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National

The documentary rocking Vancouver and shocking Canadians

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3 minute read

Vancouver based Independent Journalist Aaron Gunn has become one of Canada’s, largest and most listened to media voices. His work as been viewed over 50 million times. He produces a wildly popular youtube video series called “Politics Explained”
In this documentary Aaron Gunn examines the problem nearly all Canadian cities are experiencing.  A rise in tent cities, open drug scenes, and a dangerous criminal element seeping through downtown areas and beyond.  Perhaps no other city in Canada has experienced these issues as deeply as Vancouver.  Here is his documentary which has been viewed well over 2 million times!

From Aaron Gunn of Politics Explained

What is happening to the city of Vancouver?
Who is responsible for the surge in violent crime?
And is the introduction of a “safe supply” of toxic drugs, including heroin and crystal meth, really the solution the city needs?
Here’s what you need to know..

SUBSCRIBE:    / aarongunnbc  

SUPPORT ME: https://www.aarongunn.ca/contribute

FOLLOW ME: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aarongunnbc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aarongunn.ca Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/aarongunn

AARON IS AN INDEPENDENT JOURNALIST, AND ADVOCATE FOR TAXPAYERS AND COMMON SENSE

Aaron is Producer/Director of the hit online series, Politics Explained.

His videos have targeted, among others, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) for dramatically raising rates on BC drivers; Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps for tearing down the statue of Sir John A. Macdonald; Canada’s Justice System for its treatment of child murderers; and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for his massive deficits, destructive energy policy and obsession with political correctness.

Throughout, Aaron has demonstrated his commitment to lower taxes, less waste and a stronger Canada. His content, which he writes and produces himself, is funded by the generous contributions of ordinary, taxpaying Canadians. His videos, which are filmed across the country, have together been shared hundreds of thousands of times.

Prior to his work as Spokesperson for BC Proud (2017-19), Aaron worked for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) where he founded and became Executive Director of the Generation Screwed initiative, fighting back against government debt and its impact on future generations.

By the end of his tenure at the CTF, Generation Screwed had achieved a considerable online following and established a physical presence at over 30 university campuses across Canada.

Aaron has a Bachelor’s Degree of Commerce from the University of Victoria. He served three years in the Canadian Army Reserves and operated his own company, which he founded at age 15, for over ten years. Victoria, BC is home.

For media requests or to inquire about public speaking, contact Aaron here.

 

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Alberta

Premier Smith asks Prime Minister to halt “Just Transition” legislation

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Premier Smith meets with the Prime Minister

Premier Danielle Smith met with the Prime Minister for approximately 30 minutes primarily discussing Alberta’s request for the federal government to halt the introduction of its proposed ‘Just Transition’ legislation and other emission reduction strategies.

The Premier asked the federal government to instead work collaboratively with the Government of Alberta on developing a plan and partnership to attract energy investment and workers into Alberta’s conventional, non-conventional and emerging energy sectors while reducing Canada’s and Alberta’s net emissions.

The Prime Minister expressed a willingness to explore this strategy with the Premier through their respective ministers and the Premier will be following up with further correspondence regarding proposed next steps in the near future.

The Premier used today’s discussion to outline Alberta’s expectations as to what must and must not be included in any future federal legislation, targets or policies as it relates to Alberta’s energy sector. These expectations included:

  • Abandonment of any references to ‘just transition’ or any other terminology or policies that signal the phaseout of Alberta’s conventional or non-conventional energy sector or workforce.
  • Increased workforce training and participation in all of the conventional, non-conventional and emerging energy sectors.
  • The need for formal consultation and collaboration with Alberta before the federal government announces or implements legislation, targets or policies that materially impact Alberta’s energy sector.
  • Substantial increase in LNG exports to Asia through the lens of meeting targets through replacement of higher emitting fuel sources with clean Canadian LNG.
  • Joint federal-provincial initiatives to facilitate increased private investment in nuclear, hydrogen, bitumen beyond combustion, geothermal, lithium, helium, zero-emission vehicle, CCUS, petrochemical and other emerging technologies and fuels that make Alberta’s conventional and non-conventional energy sector increasingly carbon neutral.

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Alberta

What Trudeau has offered to the premiers to fund health care

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By Laura Osman in Ottawa

Premiers got their fist look at Ottawa’s offer to increase long-term health funding Tuesday at a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, but the federal proposal falls short of what they were seeking.

The provinces budgeted about $204 billion for health care in this fiscal year and the Canada Health Transfer was set at $45 billion, or about 22 per cent of that. The premiers want the federal share to increase to 35 per cent, which amounts to another $26 billion in this year alone.

Instead, Ottawa put together a 10-year, $196.1 billion deal, of which $46.2 billion is new funding.

Here’s what the Liberals are offering:

$2 billion, no questions asked

The federal government plans to table legislation before the end of March to dole out $2 billion to  provinces to address immediate health-care needs like surgical backlogs.

There are no strings attached.

Ottawa offered the same amount last year during the Omicron wave of COVID-19.

More money for the Canada Health Transfer

The main source of federal funding for health care comes from the Canada Health Transfer, which is the biggest pot of money the federal government gives to provinces and territories.

It’s calculated based on a minimum yearly increase of three per cent or the three-year moving average of nominal gross domestic product (GDP) — whichever is higher.

Ottawa has now offered to step up the minimum yearly increase to five per cent for the next five years.

The total amount after the five years will serve as the new baseline moving toward.

The move is expected to give provinces an extra $17.3 billion over 10 years in new support. The federal Finance Department anticipates the CHT to grow by 33 per cent over the next five years, and 61 per cent over the next 10 years.

It all hinges on better data

The increase to the Canada Health Transfer is contingent on an agreement to share comparable data and digitize the health information of Canadians so it can be more easily accessed and shared between hospitals, clinics and jurisdictions.

Tailored deals with each provinces 

Ottawa has also put $25 billion on the table for tailored one-on-one deals with each province to make progress on four major issues: family health services, health worker shortages and backlogs, mental health and substance use, and health-care modernization.

The deals will be highly flexible for each province, but they will have to show their work to get the money.

The government says it wants to see a plan from each province and targeted results they hope to accomplish. The provincial and territorial governments will then need to report on their progress.

Higher wages for personal support workers

Trudeau says he’ll give provinces $1.7 billion over five years to increase the pay for personal support workers, who provide the majority of bedside care in long-term care and homecare settings.

No targets have been set yet for how high those wages should be. In the last election, the Liberals pledged to increase personal support worker pay to a minimum of $25 per hour.

Indigenous health

The federal government put forward $2 billion over 10 years specifically for fair and equitable access to appropriate health care for Indigenous Peoples through a health-equity fund.

The spending will come after consultations with Indigenous groups.

Other spending

— $505 million over five years for the Canadian Institute for Health Information Canada Health Infoway, and other federal data agencies to develop new health data indicators, as well as create a “Centre of Excellence” on health worker data, and support other efforts to modernize health data systems.

— $150 million over five years for the Territorial Health Investment Fund for medical travel and to deliver health care in the territories.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 7, 2023.

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