Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

National

Erin Weir to seek NDP nomination despite ousting over harassment complaints

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • SURREY, B.C. — Member of Parliament Erin Weir says he’ll seek the NDP nomination in his riding again despite being removed from the party’s caucus after an investigation upheld harassment complaints.

    NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has stood firm in his decision to block Weir from returning to caucus or running in the 2019 election, but the Regina-Lewvan MP says local New Democrats should decide the nominee.

    Weir said he’s knocked on thousands of doors in the riding and has “overwhelming support.” 

    “The real question is what does Mr. Singh intend to do? Will he simply ignore the more than 2,000 NDP members in Regina-Lewvan and appoint his own candidate?” Weir asked.

    He added that if he lost the nomination vote, he would respect the outcome, but if Singh simply appoints a candidate without a democratic vote, then he would have to consult local members about the way forward.

    Further, Weir said a “significant” number of NDP members of Parliament want to see him return to caucus, but they cannot speak out publicly because they are subject to Singh’s discipline.

    “There are lots of people in the caucus that want me to be part of it. It’s Mr. Singh who’s said he doesn’t want me to be a part of it,” he said.

    Weir was suspended from the caucus in February after fellow New Democrat Christine Moore sent an email to her caucus colleagues saying she had heard numerous complaints about Weir allegedly harassing staffers.

    A subsequent independent investigation upheld several complaints of harassment, which Singh described at the time as a failure to read non-verbal cues in social settings.

    However, it was Weir’s response to the findings — publicly dismissing one complaint as payback for a policy dispute he had with a member of former leader Tom Mulcair’s staff — that got him booted out of caucus permanently in May.

    Several female NDP activists applauded Singh’s decision in a letter posted online this week, countering a letter criticizing the move from 67 former New Democrat politicians in Saskatchewan.

    Singh was in Surrey, B.C., this week for a NDP caucus retreat and said Tuesday he wasn’t going to change his mind because people in a “position of privilege” want to intimidate him.

    Weir said it was disappointing that Singh dismissed dozens of long-serving NDP members of Parliament and the Saskatchewan legislature as privileged rather than addressing their concerns about a lack of due process.

    At the end of the retreat Thursday, Singh said he would not consider apologizing to the politicians, though he noted they do “important work” for their communities.

    “Using a position of privilege to do good work for the community is great, but to use that same position to try to have a change in position when it comes to harassment is not going to happen,” he said.

    He also described the investigation into Weir’s conduct as a “fair process” and denied he had made any mistakes in handling complaints against the MP.

    The party leader said he’s made it clear he won’t readmit Weir to caucus, though if he tries to seek the NDP nomination a vetting process will take place during which he will have “due process.”

    “He can run as an Independent. That’s up to him,” Singh added.

    The caucus retreat came at a difficult time in Singh’s tenure as party loyalists grumble about poor fundraising results and question his effectiveness as leader.

    During a closing news conference with his caucus gathered behind him, Singh said there had been tough discussions but they emerged united in their determination to “make people’s lives better.”

    “Sitting down around the table and sharing those stories and talking about the people that are depending on us … really brings us together as New Democrats to say, ‘Listen, we’ve got an important job to do.’ “

    Weir said he’s completed sensitivity training to better respond to non-verbal cues and has reflected on how to have frank political debates in ways that won’t make people feel intimidated or embarrassed.

    The investigation report has never been released, but Weir posted a letter from the sensitivity trainer on his website that he says summarizes the findings. The sexual harassment complaints involved Weir’s habit of standing too close and inserting himself into conversations with others, the letter says.

    Weir said he feels a tremendous obligation to the hundreds of people who worked hard in Saskatchewan to regain some federal NDP seats after the party was shut out of the province for a decade.

    He added he’s eager to return to Parliament next week and speak up for the people of his riding.

    “I’ve been active in the NDP since I was 15 and feel a deep affinity to the movement,” he said. “I never thought I’d be in this situation. It’s been a difficult process to navigate, but I try to be focused on the task ahead.”

    — With files from Janice Dickson in Ottawa

    Laura Kane, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!

    National

    Freeland says Khashoggi case not closed; but Trump says facts may never be known

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — Canada will use the upcoming G20 summit to push for answers in the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says.

    Freeland said Tuesday Canada considers his murder to be very much an open case, a contrast to a statement by U.S. President Donald Trump that the facts surrounding Khashoggi’s death might just never be known.

    “Canada very much does not consider the Khashoggi affair to be closed,” Freeland said, hours after Trump released a statement that attempted to bring the controversy to a close for the U.S.

    Freeland said she expects the Khashoggi case to be an issue during the talks among leaders of the world’s 20 top economies in early December in Argentina, and says Canada will persist with its push for a transparent international investigation.

    “It is very clearly Canada’s position that those responsible for this horrendous murder must face full responsibility for it,” she said.

    “We certainly imagine that the Khashoggi murder will be an issue, which we discuss with many of the partners who we will be meeting with.”

    The kingdom is a member of the G20, and the Saudi-owned television station Al-Arabiya says Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the country’s de facto leader, will attend the summit.

    U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that bin Salman ordered the Oct. 2 killing of Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.

    “Our intelligence agencies continue to assess all information, but it could very well be that the Crown Prince had knowledge of this tragic event — maybe he did and maybe he didn’t!” Trump said in a written statement.

    “That being said, we may never know all of the facts surrounding the murder of Mr. Jamal Khashoggi.”

    Regardless, Saudi Arabia remains a “steadfast” partner of the U.S. and has helped keep oil prices stable, Trump said. He also said he doesn’t want to jeopardize US$450 billion in Saudi investment in the U.S., including $110 billion to buy American-made military hardware.

    Trump said the U.S. has already sanctioned 17 Saudi individuals under its Magnitsky Act, and isn’t planning any further action.

    Freeland, meanwhile, has said Canada is contemplating similar sanctions, but she gave no indication why that has yet to happen or what is taking so long.

    A senior government official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the deliberations, said any decision on sanctions will be made by federal cabinet, and will be part of a larger process that will see Canada working in co-ordination with its allies.

    The process includes a consideration of sanctions, a co-ordinated push for an international investigation and an assessment of the Turkish recording of Khashoggi’s death, the official said.

    Freeland has not heard the recording, but has been briefed on its contents by the head of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, who travelled to Turkey to hear it, said the official.

    Mike Blanchfield, The Canadian Press



    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    National

    Ride-hailing group says B.C. model looks a lot like expanded taxi industry

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • VANCOUVER — A coalition of businesses and interest groups advocating for ride-hailing in British Columbia says legislation introduced yesterday will just create an expanded taxi industry, not the ride-hailing services that customers expect.

    Ian Tostenson of Ridesharing Now for BC says members are “bewildered” that the future of ride-hailing in the province remains uncertain and the government hasn’t committed to a start date for the service.

    Tostenson, who also represents the BC Restaurant and Food Services Association, says the coalition is especially concerned that the Passenger Transportation Board would have power to limit the number of drivers on the road, where they can drive, and also set rates.

    He says the organization was expecting to see legislation that more closely matched the customer-driven supply and demand model that exists in other jurisdictions.

    Tim Burr of ride-hailing company Lyft says the company sees legislation introduced Monday as a “procedural step forward” but the regulation and rule-making process will come next.

    He says the company is used to rolling up its sleeves to work with legislators and regulators in many jurisdictions and remains committed to working with the B.C. government to bring the service to the province.

    The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    november, 2018

    thu11oct - 29novoct 115:45 pmnov 29Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) - CMHA(october 11) 5:45 pm - (november 29) 8:15 pm

    wed21nov5:30 pm- 11:00 pmFestival of Trees Preview Dinner5:30 pm - 11:00 pm

    thu22nov11:30 am- 1:30 pmFestival of Trees Business LunchFestival of Trees11:30 am - 1:30 pm

    thu22nov6:00 pm- 9:00 pmFestival of Trees Taste of Red DeerFestival of Trees6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

    fri23nov10:30 am- 1:30 pmFestival of Trees Fashion BrunchFashion Brunch10:30 am - 1:30 pm

    sat24nov10:00 am- 4:00 pmParkland Garden Centre Craft and Market Sale10:00 am - 4:00 pm

    sat24nov6:00 pm- 11:00 pmMistletoe MagicFestival of Trees6:00 pm - 11:00 pm

    sun25nov9:00 am- 12:00 pmBreakfast with SantaFestival of Trees9:00 am - 12:00 pm

    fri30nov - 1decnov 303:00 pmdec 1- 4:00 pmWesterner Park Christmas Artisan Market3:00 pm - (december 1) 4:00 pm

    Trending

    X