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Alberta suspends caribou protection plan, asks for assistance from Ottawa

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  • EDMONTON — Alberta is suspending portions of its draft plan to protect threatened woodland caribou, saying more research needs to be done and that Ottawa needs to help out.

    Environment Minister Shannon Phillips told the house Monday that the province is acting on concerns about the economic impacts of the protection plan.

    “The federal Species at Risk Act is an extremely inflexible instrument that has already had negative economic consequences (in Alberta),” said Phillips.

    “We are going to do our best to make sure that we protect jobs on this.”

    She said she has sent that message in a letter to her federal counterpart, Catherine McKenna.

    Phillips is urging the federal government to help Alberta come up with a workable solution rather than have Ottawa impose an environmental protection order.

    Alberta’s draft plan is in response to a federal deadline under the Species at Risk Act passed last October and is designed to help threatened woodland caribou recover in 15 different ranges.

    The province released its draft plan on Dec. 19 and then held a series of town hall meetings.

    “The public meetings were attended by thousands of Albertans who are concerned about the impact caribou range plans will have on their communities and on the industries that support those communities,” stated Phillips’ letter, which was co-signed by Energy Minister Marg McCuaig-Boyd.

    The province plans to spend more than $85 million in the next five years to restore caribou habitat by eliminating seismic lines, building birthing pens and bringing in other measures.

    It has already invested $9.2 million and the estimated cost over the next 40 years is $1 billion.

    Phillips said the feds need to step up on planning and consultation, and on the money side as well.

    “Caribou recovery cannot occur without an infusion of federal funds to restore habitat necessary to ensure population growth,” she wrote.

    “While we need more time and partnership from the federal government on this matter, we also need your support in not prematurely implementing federal protection orders that will not have effective outcomes for Canadians and Albertans.”

    The federal government has the option of imposing an environmental protection order if a province doesn’t come up with a plan to protect the caribou. The order would halt any development, such as oil drilling, that could harm the animals.

     

    Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press


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    National

    Canadian was killed in Peru, Global Affairs says

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  • The death of a Canadian who was killed in Peru is linked to the reported murder of an Indigenous human rights defender, Canadian authorities said Sunday.

    Global Affairs Canada confirmed in an email that the killing of the unnamed Canadian is related to the alleged assassination of Indigenous elder Olivia Arevalo Lomas.

    Arevalo Lomas was a human rights activist of the Shipibo-Konibo people in the Ucayali region.

    The federal government said it is providing consular assistance to the family of the Canadian.

    The government extended its condolences following Arevalo Lomas’s death. 

    Peru’s police ombudsman condemned the death of the Indigenous elder in series of Twitter messages, describing Arevalo Lomas as a promoter of her people’s cultural rights.

    The ombudsman said increased illegal activity was putting Indigenous people’s lives at risk.

    The Canadian Press


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    Liberal MP Drouin says allegation made against him at party’s Halifax convention

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  • OTTAWA — Liberal MP Francis Drouin says an allegation has been made against him following an incident at the party’s convention in Halifax this weekend.

    Drouin, a 34-year-old MP from eastern Ontario, was described earlier this year as a rising star in the Liberal Party with a firm grip on the agriculture file and standing as the most-lobbied backbench MP on Parliament Hill.

    In a statement emailed to Liberal MPs and staff Sunday, Drouin says he can confirm an allegation has been made but doesn’t say what it is about.

    He says he is co-operating fully with the investigation, that no charges have been laid against him and he believes it is important for all individuals to feel safe coming forward with their stories and to receive support.

    The news comes a day after the Liberal Party held an hour-long seminar at the convention named “From #MeToo to never again: creating safe work environments.”

    A spokesman for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office says all questions should be directed to the party’s whip, Pablo Rodriguez, who hasn’t yet responded to a request for comment.

    The Canadian Press


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