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COVID-19

The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Sept. 24

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The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 10:41 a.m. EDT on Sept. 24, 2020:

There are 148,162 confirmed cases in Canada.

_ Quebec: 69,088 confirmed (including 5,809 deaths, 59,686 resolved)

_ Ontario: 48,496 confirmed (including 2,836 deaths, 41,886 resolved)

_ Alberta: 17,032 confirmed (including 260 deaths, 15,252 resolved)

_ British Columbia: 8,395 confirmed (including 227 deaths, 6,769 resolved)

_ Saskatchewan: 1,830 confirmed (including 24 deaths, 1,673 resolved)

_ Manitoba: 1,674 confirmed (including 18 deaths, 1,238 resolved)

_ Nova Scotia: 1,087 confirmed (including 65 deaths, 1,021 resolved)

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 272 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 267 resolved)

_ New Brunswick: 197 confirmed (including 2 deaths, 191 resolved)

_ Prince Edward Island: 58 confirmed (including 57 resolved)

_ Yukon: 15 confirmed (including 15 resolved)

_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed (including 13 resolved)

_ Northwest Territories: 5 confirmed (including 5 resolved)

_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases

_ Total: 148,162 (0 presumptive, 148,162 confirmed including 9,244 deaths, 128,073 resolved)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020.

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Alberta

Alberta COVID deaths pushes Canada past milestone of 10,000 deaths

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Canada reached a grim and worrying milestone Tuesday in the COVID-19 pandemic, surpassing 10,000 novel coronavirus deaths.

Alberta reported two deaths from COVID-19 to lift the national tally to 10,001.

COVID-19 case counts slowed across the country through the summer but have taken a big jump in many areas this fall, with new daily highs regularly being set through Central and Western Canada.

Canada crossed the threshold of 5,000 deaths on May 12, a little over two months after the first one was reported.

Winnipeg epidemiologist Cynthia Carr said she’s worried about the rapid spread of COVID-19 in recent weeks.

She said Manitoba reported 13 deaths between Oct. 20 to 26, compared with 13 people who died in 21 weeks from the start of the pandemic last spring.

“Almost one in 20 people that are infected with COVID-19 in our country passed away,” Carr said in an interview. “It’s not a milestone we want to achieve, and my worry is the speed at which things are changing.”

Health Canada recently forecast 10,100 COVID-19 deaths in Canada by Nov. 1 as a worst-case scenario and now that number is close, she said.

Carr said the increased spread of COVID-19 will result in more opportunities for the virus to infect the elderly and other vulnerable people.

“The more that there is community-based spread, the fewer the options are for targeted approaches and restrictions without going back to a total shutdown,” she said.

But Carr said she doesn’t believe imposing further lockdowns on peoples economic and social well-being are the answer.

“We’re sabotaging those businesses and people that are paying the price because they are the ones that have been targeted as part of the solution to stop the spread.,” she said.

It’s up to people to fight COVID-19 by reducing their interactions and practising physical distancing, she said.

“The pathway back is for us to do the right thing and do our own continued lockdowns,” said Carr.

Quebec and Ontario lead the country in COVID-19 deaths, with 6,172 in Quebec and 3,103 in Ontario.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau admitted today that the COVID-19 pandemic “really sucks” but added that a vaccine is coming.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 27, 2020.

Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press

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Community

A conversation about Dignity in a Pandemic: Podcast

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October 21, 2020

Edmonton-AB-On Global Dignity Day, the John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights launches a larger conversation about dignity in collaboration with the community in a new podcast titled, Dignity In a Pandemic.

The podcast theme is ‘no one left behind’. The discussions explore what dignity looks like for vulnerable members in our community and how it has been affected by the pandemic. Our team began gathering stories in March when the pandemic began to take hold of the world. Our first episode features Shima Aisha Robinson, a poet, community organizer, and activist. We talk about Camp Pekiwewin, which is led by Indigenous 2 Spirit women working in solidarity with Black and 2SLGBTQ communities.

Renee Vaugeois, Executive Director of John Humphrey Centre of Peace and Human Rights, adds, “I’m excited for others to hear the new podcast. The episodes uplift local voices with lived experience and name injustices we see during Covid-19 for a call to action. These are real people with tough realities, who imagine futures where human rights are upheld.”

#YEGdignity was first created by members of our Youth Action Project in 2015 where art was used to challenge perceptions of poverty. The campaign launched that year with the public painting of four murals looking at dignity and poverty. Five years later, the project has expanded to include a podcast to give voice to the vulnerable.

Each week over the next three months, JHC will share new episodes told with diverse Edmontonians. This effort is part of JHC’s commitment to building a Human Rights City, where all participate, belong and are included.

Click here to listen to the first in the series of podcasts.

The ​John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights works to advance a culture of peace and human rights through education and community building guided by the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Read more on Todayville.

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