Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"] [the_ad id="89560"]

Health

Alberta to ban people from under 18 from using UV tanning beds on Jan. 1

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • EDMONTON — After years of lobbying by health groups Alberta is finally moving to ban young people from using indoor tanning beds over growing fears about skin cancer.

    The government says youths under 18 will not be allowed to use ultraviolet tanning machines starting on Jan. 1.

    Businesses will also be prohibited from advertising such machines to minors and must post signs about the age restrictions and the dangers of UV tanning.

    “Research has shown that using artificial tanning when you are under 35 dramatically increases your risk for melanoma,” Health Minister Sarah Hoffman said Wednesday.

    “The changes we’re making will help protect our youth from a disease that affects hundreds of Albertans every year and gives Albertans better information about the risks of artificial tanning.”

    Alberta’s Skin Cancer Prevention (Artificial Tanning) Act was passed by the legislature in March 2015 but has just been proclaimed.

    The government said it needed time to consult with businesses and health groups before setting a date for the ban. 

    Alberta is the only province that still allows people under the age of 18 to use indoor tanning equipment.

    The Canadian Cancer Society had been urging the NDP government to take action, warning the delay has been putting young people at risk of developing skin cancer, including potentially deadly melanoma.

    The society outlined its concerns about the delay to Hoffman in a letter on March 6.

    Dan Holinda, a Canadian Cancer Society spokesman, praised the government Wednesday for proclaiming the legislation.

    “Preventing teen use of artificial tanning equipment will reduce skin cancer, which, despite being highly preventable, is one of the fastest-rising cancers,” Holinda said in a release.

    “As a survivor of this disease myself, I want to thank the government for proclaiming this act — it will save lives.”

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in Alberta and accounts for more than one-third of all new cancer cases.

    UV radiation exposure accounts for about 82 per cent of melanoma, which is the deadliest form of skin cancer.

    Melanoma is one of the fastest-growing preventable cancers and research indicates that using indoor tanning equipment during youth increases the risk of melanoma by nearly 60 per cent.

    The society estimates that one-third of 17-year-old girls have used tanning beds.

    In 2014, there were 665 new cases of melanoma in Alberta and 64 deaths due to the disease.

     

    John Cotter, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!

    Health

    ‘It’s daunting:’ Family of paralyzed Broncos player preparing for next phase

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • AIRDRIE, Alta. — The parents of a paralyzed Humboldt Broncos hockey player are preparing for the next phase of his recovery — his return home. 

    Ryan Straschnitzki, 19, is undergoing physiotherapy at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia after becoming paralyzed from the chest down in a crash between a semi-trailer and a bus carrying the Broncos junior hockey team at a rural Saskatchewan intersection in April.

    He’s expected to return home to Airdrie, just north of Calgary, in a matter of weeks.

    His father, Tom Straschnitzki, says he’s already gone through six training programs on how to care for his son once he’s no longer under the constant watchful eye of medical personnel.

    The programs include basics of day-to-day care, medication his son is taking and warning signs if something goes wrong.

    “Because he can’t feel anything, if there’s a wrinkle, he’ll turn all red and his blood pressure will drop. We’ve got to figure out the signs and try and fix the problem,” said Straschnitzki in an interview at his home with The Canadian Press.

    “It’s scary. Hopefully we’ll know what to do and they’ve trained us pretty good.”

    Straschnitzki says the family home is about to be renovated to accommodate his son. An elevator is being installed, walls are being knocked down, doorways widened and bathrooms adapted. The reno could take up to six months and, during that time, they’ll need to find a new place to live.

    “It’s daunting,” he said. “It’s a lot of work, like building a brand new house.”

    The basement where his son will be living is crammed with souvenirs he collected growing up and a lot more that have come in since the accident.

    “That’s Connor McDavid’s stick over there,” Straschnitzki said as he pointed to a corner in the basement. “There’s boxes and boxes of letters and we ran out of room here so we put the rest in his room.”

    Two books on the floor included “99” by Wayne Gretzky and “Against All Odds”, the untold story of Canada’s university hockey heroes.

    A fundraiser to help with the family’s costs was scheduled for Saturday night at the Genesis Centre in Airdrie.

    Cody Thompson, Ryan Straschnitzki’s former trainer and the event’s organizer, said it’s important the young man have access to treatment and resources.

    “Any time you talk to anyone with a spinal cord injury, the first thing they will tell you is the younger you are, the more expensive it becomes, because of the longer time you will live with that injury,” he said.

    “If you have the financial wherewithal, the likelihood of you coming out of this with more meaningful movement, mobility and strength to lead a normal life is exponentially higher (than) if you don’t have that ability.”

    This time last year, Thompson said, Ryan was focused on playing with a junior A hockey team.

    “Now he’s focused on gaining his ability to walk again and gaining full control over his body.”

    Sixteen people died, including 10 players, and 13 others were injured as a result of bus crash. RCMP continue to investigate and no charges have been laid.

    — Follow @BillGraveland on Twitter

    Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Health

    All kids should get vaccinated for hepatitis B at birth, experts say

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • TORONTO — Clinicians and researchers attending an international conference say all Canadian children should be vaccinated against hepatitis B starting at birth to prevent the development of potentially deadly liver disease later in life, a policy recommended by the World Health Organization.

    Currently, most provinces and territories immunize children against the liver-destroying virus when they are much older, including Ontario and Nova Scotia, which suggest children be vaccinated as late as 12 years old.

    Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood and other bodily fluids. The virus attacks the liver, causing ongoing scar-forming inflammation that over time can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure or liver cancer.

    The call for at-birth immunization comes from international experts attending the Global Hepatitis Summit in Toronto, which runs through Sunday.

    “There is a misconception that we only need to offer older children vaccination in the years before they become sexually active, since sexual activity is one of the routes of transmission,” said Dr. Harry Janssen, director of the Toronto Centre for Liver Disease, who is attending the conference.

    “Hepatitis B is not just a disease that is transmitted by sexual activity, it’s also transmitted by blood-to-blood contact,” Janssen said in an interview. “Children play with each other … bite each other, scratch each other, share each other’s toothbrush. There’s household contact with people who have hepatitis B.

    “So there is a definite risk of getting this infection in childhood.”

    An estimated 230,000 Canadians are infected with hepatitis B, but many are unaware they harbour the virus. Less than 60 per cent of those infected have been diagnosed and only a quarter of those eligible for treatment are believed to be receiving it, doctors say.

    Worldwide, an estimated 257 million people are living with hepatitis B, says WHO. In 2015, almost 900,000 people died as a result of the disease, which is known as a “silent killer.”

    “In the first years, you don’t have any symptoms,” said Janssen. “But then people show up after the age of 40, 45 with liver cancer and they didn’t even know they had the infection.”

    Infants and young children are among those at the highest risk of infection, and the disease has the worst impact within that age range, since more than 90 per cent will develop chronic hepatitis B, he said. While the risk of progression to severe liver disease is highest among children infected before their first birthday, up to half of kids aged one to five also will develop a chronic form of infection.

    That compares to five to 10 per cent of those infected at 18 or older, WHO says. Between 20 and 30 per cent of adults who are chronically infected will develop cirrhosis and/or liver cancer.

    “That’s a very important reason to vaccinate at an early age, because if these children get infected, the likelihood of them getting chronic disease is much higher,” stressed Janssen.

    The vaccine against hepatitis B has been available since 1982 and is 95 per cent effective in preventing infection and the development of chronic disease and liver cancer caused by the virus.

    WHO recommends that all infants should receive their first dose of vaccine as soon as possible after birth, preferably within 24 hours.

    Two other doses would follow a couple of months apart, typically at the same time as other childhood immunizations are given, starting at two months of age.

    However, policies for when hepatitis B shots should be given vary widely across Canada.

    P.E.I. and Yukon vaccinate young children from age two months, but only New Brunswick, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories offer inoculate at birth.

    Other provinces immunize children when they are older: Manitoba at age nine, Alberta at 10, and Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador at 11. British Columbia introduced vaccination for infants from age two months in 2001, followed by Quebec in 2013, although that province still inoculates children who are not covered by the new program at age nine.

    “Since all children across Canada will eventually be vaccinated regardless of where they live, why don’t we just remove this lottery and routinely vaccinate them all from birth?” said Janssen.

    “This will reduce new cases of hepatitis B among children to near zero and remove the chance that any of them will become chronically infected.”

    The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends immunizing all children before they reach adolescence, although newborns of mothers who have hepatitis B should receive at-birth inoculation.

    The CPS also advises vaccination for: anyone living in a home with a hepatitis B-infected person; all children whose families have immigrated from areas with high rates of hepatitis B or who are travelling to such countries; and children with conditions that require frequent transfusions of blood or blood products or who are on hemodialysis for kidney disease.

    Dr. John Ward of the Centers for Disease Control said that since 2005, the U.S. agency had recommended that all newborns in the country receive a birth dose of the vaccine within the first three days of life, which subsequently decreased transmission of the virus by more than 90 per cent.

    In January, the CDC updated that advice, recommending that all infants be vaccinated within 24 hours of birth, in line with WHO’s policy. At the same time, it said babies born to hepatitis B-infected mothers should also be given hepatitis B antibodies to further protect against infection.

    The WHO has set a goal of eliminating hepatitis B worldwide by 2030, and the UN body has called on all countries to sign on to that commitment.

    “The cornerstone of elimination of hepatitis B is hepatitis B vaccination of young children beginning at birth, because they are at the highest risk of remaining infected,” said Ward, director of the CDC’s viral hepatitis division.  

    “And if they become infected, 25 per cent of them will die of hepatitis B if they’re not diagnosed and managed and treated in later life.”

    There is no overall cure for the disease, added Janssen, though medications can suppress replication of the virus in the liver, helping to limit damage.

    About five per cent of those being treated are able to eradicate the virus from their bodies, but the rest must take the drugs for the remainder of their lives, he said.         

    — Follow @SherylUbelacker on Twitter.

    Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Community Events

    june, 2018

    wed30may - 26sepmay 303:30 pmsep 26ATB Financial Downtown Market(may 30) 3:30 pm - (september 26) 6:30 pm

    sun10jun - 24jun 1010:00 amjun 242018 Edgar Farms Asparagus Festival10:00 am - 4:00 pm (24)

    sun17jun - 1juljun 1710:00 amjul 1- 4:00 pm2018 Edgar Farms Asparagus Festival10:00 am - (july 1) 4:00 pm

    tue19jun7:00 pm- 11:30 pmSebastian Bach w/ Guest The Standstills & Sweetgrass- June 19th7:00 pm - 11:30 pm

    tue19jun - 15juljun 198:00 pmjul 15Freewill Shakespeare Festival8:00 pm - (july 15) 10:30 pm

    wed20jun9:00 am- 11:00 amAlliance MeetingsTopic: Red Deer’s Community Safety Strategy9:00 am - 11:00 am

    wed20jun5:45 pm- 8:00 pmRed Deer County Eco-Buffer and Shelterbelt Workshop5:45 pm - 8:00 pm

    thu21jun - 3juljun 216:30 pmjul 3THE WORKS ART & DESIGN FESTIVAL6:30 pm - (july 3) 12:00 am

    fri22jun - 1juljun 227:30 pmjul 1- 9:15 pmEdmonton International Jazz Festival7:30 pm - (july 1) 9:15 pm

    fri22jun - 23jun 229:00 pmjun 23A Weekend With St. James Gate I Bo's Bar & Stage9:00 pm - 1:00 am (23)

    sat23junAll DayRed Deer Highland Games(All Day: saturday)

    sat23jun4:00 pm- 8:00 pmOlds Beer Festival4:00 pm - 8:00 pm

    sun24jun11:00 am- 2:00 pmOne Eleven Jazzy Brunch11:00 am - 2:00 pm

    mon25jun - 3sepAll DayRip ‘N Rec Summer Pass returns for youth in Red Deer(All Day)

    tue26jun5:00 pm- 6:30 pmUnited Way Central Alberta Annual General Meeting5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

    tue26jun - 22juljun 268:00 pmjul 22Freewill Shakespeare Festival8:00 pm - (july 22) 10:30 pm

    wed27jun - 1juljun 279:00 amjul 1- 8:00 pmWestern Canadian Breeders Championships9:00 am - (july 1) 8:00 pm

    wed27jun2:00 pm- 3:30 pmMayor’s Garden Party2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

    sat30jun9:00 am- 12:00 pmRed Deer Roundup 5k/10k/15k Run9:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Red Deer
    8°
    few clouds
    humidity: 87%
    wind: 2m/s S
    H 10 • L 7
    27°
    Tue
    27°
    Wed
    30°
    Thu
    26°
    Fri
    Weather from OpenWeatherMap

    Trending

    X