Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"] [the_ad id="89560"]

Agriculture

Watch: Viral video produced in Red Deer a finalist in 4 categories at Alberta’s top film awards!

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • It just might be a breakthrough year for Nick Saik and Know Ideas Media.   Last summer Nick produced a short film called “Nut Milking Exposed” for his production company Know Ideas Media.   The short film was entertaining… VERY entertaining.  Nick set out to make a point that maybe certain liquids referred to as “milk” shouldn’t really be called milk.  But the script, the actor, the editing.. it was all so well done that the little video became a major viral success.

    So far “Nut Milking Exposed” has been seen over 35 million times!  That’s right 35,000,000 and counting!

    When Nick saw that viewers loved it, he entered “Nut Milking Exposed” in the 2019 Rosie Awards.  The Rosies are an annual award presentation by The Alberta Media Production Industries Association (AMPIA).  They are the top awards for the Alberta film making industry.  Nick entered four categories and is a finalist in every one of them!

    Here are the categories where Nick went 4 for 4 as a finalist!The Rosies will be held on Saturday, April 27, 2019 at Edmonton’s Shaw Conference Centre (9797 Jasper Ave).

    BEST DRAMATIC SHORT

    A Memento of Life – Bonita Schoenleber, Producers – VonitaVon Pictures

    Aeternitas – Gordie Haakstad & Chris Beauchamp, Producers, The Distillery Film Company

    Nut Milking: Exposed – Nick Saik & Tyler Duffy, Producers, Know Ideas Media

    Rivals – Derek Heisler, Producers, – H Studios

    Sunday Morning, Coming Down- Christina Beamish, Chase Gardiner & Chevi Rabbit, Producers – Revolutionary Waltzes / CGCinematography / Telus StoryHive

    The Suburbanight – Eva Colmers & Susie Moloney, Producers – No Problem Productions

     

    BEST DIRECTOR  (DRAMA UNDER 30 MINUTES)

    Derek Heisler – Rivals – H Studios

    Gordie Haakstad – Aeternitas – The Distillery Film Company

    John Cameron – Direct Energy – “New Moms” – META Productions

    Justin Kueber – Black and Blue – Guerrilla Motion Pictures

    Nick Saik –  Nut Milking: Exposed. – Know Ideas Media

    Reamonn Joshee – A Memento of Life – VonitaVon Pictures

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ALBERTA ACTOR

    Greg Lawson – Wynonna Earp – “I Fall to Pieces” – Seven24 Films

    Mark Meer – Necessary Evil – “Soul Purpose”  – Group of Rogues

    Samuel Duke – A Gentleman – DDG

    Shaun Johnston – Heartland – “A Place to Call Home” – Seven24 Films

    Sheldon Elter – Caution: May Contain Nuts – “Sexy Bigfoot Alien Chef” – Mosaic Entertainment

    Tyler Duffy – Nut Milking: Exposed – Know Ideas Media

     

    BEST EDITOR  (DRAMA UNDER 30 MINUTES)

    Carey Komadina & Sarah Taylor – Caution: May Contain Nuts – “Sexy Bigfoot Alien Chef’ – Mosaic Entertainment

    Nick Saik – Nut Milking: Exposed – Know Ideas Media

    Nina Staum – SGI – “A Knock at the Door” – Bamboo Shoots

    Sabir Alimzhan – Cruel – DDG

    Sarah Taylor – The Suburbanight – No Problem Productions

    Thomas Dudley – Vijitkul – “Golden Godess” – Leader Productions

     

    OK.. if you haven’t seen this video before you’re likely dying to see it now.  If you have it’s always worth another look and another laugh.   35 million views can’t be wrong!

    Todayville is proud to have partnered with Nick Saik and Know Ideas Media on a new platform focussed on agriculture.   Click here to see more of Nick’s work on Todayville Agriculture!

     


    If you like this, share it!

    Agriculture

    Feds plan to limit uses of ‘neonic’ pesticides, but outright ban still likely

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — Federal scientists are finalizing restrictions on a much-used class of pesticides to try to protect bees.

    The recommendations could be moot in less than a year, however, if the same agency upholds an existing decision to ban most uses of the same products to protect other types of insects.

    The Pest Management Regulatory Agency of Health Canada has spent the last seven years reviewing the approvals of nicotine-based pesticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are popular among farmers, backyard green-thumbs and lawn aficionados.

    The long review process was made even more complicated by the fact that the agency held separate reviews on the same products — one looking at the impact on pollinators such as bees and one for aquatic insects.

    While Health Canada found bees are only harmed by certain uses of the products, its concern about the rising concentrations in ground and surface water led it to decide last year that it needed to phase out most outdoor uses of the pesticides over the next three to five years.

    It won’t actually finalize that decision until January 2020 however, so for now the decision is to bar the products from being sprayed on some fruit crops, and limit the frequency with which they can be used on others, starting in 2021.

    The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Agriculture

    Feds’ plan for neonicotinoids makes little sense, environment groups say

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — Environment groups are calling out Canada’s approach to assessing pesticides after seven years of reviews led Health Canada to simultaneously decide to allow certain popular products to keep being used with restrictions, and to propose banning the same products from outdoor uses altogether.

    The Pest Management Regulatory Agency on Thursday released its final decision on what limits should be placed on a category of nicotine-based pesticides known as neonicotinoids to keep them from killing bees. Starting in two years, the pesticides won’t be allowed to be sprayed at all on certain crops like apples and tree nuts and there will be limited times when they can be sprayed on many others, like tomatoes, eggplants and berries.

    Products that have no alternatives are given an extra year before they are affected by the decision.

    The agency said the risks the products pose to bees in other applications, such as pre-treating seeds, are acceptable and only require new labels to warn of the dangers. Most of Canada’s canola and corn crop seeds are pre-treated with neonicotinoids, along with about half the country’s soybean seeds.

    However, this decision, which won’t begin to take effect until 2021, will likely be overridden in less than a year when the agency finalizes a separate assessment of the exact same products for their impact on aquatic insects. The agency found in 2016 that the most popular of the neonicotinoids was building up in ground and surface water and recommended banning it outright. It also launched a special assessment of the other two most common “neonics,” concluding in 2018 that they also needed to be banned.

    The very final decision on that won’t come until January 2020.

    “Right now this is strictly about the risk to pollinators and for this assessment not all uses pose an unacceptable risk to pollinators,” said Scott Kirby, the director general of the environmental-assessment division of the pest management agency.

    Lisa Gue, a senior researcher at the David Suzuki Foundation, said it is “disturbing” that the agency is continuing to allow neonicotinoids at all given that the agency’s scientists have concluded they cause unacceptable harm to any kinds of insects.

    “The decision-making process here is just incomprehensible and incoherent,” she said.

    Beatrice Olivastri, the executive director of Friends of the Earth Canada, said the agency’s fragmented approach to reviewing the products is “nonsensical.”

    Neonicotinoids are used by farmers and hobby gardeners alike to manage pests like aphids and spider mites. Scientists blame the chemicals for weakening bees, making them more susceptible to disease and bad weather.

    More than one-third of the world’s food crops require pollinators, like bees, for production.

    The European Union banned neonicotinoids at the end of last year after scientists concluded there was no safe way to use them without hurting bees. In 2017, a task force at the International Union for Conservation of Nature updated a compilation of more than 1,100 peer-reviewed research studies of neonicotinoids and concluded there was no doubt they harm bees.

    Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press



    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Trending

    X