 11:30 pmLive Country Music @ Bo's Bar and GrillAaron Pritchett w/ Guest Kira Isabella and David James7:00 pm - 11:30 pm

    tue29jan7:00 pm- 12:00 amPaul BrandtThe Journey Tour 20197:00 pm - 12:00 am

    wed30jan12:30 pm- 1:00 pmBusiness Professionals Video Lecture LunchThis course explains high-level business concepts in simple ways. 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

    Trending

    X