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Alberta

Walk To Breathe – Alberta man will walk from Lethbridge to Edmonton to raise $50,000.00

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Article submitted by Chris Sadleir on behalf of The Lung Association, Alberta and NWT

July 7, Edmonton’s Chris Sadleir will take the first step in a 500-kilometre, 50-thousand dollar journey, a walk from Lethbridge to Edmonton in support of people living with lung disease in Alberta and the Northwest Territories. Last year, Sadleir’s inaugural walk took him from Calgary to Edmonton, and raised over 33-thousand dollars. At the time, it was meant to be a once-in-a-lifetime effort, one that turned out to raise even more awareness and engagement than Sadleir had dared to hope for, and ultimately, uniting Albertans from small towns, rural regions, and big cities in support of the cause.

Building on last year’s success, Sadleir will not just take on the challenge again, he is extending his route, his reach, and his goal for results.

The journey will commence in Lethbridge on July 7th and finish in Edmonton July 23rd – five years to the day that Sadleir’s father received his life-saving lung transplant. This year’s walk is in celebration of that milestone, and in commemoration of a dear family member who lost his life to respiratory complications earlier this year.

PLEASE UNDERSTAND: Lung Disease does NOT target smokers and the elderly – it affects EVERYONE – babies, young children, young adults and otherwise healthy people.

From Chis Sadleir:

I HUMBLY ask for your support in my WALK TO BREATHE, and the fight against lung disease. Your kindness and consideration is a BREATH OF FRESH AIR, as we work together to make a difference across Alberta and NWT.”

“In 2020, I walked from Calgary to Edmonton and raised over $33,000 to support lung disease patients and increase awareness about the far-reaching affects of lung disease.

This year, my Walk To Breathe will take me from Lethbridge to Edmonton – over 500 km, with a goal to raise $50,000 for the Lung Association of AB & NWT.  

Having experienced the devastating affects of lung disease within my own family, I am passionate about supporting all those who struggle to breathe.  My Father is a 5-year Double Lung Transplant survivor, and a very dear member of our family lost his life due to respiratory complications in early March – they are the inspiration behind my walk this year.

My Walk To Breathe 2021 will begin in Lethbridge on July 7th and finish in Edmonton on July 23rd – marking the 5-year anniversary of my father’s transplant.

I HUMBLY ask for your support in my WALK TO BREATHE, and the fight against lung disease.

“The inspiration comes from my Father – my determination is for ALL Albertans”

This is a province-wide initiative, and we humbly ask for your support @ www.ab.lung.ca/walktobreathe

Your kindness and consideration is a BREATH OF FRESH AIR, as we work together to make a difference across Alberta and NWT.

Raised so far $22,890.00
Fundraising goal $50,000.00
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Alberta

Alberta's chief medical officer says most of 11 Omicron COVID cases were vaccinated

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EDMONTON — Alberta’s total number of Omicron variant COVID-19 cases remains at 11, but the province’s chief medical officer of health expects that number to grow.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw also says seven of the 11 people were fully vaccinated, two were partially vaccinated and two were unvaccinated.

Alberta Health is still gathering data on the effects and spread of Omicron, but Hinshaw says early indications are those who contract the variant can avoid severe outcomes if vaccinated.

She also reported 240 new cases of COVID-19 for a total of about 4,100 active cases.

There are 373 people in hospital with the illness, including 76 in intensive care.

Hinshaw says more than 60,000 youngsters between the ages of 5 to 11 have received a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2021

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Calgary researcher to lead study on E. coli infection in children

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CALGARY — A University of Calgary researcher will lead a North American study examining a new way to treat E. coli infections that can cause kidney failure in children.

Professor and pediatrician Stephen Freedman will oversee the 26-site project, set to include more than 1,000 kids and run six years beginning in September 2022.

The university says the U.S.-based National Institutes of Health is providing more than $11 million for the investigation, meant to stop disease from progressing from bloody diarrhea to kidney shutdown and neurologic complications.

The Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute is also providing funds.

The study will focus on Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, or STEC, which is commonly found in cattle and can spread to humans. The University of Calgary says Alberta has one of the highest rates of STEC infection in the world given its abundance of cattle, sloped terrain, food crops and use of well water.

Freedman says the study will be the first in 20 years to evaluate a treatment focused on stopping disease progression. 

He says it will consider the value of “early and aggressive intravenous rehydration,” a rarity in early stages of the illness. The approach calls for large volumes of intravenous fluids early-on in a bid to maintain blood flow to the kidneys.

Infected children in the study will be hospitalized before any complications occur, even if they appear relatively well, Freedman said Tuesday in a release.

“What often happens is infected children will recover from the diarrhea and may look well but in nearly 20 per cent of children, unbeknownst to their parents and sometimes doctors, their kidneys are in the process of failing,” Freedman said. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 100,000 high-risk STEC infections occur annually in the United States.

More than 60 per cent of these infections are in children, half of whom are younger than five years old. Young children are at the highest risk of complications, which can include renal failure, strokes and in rare cases, death.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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