Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

Keep your eyes on the road – delayed ‘spring’ highway cleanup takes place this Saturday

Published

1 minute read

Volunteers cleaning up Alberta highways

September 16, 2020

The annual highway cleanup, which usually occurs in the spring but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, will take place on Saturday, Sept. 19.

Between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Sept. 19, volunteers wearing bright orange safety vests will be collecting trash along Alberta highways to raise funds for community organizations.

Motorists are advised to watch for the volunteers, slow down, obey signs and use caution when passing cleanup crews.

The organizations, which include 4-H clubs, Scouts, Girl Guides, schools, church organizations and other non-profit groups, earn $100 per kilometre cleaned.

Quick facts

  • Volunteers must be nine years old or older to participate.
  • They must take part in a safety training program and be under adult supervision.
  • Last year, the Alberta government contributed about $1.28 million to 740 volunteer organizations involved in the highway cleanup.
  • More than 18,000 volunteers collected more than 56,000 bags of garbage while cleaning up more than 13,700 kilometres of Alberta roads.

Todayville is an independently-owned digital media company. We specialize in helping community groups, local businesses and organizations tell their story. Our team has years of media and video production experience. Talk to us about advertising, brand journalism stories, opinion pieces, event promotion, or other ideas you have to make our product better. We also own and operate Todayville Red Deer and Todayville Calgary.

Follow Author

Alberta

‘Bona fide police service:’ Alberta expanding power, status for First Nations police

Published on

EDMONTON — The Alberta government has introduced proposed changes to the province’s Police Act which would expand the powers of First Nations police forces.

The changes are part of a number of proposed amendments under the Justices Statutes Amendment Act, Justice Minister Kaycee Madu said Wednesday.

First Nations police forces have been in place in Alberta for up to two decades, Madu said, but they haven’t received the credit they deserve for the work they’ve done in Indigenous communities.  

“They can be much more sensitive to local issues and cultures,” Madu said. 

Although First Nations police are recognized through an exemption in the current act, the amendment would give them the same status as city forces in Edmonton, Calgary, Medicine Hat and Lethbridge.

“One of the ways by which this is significant for First Nations policing is by acknowledging that they are a bona fide police service within the framework of policing in our province,” Madu said.  

“There is no question that this amendment would increase the stature of First Nations police services and commissions within the framework of policing in our province. It would put them on the same level with municipal police services.”   

Madu said First Nations police officers would be able to issue tickets for infractions on their reserves.

“There has been some difficulty with First Nation police services being able to enforce their bylaws. With this amendment, they would be able to issue a ticket and go to the courts to enforce them,” he said.  

“It is one problem we have heard time and time again from our First Nations people.” 

The proposed legislation would also give First Nations police chiefs a spot at the discussion table about changes to policing in the province. 

There are currently three First Nations forces in Alberta: the Blood Tribe Police Service in southern Alberta, the Lakeshore Regional Police Service northwest of Edmonton and the Tsuut’ina Nation Police Service just outside Calgary. 

“The Tsuut’ina Nation Police Service has operated since 2004 and meets all provincial policing standards and duties. I commend the minister and his government colleagues for fully recognizing the Tsuut’ina and all First Nation police agencies in the amended Police Act,” Chief Roy Whitney Onespot said in a statement.  

Other changes would allow the courts to send juror summonses electronically, including by email, and eliminate a summons form.  

They would also expand the list of offences subject to civil forfeiture under the Victims Restitution and Compensation Payments Act.

“This change will further deter crime as well as provide a source of new money, which will support police training and fund community crime prevention organizations and victims of crime initiatives,” said Madu.

— By Bill Graveland in Calgary

This report by The Canadian Press was first published October 21, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Advisers suggest Alberta students not learn about residential schools before Grade 4

Published on

EDMONTON — The chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission says young children aren’t too emotionally vulnerable to learn about residential schools as a leaked draft of proposed Alberta curriculum changes suggests. 

Senator Murray Sinclair says survivors have shared their stories with young children and there’s no evidence it was damaging.

A draft of proposed Alberta curriculum changes obtained by CBC News suggests that children younger than Grade 4 are too emotionally vulnerable to learn about residential schools.

In documents posted on CBC’s website, the government is advised to save that topic for older children and that Grade 9 students could potentially learn about residential schools as one example of “harsh schooling” in the past. 

While Canadian residential schools are described as “traumatic material,” the draft for the kindergarten to Grade 4 curriculum recommends students be taught about ancient Rome, battles of the Middle Ages and slavery in the Ottoman Empire. 

The commission’s report in 2015 called on ministers of education to include the history and legacy of residential schools in kindergarten to Grade 12 curriculums.

It described the Canadian government’s long-running policy of removing Indigenous children from their communities as cultural genocide.

Sinclair, during an online conversation Wednesday with the Assembly of Manitoba chiefs, said the most important part of the residential schools story is their impact on younger children.

It’s clear a curriculum could be developed and taught to young children without causing any emotional damage, said Sinclair, who added that many attended Truth and Reconciliation Commission events. 

“There is no situation that has ever occurred that I’m aware of that there has been a complaint that the children are negatively impacted or damaged by the experience.”

The authors of the proposed curriculum changes also advise that the concept of equity not be taught because it is “ideologically loaded.”

Alberta Indigenous Relations Minister Rick Wilson dismissed criticism from the Opposition NDP about the curriculum proposals as fearmongering.

“These are merely recommendations that will go to the curriculum working group of teachers later this fall,” he wrote on Twitter.

“At face value, some of these recommendations just aren’t realistic — especially for the ages suggested. Again, they’re recommendations. These documents are not the curriculum.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 21, 2020.

— By Lauren Krugel in Calgary. With files from Kelly Geraldine Malone in Winnipeg

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

october, 2020

No Events

Trending

X