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Alberta

Canadian energy company produces more energy and less green house gas emissions

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It would be interesting to know how many Albertans realize that Canadian energy companies are already producing less green house gas emissions.  Furthermore how many people know companies like Cenovus Energy have pledged and are already working toward incredibly aggressive emissions targets?   It’s true.  It’s already happening.   You can learn more about the Cenovus green house gas (ghg) emmissions strategy right here.

From Cenovus Energy 

Climate & greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

Focus area
2030 targets
Climate & GHG emissions
  • Reduce emissions intensity by 30%(1)
  • Hold absolute emissions flat(1)
Ambition: In addition to our 2030 climate & GHG targets above,
Cenovus’s long-term ambition is to reach net zero emissions by 2050.

(1) Includes scope 1 and 2 emissions from operated facilities. Uses a 2019 baseline. For more details, see the Definitions section of our ESG targets news release.

At Cenovus, we recognize the growing concerns of people around the world about climate change and we share the goal of reducing GHG emissions.

Governments are supporting the transition to a lower-carbon future by introducing increasingly stringent climate-related policies and creating incentives for emissions-reduction solutions. We believe companies that fail to adapt to this transition will face growing carbon-related risks, while those that act now will position themselves for long-term business resilience. That’s why Cenovus is focused on demonstrating equally strong financial, operational, and environmental, social & governance (ESG) performance.

Cenovus is already one of the lowest emissions producers of oil in Canada with production emissions well below the global average. Building on this, our new GHG emissions targets are among the most ambitious in the world for an upstream exploration and production company.

30% GHG intensity reduction

We plan to reduce our per-barrel GHG emissions by 30% by the end of 2030, using a 2019 baseline, and hold our absolute emissions flat by the end of 2030. In setting our GHG targets, we worked comprehensively with global experts to stress test both the targets and our strategic options for achieving them. And we analyzed scenarios from third parties to assess the resiliency of our business as we further reduce our emissions intensity.

Our GHG emissions strategy includes a number of options to reach our targets. These opportunities are at various stages of development, and include: additional operational optimization, incorporating cogeneration capacity into future oil sands phases, more extensive deployment of solvent technology, further advancement of the methane emissions reduction initiatives already underway at our Deep Basin operations and additional operational efficiencies, including the use of data analytics. Cenovus is also considering other direct and indirect initiatives that generate credible, additional and permanent carbon offsets.

Net zero emissions by 2050

Cenovus’s long-term ambition is to reach net zero emissions by 2050. This is intended to address upstream (scope 1 and scope 2) emissions and will require ongoing focus on technology solutions beyond those that are commercial and economic today. We continue to identify opportunities to participate in longer-term solutions to address emissions from our operations and beyond. This includes extensive collaboration efforts with our peers, academics, other industries and entrepreneurs from around the world.

Air quality

We monitor ambient air quality at our operations to ensure that sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations remain within acceptable levels. To reduce air pollutants such as SO2 and NOx, as well as GHG emissions such as methane, we invest in technologies that help lower energy consumption in our day-to-day operations and processes.

We’ve already made significant progress in reducing methane emissions at Cenovus and we’re continuing to work on projects at our operations to further reduce emissions. Studies have shown that methane is a much more potent GHG than CO2, which means that reducing methane emissions is a critical part of any plan to address climate change.

Quick facts

  • Between 2004 and 2019, Cenovus reduced the CO2 emissions intensity of its oil sands operations by about 30%
  • NOx emissions at our Christina Lake oil sands facility are about 50% below the regulatory threshold of 400 tonnes per year

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Alberta

World Cup super-G called off in Lake Louise because of too much snow

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LAKE LOUISE, Alta. — A World Cup men’s super-G race was cancelled Sunday in Lake Louise, Alta.

It was the second race called off because of too much snow. Friday’s downhill was also cancelled.

Matthias Mayer of Austria won Saturday’s downhill at the ski resort west of Calgary in Banff National Park.

The cancelled downhill in Canada has been added to the program for the next World Cup in Beaver Creek, Colo., starting Friday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 28, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

'For the greater good:' Indigenous financial advisor works to empower others

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CALGARY — It’s often said that every name tells a story. 

For Theodora Warrior, that couldn’t be more true.

“My name doesn’t lie,” says Warrior, a Blackfoot member of the Piikani Nation in southern Alberta. “The purpose of a warrior is not meant for battle. They are meant for protection and sacrifice for all for the greater good.”

Warrior is the first Indigenous financial facilitator for Momentum, a Calgary charity dedicated to community economic development.

Jeff Loomis, executive director of Momentum, says it’s committed to having a role in reconciliation with Indigenous communities and bringing Warrior onboard ensures a culturally relevant and supportive environment to aid in financial reconciliation.

Warrior views her job as one that empowers others, particularly Indigenous families such her own who experienced poverty as a result of the residential school system. 

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission report says the schools amounted to cultural genocide, stripping Indigenous people of their language and customs, and has led to chronic unemployment, poverty, poor housing, substance abuse, family violence and ill health.

About two years ago, Warrior attended a money management workshop hosted by Momentum, similar to one she now teaches, and was asked to write down a vision for her future.

She had lost everything — her house, job and belongings. She says it was a cycle she had repeated for years, from housed to homeless, employed to jobless, hopeful to disheartened.

Her vision on a piece of paper, now tucked away in a safe spot, listed 17 goals, including having a two-bedroom apartment, a healthier mental state, being debt-free with savings and having a steady job. 

Most of those dreams came true.

Warrior is now bringing the program that helped change her life to other Indigenous people in Alberta communities. She calls the workshop series Money Moccasins.

“Financial wellness is a lifelong journey,” says Warrior. “Walking barefoot can make the trip more difficult. Moccasins are very sturdy and strong.”

Thinking about the workshop she attended, Warrior says the information was helpful but the facilitator, who was white, lacked an understanding of unique barriers faced by Indigenous people.

The facilitator talked about spending $200 on plants, almost the same amount Warrior had received monthly on welfare.

“It had nothing to do with where we come from, what we really encounter, what we have to work with,” says Warrior.

Warrior’s mother and grandmother attended residential schools. 

As a child, she remembers living in apartments with cockroaches, using food banks and moving frequently, both on and off reserve. Her mother, who has three university degrees, often worked multiple jobs. 

Warrior says she believes the repercussions of the residential school system left her mom struggling to find financial stability.

As Warrior became an adult, she also had trouble staying afloat.

There were months when she had money from working in the trucking or hydrovac industries. At one point, she had a five-bedroom house and was financing a new vehicle.

But, she says, everything fell apart in about nine months when a friend moved out without paying their share of the bills and work opportunities disappeared.

When looking for a place to live, she says she faced encounters with landlords who hurled racist and prejudicial comments. Sometimes she left showings in tears.

Warrior says she stayed in women’s shelters and slept in empty apartments.

“I’ve been through it all,” she says. “Homeless. Hitchhiking. Food banks. Relying on the kindness of strangers … the depression that comes with it, domestic violence, alcoholism, addiction.”

She says she openly shares her experiences now with those in Money Moccasins. She remembers one participant who laughed when Warrior told the class she was in bankruptcy.

“‘Who better to learn from than somebody who’s been there?’ Warrior recalls telling the woman. “Being open and vulnerable with them like that drops their guard.”

Warrior keeps a constant reminder of how far she’s come at her desk. Her computer screensaver shows Warrior looking into the distance with her sprawling First Nation behind her.

The photo was taken the day before she lost her driver’s licence for drinking. Shortly after that, in 2019, she attended her first class at Momentum and got a job with the charity.

She describes her Money Moccasins program, which started this year and explores assets, budgeting, banking, credit and consumerism, as generation changing.

“In this Western world, money is life. In our world, water is life,” says Warrior.

“This course, these classes, they give you something to hold that water. They show you that you can save your water, that your water is meant to be saved for the next generation.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 28, 2021.

Alanna Smith, The Canadian Press

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