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WHO chief: Focus on Ukraine shows bias against Black lives

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LONDON (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization has slammed the global community for its focus on the war in Ukraine, arguing that crises elsewhere, including in his home country of Ethiopia, are not being given equal consideration, possibly because those suffering are not white.

WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus questioned “if the world really gives equal attention to Black and white lives,” given that the ongoing emergencies in Ethiopia, Yemen, Afghanistan and Syria have garnered only a “fraction” of the global concern for Ukraine. He was speaking in a virtual press briefing from Geneva on Wednesday.

Last month, Tedros said there is ”nowhere on earth where the health of millions of people is more under threat” than Ethiopia’s Tigray region.

Since a truce was declared in Tigray three weeks ago, about 2,000 trucks should have been able to bring food, medicines and other essentials to the conflict-ridden area, he said. Instead, only about 20 trucks have arrived, said Tedros, a former minister of health in Ethiopia and an ethnic Tigrayan.

“As we speak, people are dying of starvation,” he said. “This is one of the longest and worst sieges by both Eritrean and Ethiopian forces in modern history.”

Tedros acknowledged that the war in Ukraine is globally significant, but asked if other crises are being accorded enough attention.

“I need to be blunt and honest that the world is not treating the human race the same way,” he said. “Some are more equal than others.”

Tedros described the situation in Tigray as “tragic” and said he “hopes the world comes back to its senses and treats all human life equally.” He also critiqued the press for its failure to document the ongoing atrocities in Ethiopia, noting that people had been burned alive in the region. “I don’t even know if that was taken seriously by the media.”

Earlier this year, the government of Ethiopia sent a letter to the World Health Organization, accusing Tedros of “misconduct” after his sharp criticism of the war and humanitarian crisis in the country.

The Ethiopian government said Tedros was using his office “to advance his political interest at the expense of Ethiopia” and said he continues to be an active member of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front; Tedros was Ethiopia’s foreign minister and health minister when the TPLF dominated the country’s ruling coalition.

Maria Cheng, The Associated Press

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Conservatives warn Canada is fuelling Putin’s war machine by returning turbines

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OTTAWA — Conservative MPs have accused the Liberal government of fuelling Vladimir Putin’s war machine by agreeing to allow pipeline equipment in Montreal for repairs to be returned to a Russian energy giant.

Tories claimed the government’s decision to return the turbine means more funds will be pumped into Gazprom, which is controlled by the Russian state, and in turn will allow the country’s president to buy more arms to attack Ukraine.

The accusations were made during heated exchanges on Thursday at a meeting of a parliamentary committee where Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly and Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson gave evidence about Canada’s decision to return the equipment.

Last month, the Liberal government drew criticism for granting Siemens Energy an exemption on sanctions against Russia and allowing the turbine to return to Germany and then eventually to Russia for installation in the pipeline.

Siemens Energy was granted a permit to import, repair and return up to six turbines for Gazprom. Kyiv has accused Canada of setting a dangerous precedent, arguing the exemptions undermine the sanctions.

Conservative MP James Bezan told the committee that Canada had been “outmanoeuvred by the Russian Federation.”

He said it seemed that Putin was playing chess while Canada was playing checkers, and accused the Liberal government of “enabling” Gazprom, which would give Russia more funds to buy weapons to kill Ukrainians.

“It’s embarrassing that the government of Canada capitulated,” he said.

Alexandra Chyczij, executive director of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, told the committee that the decision to return the turbines was “the thin edge of the wedge” and the first waiver of sanctions since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February.

She warned that “appeasement of dictators” never works and just “emboldens them.”

But Joly denied that Canada was capitulating and insisted it was rather calling Putin’s bluff. She said returning the turbine denied Putin a pretext for reducing the flow of natural gas through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline that runs to Germany from Russia.

Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson echoed this sentiment and said revealing Putin’s dishonesty had always been a reason for the decision.

But Tory MP Marty Morantz noted that the government didn’t use this language when the decision was first made. He questioned when it decided the rationale was about calling Putin’s bluff, rather than about securing gas supplies to Europe.

The Conservatives also questioned whether the alternative of funnelling gas through pipelines through Ukraine had been actively explored by the government.

Wilkinson said the option had been looked at in detail but was not seen as viable, not least because the Ukraine pipelines were through a war zone. He added that Canada was working closely with European nations to help wean them off their reliance on Russian energy to heat their homes, including by planning to supply natural gas from Canada.

Both Wilkinson and Joly said the decision was taken after wide consultations, including with Ukraine, and was a difficult one.

Wilkinson said the intention of sanctions imposed after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is to punish Putin and not to punish Canada’s allies in Europe.

Joly said the government was firmly committed to continuing sanctions to squeeze Putin and was planning new rounds every two weeks.

Russia has proven to the world that it cannot be a reliable economic partner, she said.

Ukraine’s ambassador to Canada, Yulia Kovaliv, was expected to make clear her country’s disappointment with the decision in an appearance before the committee later Thursday.

On Wednesday, Joly and German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock insisted at a joint appearance in Montreal that it was necessary to return the turbine.

Since the equipment arrived in Germany, Russia has reduced the pipeline’s flow to 20 per cent of capacity, which the ministers said shows Putin is using energy as a weapon of war.

The turbine remains in Germany, with Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov arguing that Gazprom needs documents from Siemens Energy proving that the equipment isn’t subject to western sanctions before it can be returned to Russia.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 4, 2022.

Marie Woolf, The Canadian Press

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Ukraine’s ambassador to tell MPs Canada must reverse Russian turbine decision

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OTTAWA — Ukraine’s ambassador to Canada will today make clear her country’s disappointment over Canada’s decision to allow pipeline equipment that was in Montreal for repairs to be returned to a state-controlled energy giant in Russia despite war-related sanctions.

Yulia Kovaliv is to appear before a committee of MPs looking into Ottawa’s decision to allow a turbine to be released to Gazprom, which Canada has sanctioned over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, for use in the Nord Stream 1 pipeline supplying Germany with natural gas.

Last month, the Liberal government drew criticism for granting Siemens Energy an exemption on sanctions against Russia and allowing the turbine to return to Germany and then eventually to Russia for installation in the pipeline.

Siemens Energy was granted a permit to import, repair and return up to six turbines for Gazprom and the Ukrainian Embassy says Kovaliv will renew calls for Ottawa to revoke the decision.

Kyiv has accused Canada of setting a dangerous precedent, arguing the exemptions undermine sanctions put on Russia in response to its invasion of Ukraine.

Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly and Natural Resources Minister Jonathan Wilkinson are also to appear before the House of Commons foreign affairs committee today, and Liberal chair Ali Ehsassi says it is important for Canadians to hear how the decision was made.

\On Wednesday, Joly and German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock both insisted the return of the turbines used in the Russian pipeline was necessary.

But they also said the fact that the turbine remains in Germany after Canada allowed its release — and that Russia has since reduced natural gas supplies to Germany to 20 per cent — reveals the level of dishonesty from President Vladimir Putin.

Russia had cited the delayed return of the equipment as a reason for reducing the flow of natural gas through the pipeline that runs to Germany from Russia.

“We called his bluff,” Joly said in Montreal on Wednesday in a joint news conference with Baerbock. “It is now clear that Putin is weaponizing energy flows to Europe.”

Ehsassi said Thursday’s meeting of the foreign affairs committee would help establish “the diplomatic representations that were made” around the decision.

Germany’s ambassador to Canada, Sabine Sparwasser, is also expected to appear before the committee, alongside the European Union’s ambassador to Canada, Melita Gabrič.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 4, 2022.

Marie Woolf, The Canadian Press

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